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      • Adventures into Terror (1950–1954, Atlas Comics) Adventures into Weird Worlds (1952–1954, Atlas Comics) Adventures of Captain America (1991) Adventures of Cyclops & Phoenix (1994) Adventures of Homer Ghost (1957, Atlas Comics)
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    What does Atlas Comics stand for?

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  2. Atlas Comics is the 1950s comic-book publishing label that evolved into Marvel Comics. Magazine and paperback novel publisher Martin Goodman, whose business strategy involved having a multitude of corporate entities, used Atlas as the umbrella name for his comic-book division during this time. Atlas evolved out of Goodman's 1940s comic-book division, Timely Comics, and was located on the 14th floor of the Empire State Building. This company is distinct from the 1970s comic-book company, also fou

  3. Mar 18, 2019 · Marvel 80th Anniversary PARTY | Earth's Mightiest Show. For a brief seven-year period in the 1950s, publisher Martin Goodman’s Atlas Comics weathered the comics industry’s many storms to chart a course for its inheritor, Marvel Comics, to inaugurate a bold new era of innovation and creativity. Goodman had already spent the 1940s riding popular publishing trends as Timely Comics, but by 1951 launched his own distribution company to expand his empire ever more.

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    100 Greatest Marvels of All Time, The (2001)

    101 Ways to End the Clone Saga (1997)

    1602 (2003-2004)

    1602: New World (2005)

    1602: Fantastick Four (2006-2007)

    2-Gun Western (1956, Atlas Comics)

    A-1 (1992–1993, Epic)

    Abominations (1996)

    Abraham Stone (1995)

    Action Force (1987)

    Actual Confessions (1952, Atlas Comics)

    Actual Romances (1949–1950, Atlas Comics)

    Age of Apocalypse (All titles)

    Age of Heroes (2010)

    Age of Innocence: The Rebirth of Iron Man (1996)

    Age of the Sentry (2008–2009)

    Agents of Atlas, Vol. 1 (2006–2007)

    Agents of Atlas, Vol. 2 (2009)

    Amazing Adult Fantasy (1961–1962, Atlas Comics)

    Amazing Adventures, Vol. 1 (1961, Atlas Comics)

    Amazing Adventures, Vol. 2 (1970–1976)

    Amazing Adventures, Vol. 3 (1979–1981)

    Amazing Adventures, Vol. 4 (1988)

    Amazing Comics (1944, Atlas Comics)

    American Tail, An: Fievel Goes West (1992)

    A-Next (1998–1999)

    Angel (All titles)

    Angels of Destruction (1996, Malibu)

    Animated Movie Tunes (1945–1946, Atlas Comics)

    Animax (1986, Star Comics)

    Apache Kid (1950–1956, Atlas Comics)

    Apache Skies (2002, MAX)

    Arana: The Heart of the Spider (2005–2006, Marvel Next)

    Archangel (1996)

    Ares (2006, Marvel Knights)

    Arizona Kid (1951–1952, Atlas Comics)

    Arrgh! (1974–1975)

    Arrowhead (1954, Atlas Comics)

    Baby's First Deadpool Book (1996)

    Backpack Marvels (N/A) (list of Trade Paperback Books)

    Balder The Brave (1985–1986)

    Barbie (1991–1996)

    Barbie and Baby Sister Kelly (1995)

    Barbie Fashion (1991–1995)

    Beast (All Titles)

    Beauty and the Beast (Disney's) (1994–1995)

    Beavis and Butthead(1994–1996)

    Before the Fantastic Four: Ben Grimm and Logan (2000)

    Before the Fantastic Four: Reed Richards (2000)

    Before the Fantastic Four: The Storms (2000–2001)

    Bible Tales for Young Folk (1953–1954, Atlas Comics)

    Big Hero 6 (2008–2009)

    Biker Mice from Mars (1993–1994)

    Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey (1991)

    Bill & Ted's Excellent Comic Book (1991–1992)

    Billy Buckskin (1955–1956, Atlas)

    Black Axe (1993, Marvel UK)

    Black Dragon, The (1985, Epic)

    Black Goliath (1976)

    Black Knight, Vol. 1 (1955–1956, Atlas Comics)

    Black Knight, Vol. 2 (1990)

    Black Knight, Vol. 3 (2009)

    Book of Lost Souls (2005–2006, Icon)

    Book of the Damned (1991–1993)

    Book of the Dead (1993–1994)

    Books of Doom (2006)

    Born (2003, Marvel Max)

    Bozz Chronicles (1985–1986, Epic)

    Brats Bizarre (1994, Epic)

    Breaking Into Comics the Marvel Way! (2010)

    Break-Thru (1993–1994, Malibu)

    Brotherhood, The (2001–2002)

    Buck Duck (1953, Atlas Comics)

    Buckaroo Banzai (1984–1985)

