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  1. Lord's Prayer - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord's_Prayer

    The translators of the 1611 King James Bible assumed that a Greek manuscript they possessed was ancient and therefore adopted the phrase "For thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory forever" into the Lord's Prayer of Matthew's Gospel.

  2. Byzantine Rite - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_the_Byzantine_Rite

    The Byzantine Rite, also known as the Greek Rite or Constantinopolitan Rite, is the liturgical rite used by the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Greek Catholic Churches, and in a modified form, Byzantine Rite Lutheranism. Its development began during the fourth century in Constantinople.

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  4. Vulgate - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Vulgate

    The Vulgate (/ ˈ v ʌ l ɡ eɪ t,-ɡ ə t /; Biblia Vulgāta, Latin pronunciation: [bɪbˈli.a wʊlˈɡaːta]) is a late-4th-century Latin translation of the Bible.It was to become the Catholic Church's officially promulgated Latin version of the Bible during the 16th century and is still used in the Latin Church alongside the Hebrew and Greek sources.

  5. West Syriac Rite - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Syrian_Christianity

    The West Syriac Rite, also called Antiochene Rite, is an Eastern Christian liturgical rite that employs the Divine Liturgy of Saint James in the West Syriac dialect. It is practised in the Maronite Church, the Syriac Orthodox Church, the Syriac Catholic Church and various Malankara Churches of India. It is one of two main liturgical rites of Syriac Christianity, the other being the East Syriac Rite. It originated in the ancient Patriarchate of Antioch. It has more anaphoras than any other rite.

  6. Terce - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad_Tertiam

    Terce, or Third Hour, is a fixed time of prayer of the Divine Office in almost all the Christian liturgies. It consists mainly of psalms and is said at 9 a.m. Its name comes from Latin and refers to the third hour of the day after dawn.

  7. Council of Jerusalem - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Council_at_Jerusalem

    The Council of Jerusalem is generally dated to 48 AD, roughly 15 to 25 years after the crucifixion of Jesus, between 26 and 36 AD. Acts 15 and Galatians 2 both suggest that the meeting was called to debate whether or not male Gentiles who were converting to become followers of Jesus were required to become circumcised; the rite of circumcision was considered execrable and repulsive during the ...

  8. Biblical apocrypha - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apocrypha_(Biblical)

    Jerome completed his version of the Bible, the Latin Vulgate, in 405.In the Middle Ages, the Vulgate became the de facto standard version of the Bible in the West.The Vulgate manuscripts included prologues, in which Jerome clearly identified certain books of the older Old Latin Old Testament version as apocryphal – or non-canonical – even though they might be read as scripture.

  9. Who are Coptic Christians (Copts)? The History & Beliefs of ...

    www.christianity.com/church/denominations/who...

    Nov 02, 2018 · The church observes the Alexandrian Rite for its liturgy, prayer and devotional heritage. With 18–22 million members worldwide, whereof about 15 to 18 million are in Egypt, it is the country's largest Christian denomination.

  10. APOCRYPHAL GOSPELS – WIKIPEDIA | THE OTHER BOOKS OF THE BIBLE

    theapocryphalbooks.wordpress.com/apocryphal...

    apocryphal gospels – wikipedia The Biblical apocrypha (from the Greek word ἀπόκρυφος, apókruphos , meaning “hidden”) denotes the collection of ancient books found, in some editions of the Bible , in a separate section between the Old and New Testaments [1] or as an appendix after the New Testament. [2]