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  1. Requiem (Mozart) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Requiem_(Mozart)

    The Requiem in D minor, K. 626, is a requiem mass by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756–1791). Mozart composed part of the Requiem in Vienna in late 1791, but it was unfinished at his death on 5 December the same year.

  2. Requiem (Mozart) – Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre

    pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Requiem_(Mozart)

    História. Em 14 de Fevereiro de 1791, Anna Walsegg, esposa de Franz von Walsegg falece aos seus 20 anos.Em Julho do mesmo ano, bateu à porta de Mozart um desconhecido (possivelmente Franz Anton Leitgeb ou Johann Nepomuk Sortschan) a mando de Walsegg, que desejava uma missa de réquiem para o memorial de sua falecida esposa, mas que planejava dizer que fora ele quem compôs a obra (por isso o ...

    • Mozart / Collegium Aureum, 1970: Requiem in D Minor, K.626 - Complete - Gerhard Schmidt-Gaden
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    • (Complete) Mozart Requiem, K. 626 - CM Giulini, 1979 - Philharmonia Orchestra (Indexed) - Vinyl LP
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    • Verdi: Messa di Requiem Abbado, Scotto, Horne, Pavarotti, Ghiaurov Roma 1970
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    • Mozart - Requiem
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  4. Requiem - Vicipaedia

    la.wikipedia.org/wiki/Requiem

    Agnus Dei ante reformationem liturgicam anni 1970 verborum formula ab ordinario diversa cantabatur. Loco bis cantati "miserere nobis" et "dona nobis pacem" antea ter "Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, dona eis requiem" cantatum est, tertium verbo "sempiternam" adiecto, quod salvificus missae pro defunctis effectus non vivis praesentibus, sed ...

  5. Requiem (Mozart) | Classical Music Wiki | Fandom

    classicalmusic.fandom.com/wiki/Requiem_(Mozart)
    • History
    • Timeline
    • Structure
    • Influences
    • Myths Surrounding The Requiem
    • The Autograph at The 1958 World's Fair
    • Structure and Text

    Composition

    At the time of Mozart's death on 5 December 1791, only the opening movement (Requiem aeternam) was completed in all of the orchestral and vocal parts. The following Kyrie and most of the sequence (from Dies Irae to Confutatis) were complete only in the vocal parts and the continuo (the figured organ bass), though occasionally some of the prominent orchestral parts were briefly indicated, such as the first violin part of the Rex tremendae and Confutatis and the musical bridges in the Recordare...

    Constanze Mozart and the Requiem after Mozart's death

    The eccentric count Franz von Walsegg commissioned the Requiem from Mozart anonymously through intermediaries. The count, an amateur chamber musician who routinely commissioned works by composers and passed them off as his own,[1][2] wanted a Requiem Mass he could claim he composed to memorialize the recent passing of his wife. Mozart received only half of the payment in advance, so upon his death his widow Constanze was keen to have the work completed secretly by someone else, submit it to t...

    Modern completions

    In the 1960s a sketch for an Amen fugue was discovered, which some musicologists (Levin, Maunder) believe belongs to the Requiem at the conclusion of thesequence after the Lacrymosa. H. C. Robbins Landon argues that this Amen fugue was not intended for the Requiem, rather that it "may have been for a separate unfinished Mass in D minor" to which the Kyrie K. 341 also belonged. There is, however, compelling evidence placing the "Amen Fugue" in the Requiem[9] based on current Mozart scholarship...

    This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2012)*January 2, 1772: Mozart participates in the premiere of Michael Haydn's Requiem in C minor.[12] 1. February 14, 1791: Anna, Count von Walsegg'swife, dies at the age of 20. 2. mid-July: A messenger (probably Franz Anton Leitgeb, the count's steward) arrives with note asking Mozart to write a Requiem Mass. 3. mid-July: Commission from Domenico Guardasoni, impresario of the Prague National Theatre to compose the opera, La clemenza di Tito(K. 621), for the festivities surrounding the coronation on September 6 of Leopold II as King of Bohemia. 4. August: Mozart works mainly on La clemenza di Tito; completed by September 5. 5. August 25: Mozart leaves for Prague. 6. September 6: Mozart conducts premiere of La clemenza di Tito. 7. mid-September – September 28: Revision and completion of The Magi...

    Play audio file The Süssmayr completion of the Requiemis divided into fourteen movements, with the following structure: Bars 1–5 of the Lacrimosa*I. Introitus 1. 1.1. Requiem (choir and sopranosolo) (D minor) Play audio file Kyrie, Bruno Walter, 1956.*II. Kyrie(choir) (D minor) 1. III. Sequentia (text based on sections of the Dies Irae) 1.1. Dies irae (choir) (D minor) 1.2. Tuba mirum (soprano, contralto, tenor and basssolo) (B-flat major) 1.3. Rex tremendae (choir) (G minor–D minor) 1.4. Recordare (soprano, contralto, tenor and bass solo) (F major) 1.5. Confutatis (choir) (A minor–F major, last chord V of D minor) 1.6. Lacrimosa(choir) (D minor) 2. IV. Offertorium 1. 1.1. Domine Jesu (choir with solo quartet) (G minor) 1.2. Hostias (choir) (E-flat major–G minor) 2. V. Sanctus(choir) (D major) 3. VI. Benedictus (solo quartet and choir) (B-flat major) 4. VII. Agnus Dei(choir) (D minor–B-flat major) 5. VIII. Communio 1. 1.1. Lux aeterna (soprano solo and choir) (B-flat major–D minor)...