    Bug (1997)

    Bullet Points (2007)

    Bullseye: Greatest Hits (2004–2005, Marvel Knights)

    Bullwinkle and Rocky (1987–1989, Star Comics)

    Cable (All titles)

    Cable & Deadpool (2004–2008)

    Cadillacs and Dinosaurs (1990–1991, Epic)

    Cage, Vol. 1 (1992–1993)

    Cage, Vol. 2 (2002, MAX)

    Call, The (2003)

    Century: Distant Sons (1996)

    Chamber (2002–2003, Icons)

    Chamber of Chills (1972–1976)

    Chamber of Darkness (1969–1972)

    Champions, The (1975–1978)

    Children of the Voyager (1993)

    Chili (1969–1973)

    Cindy Comics (1947–1950, Atlas Comics)

    Cindy Smith (1950, Atlas Comics)

    Citizen V and the V-Battalion (2001)

    Citizen V and the V-Battalion: The Everlasting (2002)

    Civil War (2006–2007)

    Civil War: House of M (2008–2009)

    Clandestine, Vol. 1 (1994–1995)

    Clandestine, Vol. 2 (2008)

    Classic Punisher (1989)

    Classic X-Men (1986–1990)

    Claws (2006)

    Clive Barker's: Book of the Damned (1991, Epic)

    Code of Honor (1997)

    Codename: Firearm (1995, Malibu)

    Codename: Genetix (1993, Marvel UK)

    Codename: Spitfire (1987, New Universe)

    Colossus

    Combat (1952–1953, Atlas)

    Craptacular B-Sides (2002–2003)

    Crash Ryan (1984–1985, Epic)

    Crazy (All titles)

    Creatures on the Loose (1971–1975)

    Crimson Dawn (1997)

    Crew (2003–2004)

    Cupid (1949–1950, Atlas Comics)

    Curse of Rune (1995, Malibu)

    Curse of the Weird (1993–1994)

    Cutting Edge (1995)

    Cyberspace 3000 (1993–1994, Marvel UK)

    Cyclops (All titles)

    Daily Bugle Vol 1 (1996–1997)

    Daken: Dark Wolverine Vol 1 (2010-current)

    Dakota North Vol 1 (1986–1987)

    Damage Control (All titles)

    Dances with Demons Vol 1 (1993)

    Daredevil (All titles)

    Dead of Night Vol 1 (1973–1975)

    Dead of Night Featuring Devil-Slayer Vol 1 (2008)

    Dead of Night Featuring Man-Thing Vol 1 (2008)

    Deadliest Heroes of Kung Fu Vol 1 (1975)

    Deadline Vol 1 (2002)

    The Deadly Foes of Spider-Man Vol 1 (1991)

    Die Cut Vol 1 (1993–1994, Marvel UK)

    Die-Cut vs G-Force Vol 1 (1993, Marvel UK)

    Digitek Vol 1 (1992–1993, Marvel UK)

    Dino Riders Vol 1 (1988–1989)

    Dippy Duck Vol 1 (1957, Atlas)

    Disney Afternoon Vol 1 (1994–1995)

    X-Women Vol 1 (2010)

    X-Women Vol 1 (2010)

    X-Women Vol 1 (2010)

    X-Women Vol 1 (2010)

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    • After The Golden Age
    • Trend-Following
    • Humor and Miscellanea
    • Atlas Shrugs
    • Return of Jack Kirby
    • Pre-Superhero Marvel
    • Quotes
    • Atlas Titles by Genre
    • References

    Atlas grew out of Timely Comics, the company Goodman founded in 1939 and whose star characters during the 1930s and '40s Golden Age of comic books were the Human Torch, the Sub-Mariner, and Captain America. The post-war era, however, found superheroes falling out of fashion. Television and paperback books now also competed for readers and leisure t...

    Atlas, rather than similarly innovate, took what it saw as the proven route of following popular trends in TV and movies — Westerns and war dramas prevailing for a time, drive-in movie monsters another time — and even other comic books, particularly the EC horror line. Until the early 1960s, when editor-in-chief and head writer Stan Lee would help ...

    Atlas also published a plethora of children's and teen humor titles, including Dan DeCarlo's Homer, the Happy Ghost (a la Casper the Friendly Ghost) and Homer Hooper (a la Archie Andrews). If newspapers had Dennis the Menace, Atlas had the Joe Maneely-drawn Melvin the Monster. TV had Sgt. Bilko? Atlas had the lovably conniving Sergeant Barney Barke...

    From 1952 to late 1956, Goodman distributed this torrent of comics to newsstands through his self-owned distributor, Atlas. He then switched to American News Company, the nation's largest distributor and a virtual monopoly—which shortly afterward lost a Justice Department lawsuit and discontinued its business. As historian and author Gerard Jones e...

