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  1. Alexios IV Angelos - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Alexios_IV_Angelos

    Alexios IV Angelos or Alexius IV Angelus ( Greek: Αλέξιος Δ' Άγγελος) (c. 1182 – 8 February 1204) was Byzantine Emperor from August 1203 to January 1204. He was the son of Emperor Isaac II Angelos and his first wife, an unknown Palaiologina, who became a nun with the name Irene.

  2. Alexios IV Angelos | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Alexios_IV_Angelos
    • Prince in Exile
    • Emperor
    • Deposition and Death
    • References

    The young Alexios was imprisoned in 1195 when Alexios III overthrew Isaac II in a coup. In 1201, two Pisan merchants were employed to smuggle Alexius out of Constantinople to the Holy Roman Empire, where he took refuge with his brother-in-law Philip of Swabia, King of Germany. While there he met with Marquis Boniface of Montferrat, Philip's cousin, who had been chosen to lead the Fourth Crusade, but had temporarily left the Crusade during the siege of Zara to visit Philip. Boniface and Alexios discussed diverting the Crusade to Constantinople so that Alexios could be restored to his father's throne; in return, Alexios would give them 10,000 Byzantine soldiers to help fight in the Crusade, maintain 500 knights in the Holy Land, the service of the Byzantine navy (20 ships) in transporting the Crusader army to Egypt, as well as money to pay off the Crusaders' debt to the Republic of Venicewith 200,000 silver marks. Additionally, he promised to bring the Greek Orthodox Church under the...

    On July 18, 1203 the Crusaders launched an assault on the city, and Alexios III immediately fled into Thrace. The next morning the Crusaders were surprised to find that the citizens had released Isaac II from prison and proclaimed him emperor, despite the fact that he had been blinded to make him ineligible to rule. The Crusaders could not accept this, and forced Isaac II to proclaim his son Alexios IV co-emperor on August 1. Despite Alexios' grand promises, Isaac, the more experienced and practical of the two, knew that the Crusaders' debt could never be repaid from the imperial treasury. Alexios, however, had apparently not grasped how far the empire's financial resources had fallen during the previous fifty years. Alexios did manage to raise half the sum promised (100,000 silver marks), by appropriating treasures from the church and by confiscating the property of his enemies. He then attempted to defeat his uncle Alexios III, who remained in control of Thrace. The sack of some T...

    At the end of January 1204, the populace of Constantinople rebelled and tried to proclaim a rival emperor in Hagia Sophia. Alexios IV attempted to reach a reconciliation with the Crusaders, entrusting the anti-western courtier Alexios Doukas Murzuphluswith a mission to gain Crusader support. However, Alexios Doukas imprisoned both Alexios IV and his father on the night of January 27–28, 1204. Isaac II died soon afterwards, possibly of old age or from poison, and Alexios IV was strangled on February 8. Alexios Doukas was proclaimed emperor as Alexios V. During Alexios IV's brief reign, the empire lost its territories along the Black Sea coast to the Empire of Trebizond.

    Angold, Michael, The Fourth Crusade(London and New York, 2004).
    Brand, C.M., 'A Byzantine Plan for the Fourth Crusade', Speculum, 43 (1968), pp. 462–75.
    Harris, Jonathan, Byzantium and the Crusades(London and New York, 2003).
    The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, Oxford University Press, 1991.
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  4. Alexios IV Angelos (c1182-1204) | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org › wiki › Alexios_IV_Angelos_(c
    • Prince in Exile
    • Emperor
    • Deposition and Death
    • in Popular Culture
    • References

    The young Alexios was imprisoned in 1195 when Alexios III overthrew Isaac II in a coup. In 1201, two Pisan merchants were employed to smuggle Alexius out of Constantinople to the Holy Roman Empire, where he took refuge with his brother-in-law Philip of Swabia, King of Germany. According to the contemporary account of Robert of Clari it was while Alexius was at Swabia's court that he met with Marquis Boniface of Montferrat, Philip's cousin, who had been chosen to lead the Fourth Crusade, but had temporarily left the Crusade during the siege of Zara to visit Philip. Boniface and Alexios allegedly discussed diverting the Crusade to Constantinople so that Alexios could be restored to his father's throne. Montferrat returned to the Crusade while it wintered at Zara and he was shortly followed by Prince Alexios's envoys who offered to the Crusaders 10,000 Byzantine soldiers to help fight in the Crusade, maintain 500 knights in the Holy Land, the service of the Byzantine navy (20 ships) in...