    Mozart esteemed Handel and in 1789 he was commissioned by Baron Gottfried van Swieten to rearrange Messiah. This work likely influenced the composition of Mozart's Requiem; the Kyrie is probably based on the And with his stripes we are healed chorus from Handel's Messiah (HWV 56), since the subject of the fugato, in which Handel was a master, is the same, with only slight variations by adding ornaments on melismata. Some believe that the Introitus was inspired by Handel's Funeral Anthem for Queen Caroline (HWV 264), and some have also remarked that the Confutatis may have been inspired by Sinfonia Venezia by Pasquale Anfossi. Another influence was Michael Haydn's Requiem in C minorwhich he and his father heard at the first three performances in January 1772. Some have noted that M. Haydn's "Introitus" sounds rather similar to Mozart's, and the theme for the fugue of Mozart's Offertorium No. 1 is a direct quote of the theme of M. Haydn's Offertorium and Versus.

    With multiple levels of deception surrounding the Requiem's completion, a natural outcome is the mythologizing which subsequently occurred. One series of myths surrounding the Requiem involves the role Antonio Salieri played in the commissioning and completion of the Requiem (and in Mozart's death generally). While the most recent retelling of this myth is Peter Shaffer's play Amadeus and the movie made from it, it is important to note that the source of misinformation was actually a 19th-century play by Alexander Pushkin, Mozart and Salieri, which was turned into an opera by Rimsky-Korsakov and subsequently used as the framework forAmadeus.[14]

    The autograph of the Requiem was placed on display at the World's Fair in 1958 in Brussels. At some point during the fair, someone was able to gain access to the manuscript, tearing off the bottom right-hand corner of the second to last page (folio 99r/45r), containing the words "Quam olim d: C:" (an instruction that the "Quam olim" fugue of the Domine Jesu was to be repeated "da capo", at the end of the Hostias). The perpetrator has not been identified and the fragment has not been recovered.[15] If the most common authorship theory is true, then "Quam olim d: C:" might very well be the last words Mozart wrote before he died. It is probable that whoever stole the fragment believed that to be the case.

    Kyrie

    Kyrie, eleison. Christe, eleison. Kyrie, eleison.

  6. Requiem (Mozart) | Pop Culture Wiki | Fandom

    pop-culture.fandom.com/wiki/Requiem_(Mozart)

    Template:More footnotes Template:Infobox musical composition The Requiem in D minor, K. 626, is a requiem mass by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Mozart composed part of the Requiem in Vienna in late 1791, but it was unfinished at his death on 5 December the same year. A completed version dated 1792 by Franz Xaver Süssmayr was delivered to Count Franz von Walsegg, who commissioned the piece for a ...

  7. Requiem | Discogs

    www.discogs.com/Mozart-Sheila-Armstrong-Janet...

    Discover releases, reviews, track listings, recommendations, and more about Mozart*, Sheila Armstrong • Janet Baker • Nicolai Gedda • Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, John Alldis Choir & English Chamber Orchestra Conducted By Daniel Barenboim - Requiem at Discogs.

  8. Mozart - Requiem: description -- Classic Cat

    www.classiccat.net/mozart_wa/626.info.php
    • History
    • Timeline
    • Structure
    • Influences
    • Myths Surrounding The Requiem
    • The Autograph at The 1958 World's Fair
    • Bibliography

    Composition

    At the time of Mozart's death on 5 December 1791, only the opening movement (Requiem aeternam) was completed in all of the orchestral and vocal parts. The following Kyrie (a double fugue) and most of the sequence (from Dies Irae to Confutatis) were complete only in the vocal parts and the continuo (the figured organ bass), though occasionally some of the prominent orchestral parts have been briefly indicated, such as the violin part of the Confutatis and the musical bridges in the Recordare....

    Constanze Mozart and the Requiem after Mozart's death

    The eccentric count Franz von Walsegg commissioned the Requiem from Mozart anonymously through intermediaries acting on his behalf. The count, an amateur chamber musician who routinely commissioned works by composers and passed them off as his own, wanted a Requiem mass he could claim he composed to memorialize the recent passing of his wife. Mozart received only half of the payment in advance, so upon his death his widow Constanze was keen to have the work completed secretly by someone else,...

    Modern completions

    In the 1960s a sketch for an Amen fugue was discovered, which some musicologists (Levin, Maunder) believe belongs to the Requiem at the conclusion of the sequence after the Lacrimosa. H. C. Robbins Landon argues that this Amen fugue was not intended for the Requiem, rather that it "may have been for a separate unfinished Mass in D minor" to which the Kyrie K341 also belonged. There is, however, compelling evidence placing the "Amen Fugue" in the Requiem[5] based on current Mozart scholarship....

