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  1. Alexios IV Angelos - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexios_IV_Angelos

    Alexios IV Angelos or Alexius IV Angelus (Greek: Αλέξιος Δ' Άγγελος) (c. 1182 – 8 February 1204) was Byzantine Emperor from August 1203 to January 1204. He was the son of Emperor Isaac II Angelos and his first wife, an unknown Palaiologina, who became a nun with the name Irene.

  2. Alexios IV Angelos | Project Gutenberg Self-Publishing ...

    self.gutenberg.org/articles/eng/Alexios_IV_Angelos

    Alexios IV Angelos or Alexius IV Angelus (Greek: Αλέξιος Δ' Άγγελος) (c. 1182 – February 8, 1204) was Byzantine Emperor from August 1203 to January 1204. He was the son of Emperor Isaac II Angelus and his first wife, an unknown Palaiologina? who became nun with the name Irene. His paternal uncle was Emperor Alexius III Angelus.

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  4. Alexios IV Angelos : definition of Alexios IV Angelos and ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/Alexios IV Angelos/en-en

    Harris, Jonathan, Byzantium and the Crusades (London and New York, 2003). The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, Oxford University Press, 1991. Phillips, Jonathan, The Fourth Crusade And The Sack Of Constantinople (London and New York, 2004). Plate, William (1867). "Alexios IV Angelos". In William Smith.

  5. Alexios IV Angelos | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org/wiki/Alexios_IV_Angelos
    • Prince in Exile
    • Emperor
    • Deposition and Death
    • References

    The young Alexios was imprisoned in 1195 when Alexios III overthrew Isaac II in a coup. In 1201, two Pisan merchants were employed to smuggle Alexius out of Constantinople to the Holy Roman Empire, where he took refuge with his brother-in-law Philip of Swabia, King of Germany. While there he met with Marquis Boniface of Montferrat, Philip's cousin, who had been chosen to lead the Fourth Crusade, but had temporarily left the Crusade during the siege of Zara to visit Philip. Boniface and Alexios discussed diverting the Crusade to Constantinople so that Alexios could be restored to his father's throne; in return, Alexios would give them 10,000 Byzantine soldiers to help fight in the Crusade, maintain 500 knights in the Holy Land, the service of the Byzantine navy (20 ships) in transporting the Crusader army to Egypt, as well as money to pay off the Crusaders' debt to the Republic of Venicewith 200,000 silver marks. Additionally, he promised to bring the Greek Orthodox Church under the...

    On July 18, 1203 the Crusaders launched an assault on the city, and Alexios III immediately fled into Thrace. The next morning the Crusaders were surprised to find that the citizens had released Isaac II from prison and proclaimed him emperor, despite the fact that he had been blinded to make him ineligible to rule. The Crusaders could not accept this, and forced Isaac II to proclaim his son Alexios IV co-emperor on August 1. Despite Alexios' grand promises, Isaac, the more experienced and practical of the two, knew that the Crusaders' debt could never be repaid from the imperial treasury. Alexios, however, had apparently not grasped how far the empire's financial resources had fallen during the previous fifty years. Alexios did manage to raise half the sum promised (100,000 silver marks), by appropriating treasures from the church and by confiscating the property of his enemies. He then attempted to defeat his uncle Alexios III, who remained in control of Thrace. The sack of some T...

    At the end of January 1204, the populace of Constantinople rebelled and tried to proclaim a rival emperor in Hagia Sophia. Alexios IV attempted to reach a reconciliation with the Crusaders, entrusting the anti-western courtier Alexios Doukas Murzuphluswith a mission to gain Crusader support. However, Alexios Doukas imprisoned both Alexios IV and his father on the night of January 27–28, 1204. Isaac II died soon afterwards, possibly of old age or from poison, and Alexios IV was strangled on February 8. Alexios Doukas was proclaimed emperor as Alexios V. During Alexios IV's brief reign, the empire lost its territories along the Black Sea coast to the Empire of Trebizond.

    Angold, Michael, The Fourth Crusade(London and New York, 2004).
    Brand, C.M., 'A Byzantine Plan for the Fourth Crusade', Speculum, 43 (1968), pp. 462–75.
    Harris, Jonathan, Byzantium and the Crusades(London and New York, 2003).
    The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, Oxford University Press, 1991.
  6. Alexios IV Angelus - Wikipedia bahasa Indonesia, ensiklopedia ...

    id.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexios_IV_Angelus

    Harris, Jonathan, Byzantium and the Crusades (London and New York, 2003). The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, Oxford University Press, 1991. Phillips, Jonathan, The Fourth Crusade And The Sack Of Constantinople (London and New York, 2004). Plate, William (1867). "Alexios IV Angelos". Dalam William Smith.

