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      • Major Austronesian languages include Cebuano, Tagalog, Ilocano, Hiligaynon, Bicol, Waray-Waray, Kapampangan, and Pangasinan of the Philippines; Malay, Javanese, Sundanese, Madurese, Minangkabau, the Batak languages, Acehnese, Balinese, and Buginese of western Indonesia; and Malagasy of Madagascar.
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  2. Austronesian languages | Origin, History, Language Map ...

    www.britannica.com/topic/Austronesian-languages

    Major languages. Major Austronesian languages include Cebuano, Tagalog, Ilocano, Hiligaynon, Bicol, Waray-Waray, Kapampangan, and Pangasinan of the Philippines; Malay, Javanese, Sundanese, Madurese, Minangkabau, the Batak languages, Acehnese, Balinese, and Buginese of western Indonesia; and Malagasy of Madagascar.

  3. Tagalog language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tagalog_language

    Tagalog (/ təˈɡɑːlɒɡ /; tə-GAH-log) (Tagalog pronunciation: [tɐˈɡaːloɡ]) is an Austronesian language spoken as a first language by the ethnic Tagalog people, who make up a quarter of the population of the Philippines, and as a second language by the majority.

  4. Austronesian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austronesian_languages

    Major Austronesian languages include Malay (Indonesian and Malaysian), Javanese, and Tagalog (Filipino). According to some estimates, the family contains 1,257 languages, which is the second most of any language family.

  5. Philippine languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippine_languages

    The Philippine languages are a proposed group by R. David Paul Zorc and Robert Blust that include all the languages of the Philippines and northern Sulawesi—except Sama–Bajaw and a few languages of Palawan—form a subfamily of Austronesian languages. Although the Philippines is near the center of Austronesian expansion from Formosa, there is little linguistic diversity among the approximately 150 Philippine languages, suggesting that earlier diversity has been erased by the spread of ...

  6. Who says that Filipinos are an Austronesian race? - Quora

    www.quora.com/Who-says-that-Filipinos-are-an...

    “Austronesian” is not a race, but a family of languages. The languages spoken in the Philippines (other than English and Spanish) are all related and belong to the Philippine family, a subfamily of the Austronesian family.

  7. In Focus: The Austronesian Expansion- a Reaction to "Paths of ...

    ncca.gov.ph/about-culture-and-arts/in-focus/the...

    Jun 14, 2011 · Back to article list. June 14, 2011. JESUS T. PERALTA, Ph.D. There are two major hypotheses defining the Neolithic Age Austronesian movement: the “out of Taiwan or South China” theory by the language-oriented Peter Bellwood; and ‘Island Origin” theory by the Southeast Asian specialist, the archaeologist, Wilhelm Solheim; and another by Stephen Oppenheimer.

  8. List of major and official Austronesian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_major_and_official...

    This is a list of major and official Austronesian languages, a language family originating from Taiwan, that is widely dispersed throughout the islands of Southeast Asia and the Pacific, with a few members spoken on continental Asia and Madagascar

    Language
    Speakers
    Native name
    Official status
    5,000,000
    Bahsa Acèh/بهسا اچيه/Bahsa Cam/بهسا تشام
    Vietnam Indonesia
    639,210
    Na Vosa Vakaviti
    Tagalog (Filipino)
    20,000,000 (L1) 80,000,000 (L2)
    Wikang Filipino/Tagalog
    171,855
    many variants
  9. What Languages Are Spoken in the Philippines? - WorldAtlas

    www.worldatlas.com/articles/what-language-do...
    • Official Languages Spoken in The Philippines
    • National Language of The Philippines
    • Regional Languages of The Philippines
    • Foreign Languages Spoken in The Philippines

    During colonial rule, the official language of the islands was Spanish. Even after the territory was ceded to the US at the end of the 19th century, Spanish remained the lingua franca for another century or so. In 1901, under US occupation, English became the language of the public school system. The Constitution of 1935 established both English and Spanish as the official languages of the country with a note that Congress should nominate a native language with national standing. The Congress...

    In addition to being one of the official languages of the country, Filipino is also the national language. This language primarily consists of Tagalog with some mix of other Philippine languages. Public school teachers rely on Filipino to teach most classes, and it is the language of choice for televised media and cinema. Today, it has become the lingua franca throughout the majority of the country as well as in Philippine communities around the world.

    Twenty-one languages are spoken regionally. These include: Aklanon, Basian, Bikol, Cebuano, Chavacano, Hiligaynon, Ibanag, Ilocano, Ilonggo, Ivatan, Maranao, Tagalog, Kapampangan, Kinaray-a, Waray, Maguindanao, Pangasinan, Sambal, Surigaonon, Tausug, and Yakan.Each of these represents a major indigenous language of Philippines that is spoken in areas inhabited by large populations of native speakers. The majority of these regional languages belong to the Malayo-Polynesian language family sub-...

    Not all of the languages spoken in the Philippines are indigenous. This country is home to a large number of immigrants as well, which is reflected in its wide variety of foreign languages. These languages include Chinese (various types), Arabic, Japanese, Spanish, Malay, Tamil, and Korean. Many regional languages here have borrowed loanwords from several of these languages, particularly for food and household items. Of these foreign languages of Philippines, the Constitution requires that th...

    • Amber Pariona
  10. Languages of the Philippines - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_the_Philippines

    There are some 120 to 187 languages spoken in the Philippines, depending on the method of classification. Almost all are Malayo-Polynesian languages native to the archipelago. A number of Spanish-influenced creole varieties generally called Chavacano are also spoken in certain communities.

  11. Austronesian

    languagesgulper.com/eng/Austronesian.html

    Javanese, Sundanese, Malay and Tagalog are the largest Austronesian languages.