Yahoo Web Search

    • Azithromycin - Wikipedia
      • From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Not to be confused with Erythromycin. Azithromycin is an antibiotic used for the treatment of a number of bacterial infections. This includes middle ear infections, strep throat, pneumonia, traveler's diarrhea, and certain other intestinal infections.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azithromycin#:~:text=From%20Wikipedia%2C%20the%20free%20encyclopedia%20Not%20to%20be,pneumonia%2C%20traveler%27s%20diarrhea%2C%20and%20certain%20other%20intestinal%20infections.
  1. People also ask

    What antibiotic is similar to azithromycin?

    What is the best way to take azithromycin?

    What is the drug class for azithromycin?

    How long is azithromycin effective?

  2. Azithromycin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azithromycin

    4 days ago · Azithromycin is an antibiotic used for the treatment of a number of bacterial infections. This includes middle ear infections, strep throat, pneumonia, traveler's diarrhea, and certain other intestinal infections. It can also be used for a number of sexually transmitted infections, including chlamydia and gonorrhea infections.

    • C₃₈H₇₂N₂O₁₂
    • Zithromax, Azithrocin, others
    • AU: B1, US: B (No risk in non-human studies)
    • Liver
  3. Erythromycin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erythromycin

    4 days ago · Erythromycin is an antibiotic used for the treatment of a number of bacterial infections. This includes respiratory tract infections, skin infections, chlamydia infections, pelvic inflammatory disease, and syphilis.

    • C₃₇H₆₇NO₁₃
    • AU: A, US: B (No risk in non-human studies)
    • liver (under 5% excreted unchanged)
    • Eryc, Erythrocin, others
  4. Macrolide - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macrolide

    Oct 13, 2020 · Azithromycin has been used to treat strep throat (Group A streptococcal (GAS) infection caused by Streptococcus pyogenes) in penicillin-sensitive patients, however macrolide-resistant strains of GAS are not uncommon. Cephalosporin is another option for these patients. [citation needed] Side-effects

  5. Mycoplasma genitalium - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mycoplasma_genitalium

    3 days ago · Resistance to multiple antibiotics is occurring, including azithromycin which until recently was the most reliable treatment. The bacteria was first isolated from urogenital tract of humans in 1981, [7] and was eventually identified as a new species of Mycoplasma in 1983. [1]

  6. Roxithromycin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roxithromycin

    4 days ago · Roxithromycin is a semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotic. It is used to treat respiratory tract, urinary and soft tissue infections. Roxithromycin is derived from erythromycin, containing the same 14-membered lactone ring. However, an N-oxime side chain is attached to the lactone ring.

    • C₄₁H₇₆N₂O₁₅
    • AU: B1
    • Liver, peak concentration averaging 2 hours after ingestion.
    • Rulide, Biaxsig, others
  7. How to pronounce azithromycin | HowToPronounce.com

    www.howtopronounce.com/azithromycin

    Oct 07, 2020 · How to say azithromycin in English? Pronunciation of azithromycin with 5 audio pronunciations, 1 meaning, 8 translations and more for azithromycin.

  8. Gonorrhea - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gonorrhea

    4 days ago · Antibiotics are used to treat gonorrhea infections. As of 2016, both ceftriaxone by injection and azithromycin by mouth are most effective. However, due to increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, local susceptibility patterns must be taken into account when deciding on treatment.

  9. Azithromycin: MedlinePlus Drug Information

    medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a697037.html
    • Medical uses
    • Administration
    • Preparation
    • Treatment
    • Uses
    • Diet
    • Side effects
    • Risks
    • Prevention
    • Diagnosis

    Azithromycin is used to treat certain bacterial infections, such as bronchitis; pneumonia; sexually transmitted diseases (STD); and infections of the ears, lungs, sinuses, skin, throat, and reproductive organs. Azithromycin also is used to treat or prevent disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection [a type of lung infection that often affects people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)]. Azithromycin is in a class of medications called macrolide antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria.

    Azithromycin comes as a tablet, an extended-release (long-acting) suspension (liquid), and a suspension (liquid) to take by mouth. The tablets and suspension (Zithromax) are usually taken with or without food once a day for 15 days. When used for the prevention of disseminated MAC infection, azithromycin tablets are usually taken with or without food once weekly. The extended-release suspension (Zmax) is usually taken on an empty stomach (at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal) as a one-time dose. To help you remember to take azithromycin, take it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take azithromycin exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor. Shake the liquid well before each use to mix the medication evenly. Use a dosing spoon, oral syringe, or measuring cup to measure the correct amount of medication. Rinse the measuring device with water after taking the full dose of medication.

    If you receive azithromycin powder for suspension (Zithromax) in the single-dose, 1-gram packet, you must first mix it with water before you take the medication. Mix the contents of the 1-gram packet with 1/4 cup (60 mL) of water in a glass and consume the entire contents immediately. Add an additional 1/4 cup (60 mL) of water to the same glass, mix, and consume the entire contents to ensure that you receive the entire dose.

    If you vomit within an hour after taking azithromycin, call your doctor right away. Your doctor will tell you if you need to take another dose. Do not take another dose unless your doctor tells you to do so. You should begin to feel better during the first few days of treatment with azithromycin. If your symptoms do not improve, or get worse, call your doctor. Take azithromycin until you finish the prescription, even if you feel better. Do not stop taking azithromycin unless you experience the severe side effects described in the SIDE EFFECTS section. If you stop taking azithromycin too soon or skip doses, your infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics.

    Azithromycin is also used sometimes to treat H. pylori infection, travelers' diarrhea, and other gastrointestinal infections; Legionnaires' disease (a type of lung infection); pertussis (whooping cough; a serious infection that can cause severe coughing); and babesiosis (an infectious disease carried by ticks). It is also used to prevent heart infection in people having dental or other procedures, and to prevent STD in victims of sexual assault. Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this medication for your condition. This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

    Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet. Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

    Azithromycin may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

    If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

    Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store azithromycin tablets, suspension, and extended-release suspension at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Do not refrigerate or freeze the extended-release suspension. Discard any azithromycin suspension that is left over after 10 days or no longer needed. Discard any unused extended-release azithromycin suspension after dosing is complete or 12 hours after preparation. Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program. It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

    Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your body's response to azithromycin.

  10. 阿奇霉素 - 维基百科,自由的百科全书

    zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/阿奇霉素

    Oct 01, 2020 · 阿奇霉素(Azithromycin, / ə ˌ z ɪ θ r oʊ ˈ m aɪ s ᵻ n / )是一种屬於大环内酯的抗生素,於1980年被發現,1981年推出。 又翻译作阿红霉素、阿齐红霉素。

  11. Clarithromycin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarithromycin

    4 days ago · Clarithromycin, sold under the brand name Biaxinamong others, is an antibioticused to treat various bacterialinfections. This includes strep throat, pneumonia, skin infections, H. pyloriinfection, and Lyme disease, among others. Clarithromycin can be taken by mouth as a pill or liquid.