  7. Alexios III Angelos - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexios_III_Angelos

    Alexios IV Angelos, the son of the deposed Isaac II, had recently escaped from Constantinople and now appealed for support to the crusaders, promising to end the East-West Schism, to pay for their transport, and to provide military support if they would help him depose his uncle and ascend to his father's throne.

  8. Alexios IV Angelos (c1182-1204) | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/Alexios_IV_Angelos_(c...
    • Prince in Exile
    • Emperor
    • Deposition and Death
    • in Popular Culture
    • References

    The young Alexios was imprisoned in 1195 when Alexios III overthrew Isaac II in a coup. In 1201, two Pisan merchants were employed to smuggle Alexius out of Constantinople to the Holy Roman Empire, where he took refuge with his brother-in-law Philip of Swabia, King of Germany. According to the contemporary account of Robert of Clari it was while Alexius was at Swabia's court that he met with Marquis Boniface of Montferrat, Philip's cousin, who had been chosen to lead the Fourth Crusade, but had temporarily left the Crusade during the siege of Zara to visit Philip. Boniface and Alexios allegedly discussed diverting the Crusade to Constantinople so that Alexios could be restored to his father's throne. Montferrat returned to the Crusade while it wintered at Zara and he was shortly followed by Prince Alexios's envoys who offered to the Crusaders 10,000 Byzantine soldiers to help fight in the Crusade, maintain 500 knights in the Holy Land, the service of the Byzantine navy (20 ships) in...

    On 18 July 1203 the Crusaders launched an assault on the city, and Alexios III immediately fled into Thrace. The next morning the Crusaders were surprised to find that the citizens had released Isaac II from prison and proclaimed him emperor, despite the fact that he had been blinded to make him ineligible to rule. The Crusaders could not accept this, and forced Isaac II to proclaim his son Alexios IV co-emperor on 1 August. Despite Alexios' grand promises, Isaac, the more experienced and practical of the two, knew that the Crusaders' debt could never be repaid from the imperial treasury. Alexios, however, had apparently not grasped how far the empire's financial resources had fallen during the previous fifty years. Alexios did manage to raise half the sum promised (100,000 silver marks), by appropriating treasures from the church and by confiscating the property of his enemies. He then attempted to defeat his uncle Alexios III, who remained in control of Thrace. The sack of some Th...

    At the end of January 1204, the populace of Constantinople rebelled and tried to proclaim a rival emperor in Hagia Sophia. Alexios IV attempted to reach a reconciliation with the Crusaders, entrusting the anti-western courtier Alexios Doukas Murzuphlus with a mission to gain Crusader support. However, Alexios Doukas imprisoned both Alexios IV and his father on the night of 27–28 January 1204. Isaac II died soon afterwards, possibly of old age or from poison, and Alexios IV was strangled on 8 February. Alexios Doukas was proclaimed emperor as Alexios V. During Alexios IV's brief reign, the empire lost its territories along the Black Sea coast to the Empire of Trebizond.

    Alexios IV is mentioned in the "Map of the Seven Knights" episode of the 5th season of the Grimm TV series. He is mentioned as a pro-Crusader. In Soviet historiography, the opinion was affirmed that the Chernigov princess Yevfimiya Glebovnawas intended as Alexios's wife, but she probably died before the marriage and the events of 1195, which changed the political situation in Byzantium.

    Angold, Michael, The Fourth Crusade(London and New York, 2004).
    Brand, C.M., 'A Byzantine Plan for the Fourth Crusade', Speculum, 43 (1968), pp. 462–75.
    Harris, Jonathan, Byzantium and the Crusades (2nd ed. London and New York, 2014). ISBN 978-1-78093-767-0
    The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, Oxford University Press, 1991.
  9. Angelos - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelos

    Alexios' brother Manuel Angelos Philanthropenos was the last Byzantine Greek ruler of Thessaly. After the Ottoman conquest of Thessaly in 1394, the Angeloi Philanthropenoi took refuge in Serbia . A grandson of either Alexios or Manuel, Mihailo Anđelović , served as an official at the court of Đurađ and Lazar Branković .