    Goodman's men's magazines and paperback books were still successful — the comics, except in the early Golden Age, were a relatively small part of the business — and Goodman considered shutting the division down. The details of his decision not to do so are murky. Jack Kirby, who after his amicable split with creative partner Joe Simon a few years e...

    The exact point at which "Atlas" began to be considered "Marvel" has never been definitively established. Goodman had begun moving away from newsstand distributor Kable News by branding his comics with the Atlas globe on issues cover-dated Nov. 1951, even though Kable's "K" logo and North American map symbol remained through the Aug. 1952 issues. G...

    Stan Goldberg on the Atlas Comics staff: "I was in the Bullpen with a lot of well-known artists who worked up there at that time. We had our Bullpen up there until about 1958 or '59. [sic; the Bullpen staff was let go in 1957] The guys ... who actually worked nine-to-five and put in a regular day, and not the freelance guys who'd come in a drop off...

    Information from Atlas Tales and other references. Some titles may be arguably Timely at the earlier end, or Marvel at the later end. Note: In titles numbered from or into the various All Winners Comics, additional clarifying information is supplied. List, in progress, complete through L.

    • After the Golden Age
    • Trend-following
    • Humor and miscellanea
    • Layoffs
    • Pre-superhero Marvel
    • Atlas titles by type
    • References
    • External links

    Atlas Comics grew out of Timely Comics, the company Goodman founded in 1939 and whose star characters during the 1930s and 1940s Golden Age of comic books were the Human Torch, the Sub-Mariner, and Captain America. The post-war era, however, found superheroes falling out of fashion. Television and paperback books now also competed for readers and leisure time.

    Timely stopped producing superhero comics with the cancellation of Captain America Comics at issue #75 (Feb. 1950) — by which time the se

    Goodman's publishing strategy for Atlas involved what he saw as the proven route of following popular trends in TV and movies — Westerns and war dramas prevailing for a time, drive-in movie monsters another time — and even other comic books, particularly the EC horror line. As Marvel/Atlas editor-in-chief Stan Lee told historian Les Daniels, Goodma...

    Atlas also published a plethora of children's and teen humor titles, including Dan DeCarlo's Homer, the Happy Ghost (a la Casper the Friendly Ghost), Homer Hooper (a la Archie Andrews) and the Joe Maneely-drawn Melvin the Monster (a la Dennis the Menace). Sergeant Barney Barker, drawn by John Severin, was Atlas' answer to Sgt. Bilko.

    One of the most long-running titles was Millie the Model, which began as a Timely Comics humor book in 1945 and ran a remarkable 207 issues, well into the Marvel-er

    From 1952 to late 1956, Goodman distributed this torrent of comics to newsstands through his self-owned distributor, the Atlas News Company. He shut this down in 1956, and began newsstand distribution through American News Company, the nation's largest distributor and a virtual monopoly — which shortly afterward lost a Justice Department lawsuit an...

    Goodman's men's magazines and paperback books were still successful — the comics, except in the early Golden Age, were a relatively small part of the business — and Goodman considered shutting the division down. The details of his decision not to do so are murky. Artist Jack Kirby — who after his amicable split with creative partner Joe Simon a few years earlier and after losing a lawsuit to a DC Comics editor was having difficulty finding sufficient work — recalled that in late 1958,

    I came in

    Information from Atlas Tales and other references. Some titles may be arguably Timely at the earlier end, or Marvel at the later end. Note: In titles numbered from or into the various All Winners Comics, additional clarifying information is supplied.

    Crime

    All-True Crime #26-52 (Feb. 1948 - Sept. 1952; early issues Timely; continued from Timely Comics' Official True Crime)

    Amazing Detective Cases #3-14 (Nov. 1950 - Sept. 1952; continued from n.a.)

    Caught #1-5 (Aug. 1956 - April 1957)

    Crime Can't

    ↑ Young Men at AtlasTales.com. Retrieved 2010-12-26

    ↑ Young Men #25 (Feb. 1954) at the ]. Retrieved 2010-12-26.

    ↑ Wright, Bradford W. (2001). Comic Book Nation: The Transformation of Youth Culture in America. The ] Press. p. 57. ISBN 978-0-8018-6514-5.

    ↑ Marvel Boy (Marvel, 1950 series) at the ]

    ↑ Astonishing (Marvel, 1951 series) at the Grand Comics Database

    ↑ Marvel: Atlas (Brand) at the Grand Comics Database

    Nevins, Jess. "A Guide to Marvel's Pre-FF #1 Heroes". Archived from the original on August 17, 2011. http://www.webcitation.org/6113tGS7P.

    Vassallo, Michael J. (2005). "A Timely Talk with Allen Bellman". Comicartville.com. p. 2. Archived from the original on November 25, 2009. http://www.comicartville.com/bellman.htm..

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