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  1. Ostsiedlung - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Colonisation

    Yet there are only few records of Germans from the 1170s; a large influx of settlers occurred in Eastern Mecklenburg from 1210 on behalf of Duke Heinrich Borwin, in Pomerania after 1220 on behalf of the dukes Wartislaw III (Pomerania-Demmin) and Barnim I (Pomerania-Stettin) as well as the Bishop of Cammin Herrmann von der Gleichen.

  2. Yet there are only few records of Germans from the 1170s; a large influx of settlers occurred in Eastern Mecklenburg from 1210 on behalf of Duke Heinrich Borwin, in Pomerania after 1220 on behalf of the dukes Wartislaw III (Pomerania-Demmin) and Barnim I (Pomerania-Stettin) as well as the Bishop of Cammin Herrmann von der Gleichen.

  3. Rostock - Unionpedia, the concept map

    en.unionpedia.org/i/Rostock

    Barnim VI, Duke of Pomerania. Barnim VI, Duke of Pomerania (– 22 September 1405 in Pütnitz, near Ribnitz-Damgarten) was duke of Pomerania-Wolgast from 1394 to 1405. New!!: Rostock and Barnim VI, Duke of Pomerania · See more » Bartenshagen-Parkentin

  4. Ostsiedlung

    enacademic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/1657540
    • Background
    • Ostsiedlung
    • Assimilation
    • Marches and Regions Affected by Ostsiedlung
    • Drang Nach Osten
    • 20th Century
    • Sources
    • Further Reading

    Central Europe before the onset of Ostsiedlung

    Central Europe underwent dramatic changes after the Migration period of 300 to 700 CE. The Roman Empire had lost its dominant position. The Franks had created an empire that, besides former Roman Gallia, had united the former West Germanic tribes and adopted Christianity. East Francia, an early predecessor of Germany, aimed to be the successor to the Catholic Western Roman Empire, and developed into the Holy Roman Empire. In Scandinavia, the former North Germanic tribes entered the Viking Age...

    Eastern Marches of the Frankish and Holy Roman Empires

    The Slavs living within the reach of the Frankish Empire (later the Holy Roman Empire) were collectively called Wends, also Elbe Slavs. They seldom formed larger political entities, but rather constituted various small tribes, dwelling as far west as to a line from the Eastern Alps and Bohemia to the Saale and Elbe rivers. As the Frankish Empire expanded, various Wendish tribes were conquered or allied with the Franks, such as the Obodrites, who aided the Franks in defeating the West Germanic...

    Slavic uprising of 983

    In 983, the Polabian Slavs in the March of the Billungs and the Northern March stretching from the Elbe River to the Baltic shore succeeded in a rebellion against the political rule and Christian mission of the Empire. In spite of their new-won independence, the Obodrite, Rani, Liutizian and Hevelli tribes were soon faced with internal struggles and warfare as well as raids from the newly-constituted and expanding Piast (early Polish) state from the East, Denmarkfrom the North and the Empire...

    Though settlement had to a lower degree occurred in the Frankish marches already, massive settlement did not start until the 12th century (e.g. in East Holstein, West Mecklenburg, Central and Southeastern marches), and in the early 13th century (e.g. in Pomerania, Rügen), following the reassertion of Saxon authority over Wendish areas (the Holstein area by Holstein Count Adolf II, Brandenburg by Albert the Bear, Mecklenburg and Pomerania by Henry the Lion) in the 1150s). The activities of the Teutonic Order accelerated settlement along the Baltic coast. During the Ostsiedlung, Germans settled east of the Elbe and Saale rivers, regions largely inhabited by Polabian Slavs. Likewise, in Styria and Carinthia, German communities took form in areas inhabited by Slovenes. The emigration of inhabitants of the Valais valley in Switzerland to areas that had been settled before by the Romanshad to some extent the same preconditions as the colonisation of the East.

    Colonization was the pretext to assimilation processes, that went on for centuries. Assimilation occurred both ways - depending on the region, either the Germans, or the local pre-German population was assimilated.

    Nordalbingen

    The Nordalbingen March, occupying the territory between Hedeby and the Danish fortress of Dannevirke in the north and the Eider River in the south, was part of the Empire during the reign of Charlemagne. The border was later fixed at the Eider River.

    Saxon Eastern March

    While the Franks had already established a Sorbian March east of the Saale river in the 9th century, king Otto I designated a much vaster area the Saxon Eastern March in 937, comprising roughly the territory between the Elbe, Oder and Peene rivers. Ruled by margrave Gero I, it is also referred to as Marca Geronis. Ater Gero's death in 965, the march was divided in smaller districts: Northern March, Lusatian March, Meissen March, and Zeitz March. The march was settled by various West Slavic tr...

    March of the Billungs and the Northern March

    The March of the Billungs was constituted simultaneously with the Saxon Eastern March by king Otto I in 936. It covered the areas south of the Baltic Sea not included in the Eastern March and was put under the rule of Hermann Billung. The area was inhabited by Obodrites in the West, Rani in the Northeast and Polabian Slavstribes in the South east. Due to the great Slavic uprising in 983, both the Billung March and the Northern March were lost for the Empire except for a small area in the West...

    In the 19th century, recognition of this complex phenomenon coupled with the rise of nationalism. In Germany and some Slavic countries, most notably Poland, Ostsiedlung was perceived in nationalist circles as a prelude to contemporary expansionism and Germanisation efforts, the slogan used for this perception was Drang nach Osten.