    On 18 July 1203 the Crusaders launched an assault on the city, and Alexios III immediately fled into Thrace. The next morning the Crusaders were surprised to find that the citizens had released Isaac II from prison and proclaimed him emperor, despite the fact that he had been blinded to make him ineligible to rule. The Crusaders could not accept this, and forced Isaac II to proclaim his son Alexios IV co-emperor on 1 August. Despite Alexios' grand promises, Isaac, the more experienced and practical of the two, knew that the Crusaders' debt could never be repaid from the imperial treasury. Alexios, however, had apparently not grasped how far the empire's financial resources had fallen during the previous fifty years. Alexios did manage to raise half the sum promised (100,000 silver marks), by appropriating treasures from the church and by confiscating the property of his enemies. He then attempted to defeat his uncle Alexios III, who remained in control of Thrace. The sack of some Th...

    At the end of January 1204, the populace of Constantinople rebelled and tried to proclaim a rival emperor in Hagia Sophia. Alexios IV attempted to reach a reconciliation with the Crusaders, entrusting the anti-western courtier Alexios Doukas Murzuphlus with a mission to gain Crusader support. However, Alexios Doukas imprisoned both Alexios IV and his father on the night of 27–28 January 1204. Isaac II died soon afterwards, possibly of old age or from poison, and Alexios IV was strangled on 8 February. Alexios Doukas was proclaimed emperor as Alexios V. During Alexios IV's brief reign, the empire lost its territories along the Black Sea coast to the Empire of Trebizond.

    Alexios IV is mentioned in the "Map of the Seven Knights" episode of the 5th season of the Grimm TV series. He is mentioned as a pro-Crusader. In Soviet historiography, the opinion was affirmed that the Chernigov princess Yevfimiya Glebovnawas intended as Alexios's wife, but she probably died before the marriage and the events of 1195, which changed the political situation in Byzantium.

    Angold, Michael, The Fourth Crusade(London and New York, 2004).
    Brand, C.M., 'A Byzantine Plan for the Fourth Crusade', Speculum, 43 (1968), pp. 462–75.
    Harris, Jonathan, Byzantium and the Crusades (2nd ed. London and New York, 2014). ISBN 978-1-78093-767-0
    The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, Oxford University Press, 1991.
    • Angelos
    • Irene (Palaiologos?)
    • Isaac II Angelos
    • Alexios III Angelos
  5. Alexios IV Angelos — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Alexios_IV_Angelos

    Alexios IV Angelos or Alexius IV Angelus (Greek: Αλέξιος Δ' Άγγελος) (c. 1182 – 8 February 1204) was Byzantine Emperor from August 1203 to January 1204. He was the son of Emperor Isaac II Angelos and his first wife, an unknown Palaiologina, who became a nun with the name Irene. His paternal uncle was his predecessor Emperor Alexios III Angelos.

  6. Alexios IV Angelos - Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core

    infogalactic.com › info › Alexios_IV_Angelos
    • Prince in Exile
    • Emperor
    • Deposition and Death
    • References

    The young Alexios was imprisoned in 1195 when Alexios III overthrew Isaac II in a coup. In 1201, two Pisan merchants were employed to smuggle Alexius out of Constantinople to the Holy Roman Empire, where he took refuge with his brother-in-law Philip of Swabia, King of Germany. According to the contemporary account of Robert of Clari it was while Alexius was at Swabia's court that he met with Marquis Boniface of Montferrat, Philip's cousin, who had been chosen to lead the Fourth Crusade, but had temporarily left the Crusade during the siege of Zara to visit Philip. Boniface and Alexios allegedly discussed diverting the Crusade to Constantinople so that Alexios could be restored to his father's throne. Montferrat returned to the Crusade while it wintered at Zara and he was shortly followed by Prince Alexios's envoys who offered to the Crusaders 10,000 Byzantine soldiers to help fight in the Crusade, maintain 500 knights in the Holy Land, the service of the Byzantine navy (20 ships) in...

