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  1. House of Griffin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Pomerania

    The House of Griffin or Griffin dynasty (German: Greifen; Polish: Gryfici) was a dynasty ruling the Duchy of Pomerania from the 12th century until 1637. The name "Griffins" was used by the dynasty after the 15th century and had been taken from the ducal coat of arms.

  2. House of Griffins | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/House_of_Griffins

    The House of Griffins or House of Pomerania (German: Greifen; Polish: Gryfici), also known as House of Greifen,[4] was a dynasty of dukes ruling the Duchy of Pomerania from the 12th century until 1637. The name "Griffins" was used by the dynasty after the 15th century[5] and had been taken from the ducal coat of arms. Wartislaw I (around 1091 – died August 9, 1135) was the first historical ...

  3. German and Austrian Nobles & Royals — House of Coburg & of ...

    germanaustriannoblesandroyals.tumblr.com/post/...

    Despite all her troubles, Alexandra was very close with her mother and tried to be as useful and kind as possible after her father’s death. Alexandra especially took care of the poor in Aschaffenburg. In 1860, she sponsored a public kitchen for the poor and sick there. Alexandra died on May 8th, 1877, at the age of only 49 at Nymphenburg Castle.

  4. Woman claiming to be Anastasia Romanov arrives in ... - HISTORY

    www.history.com/this-day-in-history/anastasia...
    • Plot summary
    • Controversy
    • Death
    • Aftermath
    • Later career
    • Investigation
    • Recognition
    • Later life
    • Genetics
    • Analysis

    On February 6, 1928, a woman calling herself Anastasia Tschaikovsky and claiming to be the youngest daughter of the murdered Russian czar Nicholas II arrives in New York City. She held a press conference on the liner Berengaria, explaining she was here to have her jaw reset. It was broken, she alleged, by a Bolshevik soldier during her narrow escape from the execution of her entire familythe Romanovsat Ekaterinburg, Russia, in July 1918. Tschaikovsky was welcomed to New York by Gleb Botkin, the son of the Romanov family doctor who was executed along with his patients in 1918. Botkin called her Your Highness and claimed that she was without a doubt the Grand Duchess Anastasia with whom he had played as a child.

    Between 1918 and 1928, more than half a dozen other women had come forward claiming to be a lost heir to the Romanov fortune, so some American reporters were understandingly skeptical of Tschaikovskys claims. Nevertheless, she was treated as a celebrity during her stay in New York and occasioned society parties and fashionable hotels worthy of a Romanov heir. Registering for one hotel during her visit, she used the name Anna Anderson, which later became her permanent alias.

    Just after midnight on July 17, 1918, Nicholas, Alexandra, their five children, and four family retainers, among them Dr. Botkin, were ordered to dress quickly and go down to the cellar of the house in which they were being held. There, the family and servants were arranged in two rowsfor a photograph, they were told, to quell rumors that they had escaped. Suddenly, nearly a dozen armed men burst into the room and shot the imperial family in a hail of gunfire. Those who were still breathing when the smoked cleared were stabbed to death.

    The executioners then took the bodies to an abandoned mine shaft some 14 miles from Ekaterinburg, burned them in a gasoline-fueled bonfire, and doused the bones with sulfuric acid to further disguise the remains. Finally, what was left was thrown into the mine pit, which was covered with dirt. At first, the Bolshevik government reported that only Nicholas was executed and that his wife and children were moved to a safe location. Later, reports that the entire family had perished were confirmed by Russian investigators. At the same time, however, a persistent rumor spread through Europe, telling of a Romanov child, usually Anastasia, who had survived the carnage. Several pretenders came forward, hoping to cash in on the Romanov fortune reportedly held in European banks, but they were quickly exposed as frauds. Europe, however, had yet to meet Anna Anderson.

    During the next few years, her entourage of Russian emigres grew, and she became particularly close to Gleb Botkin, who as the son of the slain Romanov family physician had spent considerable time with the imperial family in his childhood. During this time, numerous Romanov relatives and acquaintances interviewed her, and many were impressed by both her resemblance to Anastasia and her knowledge of the small details of the Romanovs family life. Others, however, left skeptical when she failed to remember important events of young Anastasias life. Her knowledge of English, French, and Russian, which the young Anastasia knew how to speak well, were also significantly lacking. Many blamed these inconsistencies on her reoccurring mental illness, which led to short stays in mental institutions on several occasions.