  10. Alexios III Angelos | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org/wiki/Alexios_III_Angelos
    • Early Life
    • Reign
    • Fourth Crusade
    • Life in Exile
    • Family
    • References

    Alexios III Angelos was the second son of Andronikos Doukas Angelos and Euphrosyne Kastamonitissa. Andronikos was himself a son of Theodora Komnene, the youngest daughter of Emperor Alexios I Komnenos and Irene Doukaina. Thus Alexios Angelos was a member of the extended imperial family. Together with his father and brothers, Alexios had conspired against Emperor Andronikos I Komnenos (c.1183), and thus he spent several years in exile in Muslim courts, including that of Saladin. His younger brother Isaac was threatened with execution under orders of Andronikos I, their first-cousin once-removed, on September 11, 1185. Isaac made a desperate attack on the imperial agents and soon killed their leader Stephen Hagiochristophorites. He then took refuge in the church of Hagia Sophiaand from there appealed to the populace. His actions provoked a riot, which resulted in the deposition of Andronikos I and the proclamation of Isaac as Emperor. Alexios was now closer to the imperial throne than...

    By 1190 Alexios had returned to the court of his younger brother, from whom he received the elevated title of sebastokratōr. In March 1195 while Isaac II was away hunting in Thrace, Alexios was acclaimed as emperor by the troops with the covert support of Alexios' wife Euphrosyne Doukaina Kamatera. Alexios captured Isaac at Stagira in Macedonia, put out his eyes, and thenceforth kept him a close prisoner, despite having previously been redeemed by Alexios from captivity at Antioch and showered with honours. To compensate for this crime and to solidify his position as emperor, Alexios had to scatter money so lavishly as to empty his treasury, and to allow such licence to the officers of the army as to leave the Empire practically defenceless. These actions inevitably led to the financial ruin of the state. At Christmas 1196, Holy Roman Emperor Henry VI attempted to force Alexios to pay him a tribute of 5,000 pounds (later negotiated down to 1,600 pounds) of gold or face invasion. Ale...

    Soon Alexios was threatened by a new and more formidable danger. In 1202, soldiers assembled at Venice to launch the Fourth Crusade. Alexios IV Angelos, the son of the deposed Isaac II, had recently escaped from Constantinople and now appealed for support to the crusaders, promising to end the schism of East and West, to pay for their transport, and to provide military support if they would help him depose his uncle and ascend to his father's throne. The crusaders, whose objective had been Egypt, were persuaded to set their course for Constantinople, arriving there in June 1203, proclaiming Alexios IV as Emperor, and inviting the populace of the capital to depose his uncle. Alexios III took no effective measures to resist, and his attempts to bribe the crusaders failed. His son-in-law, Theodore Laskaris, who was the only one to attempt anything significant, was defeated at Scutari, and the siege of Constantinople began. Unfortunately for the city, misgovernment by Alexios III had le...

    Alexios III attempted to organize resistance to the new regime from Adrianople and then Mosynopolis, where he was joined by the later usurper Alexios V Doukas Mourtzouphlos in April 1204, after the definitive fall of Constantinople to the crusaders and the establishment of the Latin Empire. At first Alexios III received Alexios V well, even allowing him to marry his daughter Eudokia Angelina. Later Alexios V was blinded and deserted by his father-in-law, who fled from the crusaders into Thessaly. Here Alexios III eventually surrendered, with Euphrosyne, to Marquis Boniface of Montferrat, who was establishing himself as ruler of the Kingdom of Thessalonica. Alexios III attempted to escape Boniface's "protection" in 1205, seeking shelter with Michael I Komnenos Doukas, the ruler of Epirus. Captured by Boniface, Alexios and his retinue were sent to Montferrat before being brought back to Thessalonica in c.1209. At that point the deposed emperor was ransomed by Michael I, who sent him t...

    By his marriage to Euphrosyne Doukaina Kamatera, Alexios had three daughters: 1. Eirene Angelina, who married (1) Andronikos Kontostephanos, and (2) Alexios Palaiologos, by whom she was the grandmother of Emperor Michael VIII Palaiologos. 2. Anna Angelina, who married (1) the sebastokratōr Isaac Komnenos, great-nephew of emperor Manuel I Komnenos, and (2) Theodore Laskaris, emperor of Nicaea. 3. Eudokia Angelina, who married (1) Serbian King Stefan Nemanjić, then (2) Emperor Alexios V Doukas, and (3) Leo Sgouros, ruler of Corinth.

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Bury, John Bagnell (1911) "Alexius III." in Chisholm, Hugh Encyclopædia Britannica 1(11th ed.) Cambridge University Press...
    C.M. Brand, Byzantium Confronts the West(Cambridge, MA, 1968)
    Finley, Jr., John H. (1932). "Corinth in the Middle Ages".
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