    On July 18, 1203 the Crusaders launched an assault on the city, and Alexios III immediately fled into Thrace. The next morning the Crusaders were surprised to find that the citizens had released Isaac II from prison and proclaimed him emperor, despite the fact that he had been blinded to make him ineligible to rule. The Crusaders could not accept this, and forced Isaac II to proclaim his son Alexios IV co-emperor on August 1. Despite Alexios' grand promises, Isaac, the more experienced and practical of the two, knew that the Crusaders' debt could never be repaid from the imperial treasury. Alexios, however, had apparently not grasped how far the empire's financial resources had fallen during the previous fifty years. Alexios did manage to raise half the sum promised (100,000 silver marks), by appropriating treasures from the church and by confiscating the property of his enemies. He then attempted to defeat his uncle Alexios III, who remained in control of Thrace. The sack of some T...

    At the end of January 1204, the populace of Constantinople rebelled and tried to proclaim a rival emperor in Hagia Sophia. Alexios IV attempted to reach a reconciliation with the Crusaders, entrusting the anti-western courtier Alexios Doukas Murzuphlus with a mission to gain Crusader support. However, Alexios Doukas imprisoned both Alexios IV and his father on the night of January 27–28, 1204. Isaac II died soon afterwards, possibly of old age or from poison, and Alexios IV was strangled on February 8. Alexios Doukas was proclaimed emperor as Alexios V. During Alexios IV's brief reign, the empire lost its territories along the Black Sea coast to the Empire of Trebizond.

    Angold, Michael, The Fourth Crusade(London and New York, 2004).
    Brand, C.M., 'A Byzantine Plan for the Fourth Crusade', Speculum, 43 (1968), pp. 462–75.
    Harris, Jonathan, Byzantium and the Crusades (2nd ed. London and New York, 2014). ISBN 978-1-78093-767-0
    The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, Oxford University Press, 1991.
  7. Alexios IV Angelus - Wikipedia bahasa Indonesia, ensiklopedia ...

    id.m.wikipedia.org › wiki › Alexios_IV_Angelos

    Harris, Jonathan, Byzantium and the Crusades (London and New York, 2003). The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, Oxford University Press, 1991. Phillips, Jonathan, The Fourth Crusade And The Sack Of Constantinople (London and New York, 2004). Plate, William (1867). "Alexios IV Angelos". Dalam William Smith.

  8. Alexios III Angelos - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Alexios_III_Angelos

    Alexios IV Angelos, the son of the deposed Isaac II, had recently escaped from Constantinople and now appealed for support to the crusaders, promising to end the East-West Schism, to pay for their transport, and to provide military support if they would help him depose his uncle and ascend to his father's throne.

  9. Alexius IV Angelus - Phantis

    wiki.phantis.com › index › Alexius_IV_Angelus

    Alexios IV Angelos or Alexius IV Angelus (Greek: Αλέξιος Δ' Άγγελος) (c. 1182-February 8, 1204) was Byzantine Emperor from August 1203 to January 1204. He was the son of emperor Isaac II Angelos and his first wife Eirene (Herina).

  10. Byzantine Empire under the Angelos dynasty - The Reader Wiki ...

    thereaderwiki.com › en › Byzantine_Empire_under_the

    Isaac II Angelos • 1195–1203 ... Alexios IV • 1204 Alexios V • 1204 Constantine Laskaris: History • Deposition of Andronikos I. 1185

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