    The Grand Duke of Hesse, Alexandras brother and Anastasias uncle, was a major critic of this effort, and he hired a private investigator to determine Anastasia Tschaikovskys true identity. The investigator announced that she was in fact Franziska Schanzkowska, a Polish-German factory worker from Pomerania who had disappeared in 1920. Schanzkowska had a history of mental instability and was injured in a factory explosion in 1916, which accounted for the scars. These findings were published in German newspapers but were not proved definitively. In 1991, Russian amateur investigators, using a recently released government report on the Romanov execution, found what they thought to be the Romanov burial site. Russian authorities took over and exhumed human remains. Scientists studied the skulls, claiming that Anastasias was among those found, but the Russian findings were not conclusive. To prove that the remains were indisputably those of the Romanovs, the Russians enlisted the aid of British DNA experts. First, the scientists tested for sex and identified five females and four males among the remains. Next they tested to see how, if at all, these people were related. A father and mother were identified, along with three daughters. The four other remains were likely those of servants. The son Alexei and one daughter were missing.

    The woman who became known as Anna Anderson continued her fight for recognition, losing several court cases as the decades passed. A French play about her story, Anastasia, debuted in 1954, and in 1956 an American film version appeared, with Ingrid Bergman winning an Academy Award for her title role.

    In 1968, Anne Anderson married an American history professor, J.E. Manahan, and moved to the United States, living her final years in Charlottesville, Virginia. In 1970, she lost her last major suit, and a remaining portion of the Romanov fortune was awarded to the duchess of Mecklenberg. Anna Anderson Manahan died in 1984.

    To prove the identity of Alexandra and her children, the scientists took blood from Prince Philip, the consort of Queen Elizabeth II and the grand nephew of Alexandra. Because they all share a common maternal ancestor, they would all share mitochondria DNA, which is passed almost unchanged from mother to children. The comparison between the mtDNA in Philips blood and in the remains was positive, proving them to be the Romanovs. To prove the czars identity, who would not share this mtDNA, the remains of Grand Duke George, the brother of Nicholas, were exhumed. A comparison of their mtDNA proved their relation.

    Later, the scientists compared Anna Andersons mtDNA with that of Karl Maucher, a great nephew of Franziska Schanzkowska. The DNA was a match, finally proving the theory put forth by a German investigator in the 1920s. One of the great mysteries of the 20th century was solved.

  5. Battle of Tollense Valley 4,250 years ago was a massacre of ...

    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-8879473

    Oct 26, 2020 · Fresh analysis of Europe's earliest known battle has thrown up the possibility the 1,400 people who died at the site, in Germany's Tollense Valley, were not warriors engaged in a brutal melee, but ...

  6. The Power of Nature‐Based Solutions: How Peatlands Can Help ...

    onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/adsu...

    Peatlands are a natural carbon store covering ≈1 000 000 km2 in Europe. Many peatlands have been artificially drained, causing enormous emissions of CO2, soil subsidence, mobilization of nutrients, f...

  7. Louise of Great Britain - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_of_Great_Britain...

    Louise of Great Britain (originally Louisa; 18 December 1724 – 19 December 1751) was Queen of Denmark and Norway from 1746 until her death, as the first wife of King Frederick V. She was the youngest surviving daughter of King George II of Great Britain and Caroline of Ansbach .

  8. Ancestors of Prince William of England. Here is the pedigree of England's Heir Apparent presented as an ahnenreihe. To save space, ancestors beyond Generation 11 are omitted unless they are alleged descendants of Charlemagne or Alexander the Great. Be aware that many of the ancient ancestries depicted are speculative or fictitious.

  9. December 25 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_25

    December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar.Six days remain until the end of the year.

  10. July 29 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/July_29

    1848 – Great Famine of Ireland: Tipperary Revolt: In County Tipperary, Ireland, then in the United Kingdom, an unsuccessful nationalist revolt against British rule is put down by police. 1851 – Annibale de Gasparis discovers asteroid 15 Eunomia. 1858 – United States and Japan sign the Harris Treaty.

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