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  1. Barbara Fritchie (née Hauer) (December 3, 1766 – December 18, 1862), also known as Barbara Frietchie, and sometimes spelled Frietschie, was a Unionist during the Civil War. She became part of American folklore in part from a popular poem by John Greenleaf Whittier .

    Barbara Fritchie - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Fritchie
  2. Ever its torn folds rose and fell. On the loyal winds that loved it well; And through the hill-gaps sunset light. Shone over it with a warm good-night. Barbara Frietchie’s work is o’er, And the Rebel rides on his raids no more. Honor to her! and let a tear. Fall, for her sake, on Stonewall’s bier.

  3. Barbara Fritchie (née Hauer) (December 3, 1766 – December 18, 1862), also known as Barbara Frietchie, and sometimes spelled Frietschie, was a Unionist during the Civil War. She became part of American folklore in part from a popular poem by John Greenleaf Whittier .

  4. THE POEM. An American poet and editor, John Greenleaf Whittie r penned the ballad of Barbara Fritchie in 1863 after hearing about the alleged exploit from a friend of his. He used a German variant of her name in the poem, spelling it Frietchie. Such was the enduring fame of the poem that when British Prime Minister Winston Churchill visited the ...

  5. HISTORY. Barbara Fritchie (1766–1862) is a central figure in the history of Frederick, Maryland. A Unionist during the Civil War, she is best known for her folkloric defiance in the face of Confederate troops. As the occupying rebel forces were marching out of Frederick in September 1862, Dame Fritchie, then 95, was said to have waved a Union ...

  6. Barbara Frietchie's work is o'er, And the Rebel rides on his raids no more. Honor to her! and let a tear Fall, for her sake, on Stonewall's bier. Over Barbara Frietchie's grave, Flag of Freedom and Union, wave! Peace and order and beauty draw Round thy symbol of light and law; And ever the stars above look down On thy stars below in Frederick town!

    • Introduction and Text of "Barbara Frietchie"
    • Commentary
    • Questions & Answers

    John Greenleaf Whittier's "Barbara Frietchie," a twenty couplet narrative poem, is based on a legend that made its rounds during and after the American Civil War. Differing accounts exist regarding the facts of Mrs. Frietchie's action. About the genesis of the poem, Whittier has explained that he did not create the story; he had read it in reports from newspapers that he considered trustworthy sources. He also says that the story had been widely spread throughout Maryland and Washington, D.C., long before he penned his poem about it.

    Whittier's speaker of "Barbara Frietchie" offers a tribute to the patriotism of an elderly woman. First Movement: A Beautiful September Morning Up from the meadows rich with corn, Clear in the cool September morn, The clustered spires of Frederick stand Green-walled by the hills of Maryland. Round about them orchards sweep, Apple- and peach-tree fruited deep, Fair as a garden of the Lord To the eyes of the famished rebel horde, On that pleasant morn of the early fall When Lee marched over the mountain wall,— Over the mountains winding down, Horse and foot, into Frederick town. Forty flags with their silver stars, Forty flags with their crimson bars, Flapped in the morning wind: the sun Of noon looked down, and saw not one. The speaker describes a beautiful cool September morning with "meadows rich with corn" surrounding the "clustered spires of Frederick," a Maryland town that would soon be invaded by troops of the rebel army of General Robert E. Lee, led by General Stonewall Jackso...

    Question:What did Barbara Frietchie do that led Whittier to write this poem? Answer:About the genesis of the poem, Whittier has explained that he did not create the story; he had read it in reports from newspapers that he considered trustworthy sources. He also says that the story had been widely spread throughout Maryland and Washington, D.C., long before he penned his poem about it. Any story about a ninety-year-old woman's patriotism and efforts to save a flag is bound to be the stuff of legends, as this one clearly is. Question:In lines 12 through 16 of John Greenleaf Whittier's "Barbara Frietchie," what did the men do to the flags that morning? Answer:The "flags" described in those lines are the battle flags. The men didn't do anything to them; those battle flags just "flapped in the wind." Question:Were the soldiers engaged in a battle with Frederick town in John Greenleaf Whittier's "Barbara Frietchie"? Answer:Not exactly -- they were there to get food and supplies, as the li...

    • Linda Sue Grimes
  7. Jan 03, 2003 · Barbara Frietchie Poem by John Greenleaf Whittier. Read John Greenleaf Whittier poem:Up from the meadows rich with corn, Clear in the cool September morn.

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