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  1. Shalmaneser V ( Neo-Assyrian cuneiform: Salmānu-ašarēd, [2] [3] [4] meaning " Salmānu is foremost"; [3] Biblical Hebrew: שַׁלְמַנְאֶסֶר‎ Šalmanʾeser) was the king of the Neo-Assyrian Empire from the death of his father Tiglath-Pileser III in 727 BC to his deposition and death in 722 BC. Though Shalmaneser V's brief reign is poorly known from contemporary sources, he ...

  2. Shalmaneser V, king of Assyria (726-722 BC) The chosen heir of his father Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC), Shalmaneser V was king of Assyria and king of Babylon. But his reign lasted less than five years and ended in a succession war which brought his brother, Sargon II (721-705 BC), to power.

  3. Apr 20, 2024 · Shalmaneser’s Rise to Power In this scene, painted on the wall of the 8th century Assyrian palace of Hadattu (modern Arslan Tash) in Syria, king Tiglath-Pileser III (seated) receives a report from the crown prince Ululayu, who became king Shalmaneser V. This reconstruction on display in the Louvre.

  4. Shulmanu‐ashared, King of Assyria (727–722 BCE); otherwise known as Ululayu (“born in the month Ululu”). As son of his predecessor, Tiglath‐pileser III (745–727 BCE), Shalmaneser served as administrator in Calah ...

  5. Shalmaneser V ( Neo-Assyrian cuneiform: Salmānu-ašarēd, meaning " Salmānu is foremost"; Biblical Hebrew: שַׁלְמַנְאֶסֶר Šalmanʾeser) was the king of the Neo-Assyrian Empire from the death of his father Tiglath-Pileser III in 727 BC to his deposition and death in 722 BC. Though Shalmaneser V's brief reign is poorly known from contemporary sources, he remains known for the ...

  6. ancientmesopotamia.org › people › shalmaneser-VPeople | Shalmaneser V

    Shalmaneser V from Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum (Guillaume Rouillé, 1553)Shalmaneser V (Akkadian: Šulmanu-ašarid; Hebrew: שַׁלְמַנְאֶסֶר, Modern Shalman'eser, Tiberian Šalmanʼéser; Greek: Σαλαμανασσαρ Salamanassar; Latin: Salmanasar) was king of Assyria from 727 to 722 BC. He first appears as governor of ...

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  8. Since this eponymate is safely assigned to the second regnal year of Shalmaneser V, king of Assyria (725 BCE), the document strongly suggests that the region was under Assyrian provincial administration at that time; this scenario is not unexpected, since the Assyrian military advance and process of province-making had already reached this ...

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