    January 2, 1772: Mozart participates in the premiere of Michael Haydn's Requiem in C minor.[6]
    February 14, 1791: Anna, Count von Walsegg'swife, died at the age of 20.
    mid-July: A messenger (probably Franz Anton Leitgeb, the count's steward) arrived with note asking Mozart to write a Requiem Mass.
    mid-July: Commission from Domenico Guardasoni, impresario of the Prague National Theater to compose the opera, La clemenza di Tito, for the festivities surrounding the coronation on September 6 of...

    The Sussmayr completion of the Requiemis divided into fourteen movements, with the following structure: 1. I. Introitus: Requiem aeternam (choir and sopranosolo) 2. II. Kyrie eleison(choir) 3. III. Sequentia (text based on sections of the Dies Irae): 3.1. Dies irae (choir) 3.2. Tuba mirum (soprano, contralto, tenor and basssolo) 3.3. Rex tremendae majestatis (choir) 3.4. Recordare, Jesu pie (soprano, contralto, tenor and bass solo) 3.5. Confutatis maledictis (choir) 3.6. Lacrimosa dies illa (choir) 4. IV. Offertorium: 4.1. Domine Jesu Christe (choir with solo quartet) 4.2. Versus: Hostias et preces (choir) 5. V. Sanctus: 5.1. Sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth (choir) 5.2. Benedictus (solo quartet, then choir) 6. VI. Agnus Dei(choir) 7. VII. Communio: 7.1. Lux aeterna (soprano solo and choir)

    Mozart esteemed Handel and in 1789 he was commissioned by baron Gottfried van Swieten to rearrange Messiah. This work likely influenced the composition of Mozart's Requiem; the Kyrie is probably based on the And with his stripes we are healed chorus from Handel's Messiah (HWV 56), since the fugato, in which Handel was a master, is the same, with only slight variations by adding ornaments on melismata. Some believe that the Introitus was inspired by Handel's Funeral Anthem for Queen Caroline (HWV 264), and some have also remarked that the Confutatis may have been inspired by Sinfonia Venezia by Pasquale Anfossi.

    The Requiem has a complex history, riddled with deception and manipulation of public opinion. The work was commissioned by Count Franz von Walsegg in July 1791 who wanted to pass off the work as his own,[7] so the circumstances of the commission were kept secret. Upon Mozart's death, Constanze had the work completed by other composers, but to receive final payment, their assistance had to remain a secret. At the same time, Constanze wanted to present the work as having been written by Mozart to completion, so as to receive revenue from the work. When it became known that others besides Mozart had a hand in writing the Requiem, Constanze insisted that Mozart left explicit instructions for the work's completion. With all of these levels of deceptions and secrets, it is inevitable that many myths would emerge with respect to the circumstances of the work's completion. One series of myths surrounding the Requiem involves the role Antonio Salieri played in the commissioning and completio...

    The autograph of the Requiem was placed on display at the World's Fair in 1958 in Brussels. At some point during the fair, someone was able to gain access to the manuscript, tearing off the bottom right-hand corner of the second to last page (folio 99r/45r), containing the words "Quam olim d: C:" (an instruction that the "Quam olim" fugue of the Domine Jesu was to be repeated "da capo", at the end of the Hostias). As of 2010[update] the perpetrator has not been identified and the fragment has not been recovered.[9] If the most common authorship theory is true, then "Quam olim d: C:" might very well be the last words Mozart wrote before he died. It is probable that whoever stole the fragment believed that to be the case. The Austrian author Gerhard Roth wrote a novel (Der Plan, 1998) whose plot is based, at its very beginning, on an alternative history of the stealing of the last words personally written by Mozart. According to Roth's version of this regrettable event, the manuscript...

    C. R. F. Maunder (1988). Mozart's Requiem: On Preparing a New Edition. Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN 0-19-316413-2.
    Christoph Wolff (1994). Mozart's Requiem: Historical and Analytical Studies, Documents, Score. Berkeley: University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-07709-1.
    Brendan Cormican (1991). Mozart's death – Mozart's requiem: an investigation. Belfast, Northern Ireland: Amadeus Press. ISBN 0-951-03570-3.
    Heinz Gärtner (1991). Constanze Mozart : after the Requiem. Portland, Oregon: Amadeus Press. ISBN 0-931-34039-X.
  9. James Gaffigan dirige l'Orchestre national de France et le Choeur de Radio France dans le Requiem en ré mineur K.626 de Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, avec la sopr...

  10. Amadeus (film) – Wikipédia

    hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amadeus_(film)

    Mozart: Requiem, KV 626: Rex tremendae majestatis, Academy of St. Martin in the Fields 2:06 29 Mozart: Requiem, KV 626: Confutatis, Academy of St. Martin in the Fields 2:21 30 Mozart: Requiem, KV 626: Lacrimosa, Academy of St. Martin in the Fields 3:47 31 Mozart: Klavierkonzert Nr. 20 in d-Moll, KV 466: 2. Satz Romance, Imogen Cooper 9:57

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