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    Should we identify gifted children with Asperger's syndrome?

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  2. much of Asperger's Syndrome echoes the behaviors of healthy highly gifted children that some of the first discussions of AS in the gifted community are cautions not to mistake giftedness for Asperger's Syndrome. Differentiating between AG and AS is simplified by remembering that Asperger's Syndrome is a

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  3. Oct 07, 2014 · Though widely supported, the new criteria for Asperger syndrom does not explain or acknowledge its notable coexistence with giftedness. Using fairly stringent criteria for giftedness (IQ>130), it has been speculated that as many as 7% of people with AS are gifted (Henderson, 2001). This is in comparison to the general population in which about 2% are considered gifted.

  4. Feb 22, 2004 · Comparing and Contrasting Asperger Syndrome and Giftedness Children with Asperger syndrome are often precocious in speaking and reading and tend to use sophisticated or formal language. They frequently have a remarkable memory, particularly for rote, factual information, and they are often passionately devoted to and eager to expound on topics of particular interest to them.

  5. Mar 16, 2018 · Gifted children with Asperger’s Syndrome. This article by Maureen Niehart suggests approaches for ...

    Differentiating Characteristic
    Ordinary Gifted
    Gifted With Asperger's Syndrom ...
    Speech Patterns
    Normal, but may have language ...
    Pedantic, seamless speech
    Response to Routines
    May passively resist, but will ...
    Very low tolerance for change, ...
    Disturbance of Attention
    If disturbance exists, it is u ...
    Disturbance is internal
    Humor
    Engages in socially reciprocal ...
    Can do word play, but typicall ...
    • Special Interests
    • Early Development
    • Cognitive Development
    • Social/Emotional Development
    • Helping Gifted Children with as to Achieve Their Potential
    • Conclusion
    • References and Other Books of Interest

    Like Gifted Children without AS, Gifted Children with AS: 1. Have absorbing interests and acquire large amounts of factual information about the interest. 2. Give lengthy and elaborate responses to questions in areas of knowledge and interest. 3. Are able to immerse themselves in material of interest and to hyperfocus so that they are unaware of the passage of time. 4. Have a rage and passion for learning. 5. Can be high achievers in a variety of fields including math, writing, literature, science, social studies, foreign languages, debating, drama, chess, music and art. Unlike Gifted Children without AS, Gifted Children with AS: 1. May collect information and categorize it but not connect it to anything else they are learning. They do not see the big picture and tend to focus on parts and patterns, not the underlying meaning. Thus, it is more difficult to see how a trend in one area may be like a trend in another. 2. Have excellent skills in many areas but are hindered by deficits...

    Like Gifted Children without AS, Gifted Children with AS: 1. Show similar precocious development of first words, development of full sentences, and develop extensive vocabularies. They have especially sophisticated vocabularies in areas of special interest. 2. Show early descriptive and factual memory that is advanced over age mates. 3. Are early readers, spellers, and mathematicians. Unlike gifted children without AS, Gifted Children with AS: 1. May show advanced reading skills but somewhat lower reading comprehension. This lag is especially notable for fiction as reading develops complexity and requires understanding human relationships, human dynamics and inferences based on emotion. Gifted children with AS have more trouble in analysis of literature for metaphor, irony, and in following a theme. They understand the action of the plot but not the nuances of character. Many prefer reading nonfiction for this reason.

    Like Gifted Children without AS, Gifted Children with AS: 1. Show advanced reasoning ability. They are often excellent at deductive and logical reasoning. 2. Are excellent at pattern recognition and sequential ordering of information, which allows flexible thinking about grouping information. Unlike gifted children without AS, Gifted Children with AS: 1. Show more difficulty with output of work, especially written work. Slow work speed and slow handwriting hinder output. Some process so slowly they produce very little work. 2. Have difficulty with work on demand. Even though they may be exceptional at producing work around their own interests, they cannot do assigned work unless they understand exactly what is expected. These gifted children need much more explanation and smaller steps than average children about what to do and how to do it. 3. Show subtle language problems. They have trouble understanding the meaning of common sayings (“Let’s make sure we’re all on the same page ab...

    Like Gifted Children without AS, Gifted Children with AS: 1. Show a high level of moral development. Concepts of fairness and justice can be advanced, showing advanced moral reasoning about issues related to fairness and justice. 2. Adhere to high ideals of following rules, being truthful, honest and fair. 3. Are more asynchronous than average children. There is a bigger gap between mental age and chronological age. Unlike gifted children without AS, Gifted Children with AS: 1. Have difficulty applying the rules in a flexible manner. They miss the social context and so apply rules rigidly. They don’t understand when not to apply a rule. 2. Fairness can mean, “What I want.” This is especially the case if they are rigidly locked into only seeing one aspect of a situation. Given what feels like only one choice, these children can panic and react badly. Also, due to a lack of ability to feel empathy, a concern for justice does not include a consideration of individual rights or circumst...

    Gifted children with AS need to learn how to negotiate social situations well enough to be able to have a job and live an independent adult life. Gifted children with mild AS need social training e...
    Gifted children with AS need the opportunity to develop their gifts. Because schoolwork is so time consuming and takes so much energy to complete, many gifted children with AS have nothing left to...
    These gifted children need mentors who understand how to work with bright AS children, especially creatively. The usual creativity projects at school do not fit the needs of gifted learners with AS...
    Gifted children with AS can accelerate in some subjects despite other deficit areas. Many gifted children with AS can spell any word, have extensive vocabularies and can easily learn to speak a for...

    Like other gifted children, those with AS have many talents and gifts. They learn rapidly and well, and can be uniquely creative. While it is vital that they learn to remediate and compensate for deficit areas in social and emotional functioning, it is also important that they be both allowed and encouraged to use their gifts in school. With encouragement and support, these gifted children can achieve their potential and make significant contributions to the world.

    Andron, L. (Ed.) (2001). Our Journey Through High Functioning Autism and Asperger Syndrome. London: Jessica Kingsley. Attwood, T. (1998). Asperger’s Syndrome: A Guide for Parents and Professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley. Gillberg, C. (2002). A Guide to Asperger Syndrome. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Gillberg, C. and Gillberg, I. C. (1989). Asperger syndrome - Some epidemiological considerations: A research note, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 30, 631-638. Grandin, T. (1995). Thinking in Pictures. New York: Doubleday. Haddon, M. (2003). The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. New York: Doubleday. Harris, P. L. and Leevers, H. J. (2000).Pretending, imagery and self-awareness in autism. In S. Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flusberg, and D. J. Cohen (Eds). Understanding Other Minds Second Edition(pp 182-202). New York: Oxford University Press. Hermelin, B. (2001). Bright Splinters of the Mind. London: Jessica Kingsley. Jackson, L. (2002). Freaks, Geeks and Asp...

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