    Economic reasons led to a westward migration of Germans from eastern Prussia in the late 19th and early 20th century (Ostflucht). The 20th century wars and nationalist policies severely altered the ethnic and cultural composition of Eastern Europe. After World War I, Germans in reconstituted Poland were set under pressure to leave the Polish Corridor and other areas. Before World War II, the Nazis initiated the Nazi-Soviet population transfers, wiping out the old settlement areas of the Baltic Germans, the Germans in Bessarabia and others. During World War II, in line with Nazi Germany's expansion, Generalplan Ost was drawn to expel and enslave the Slavs according to the Nazi's Lebensraum concept. While that was prevented by the war's turn, some measures such as the expulsion of 2 million Poles and settlement of Volksdeutschein the annexed territories were implied. With the Red Army's advance and Nazi Germany's defeat in 1945, the ethnic make-up of Eastern and East Central Europe wa...

    Horst Gründer, Peter Johanek, Kolonialstädte, europäische Enklaven oder Schmelztiegel der Kulturen?: Europäische Enklaven oder Schmelztiegel der Kulturen?, 2001, ISBN 3825836010, 9783825836016
    Paul Reuber, Anke Strüver, Günter Wolkersdorfer, Politische Geographien Europas - Annäherungen an ein umstrittenes Konstrukt: Annäherungen an ein umstrittenes Konstrukt, 2005, ISBN 3825865231, 9783...
    Alain Demurger, Wolfgang Kaiser, Die Ritter des Herrn: Geschichte der Geistlichen Ritterorden, 2003, ISBN 3406502822, 9783406502828
    Herrmann, Die Slawen in Deutschland
    Charles Higounet (1911–1988) "Les allemands en Europe centrale et oriental au moyen age"
    Bielfeldt et al., Die Slawen in Deutschland. Ein Handbuch, Hg. Joachim Herrmann, Akademie-Verlag Berlin, 1985
  5. 1325 - Find link

    www.edwardbetts.com/find_link/1325

    Barnim IV, Duke of Pomerania (116 words) exact match in snippet view article find links to article Barnim IV of Pomerania ( 1325 – 22 August 1365) was a Duke of Pomerania-Wolgast-Rügen. He was the second son of Duke Wartislaw IV of Pomerania-Wolgast and

  6. Euphemia - Find link

    edwardbetts.com/find_link/Euphemia

    Barnim IV, Duke of Pomerania (116 words) exact match in snippet view article find links to article Pomerania 20. Jaromar II, Prince of Rügen 10. Vitslav II, Prince of Rügen 21. Euphemia of Pomerelia-Gdańsk 5. Margaret of Rugia 22. Otto I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg

  7. Ostsiedlung : definition of Ostsiedlung and synonyms of ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/Ostsiedlung/en-en
    • Background
    • Ostsiedlung
    • Assimilation
    • Marches and Regions Affected by Ostsiedlung
    • Drang Nach Osten
    • 20th Century
    • Sources
    • Further Reading

    Central Europe before the onset of Ostsiedlung

    Central Europe underwent dramatic changes after the Migration period of 300 to 700 CE. The Roman Empire had lost its dominant position. The Franks had created an empire that, besides former Roman Gallia, had united the former West Germanic tribes and adopted Christianity. East Francia, an early predecessor of Germany, aimed to be the successor to the Catholic Western Roman Empire, and developed into the Holy Roman Empire. In Scandinavia, the former North Germanic tribes entered the Viking Age...

    Eastern Marches of the Frankish and Holy Roman Empires

    The Slavs living within the reach of the Frankish Empire (later the Holy Roman Empire) were collectively called Wends, also Elbe Slavs. They seldom formed larger political entities, but rather constituted various small tribes, dwelling as far west as to a line from the Eastern Alps and Bohemia to the Saale and Elbe rivers. As the Frankish Empire expanded, various Wendish tribes were conquered or allied with the Franks, such as the Obodrites, who aided the Franks in defeating the West Germanic...

    Slavic uprising of 983

    In 983, the Polabian Slavs in the March of the Billungs and the Northern March stretching from the Elbe River to the Baltic shore succeeded in a rebellion against the political rule and Christian mission of the Empire. In spite of their new-won independence, the Obodrite, Rani, Liutizian and Hevelli tribes were soon faced with internal struggles and warfare as well as raids from the newly-constituted and expanding Piast (early Polish) state from the East, Denmarkfrom the North and the Empire...

    Though settlement had to a lower degree occurred in the Frankish marches already, massive settlement did not start until the 12th century (e.g. in East Holstein, West Mecklenburg, Central and Southeastern marches), and in the early 13th century (e.g. in Pomerania, Rügen), following the reassertion of Saxon authority over Wendish areas (the Holstein area by Holstein Count Adolf II, Brandenburg by Albert the Bear, Mecklenburg and Pomerania by Henry the Lion) in the 1150s). The activities of the Teutonic Orderaccelerated settlement along the Baltic coast. During the Ostsiedlung, Germans settled east of the Elbe and Saale rivers, regions largely inhabited by Polabian Slavs. Likewise, in Styria and Carinthia, German communities took form in areas inhabited by Slovenes. The emigration of inhabitants of the Valais valley in Switzerland to areas that had been settled before by the Romanshad to some extent the same preconditions as the colonisation of the East.

    Colonization was the pretext to assimilation processes, that went on for centuries. Assimilation occurred both ways - depending on the region, either the Germans, or the local pre-German population was assimilated.

    Nordalbingen

    The Nordalbingen March, occupying the territory between Hedeby and the Danish fortress of Dannevirke in the north and the Eider River in the south, was part of the Empire during the reign of Charlemagne. The border was later fixed at the Eider River.

    Saxon Eastern March

    While the Franks had already established a Sorbian March east of the Saale river in the 9th century, king Otto I designated a much vaster area the Saxon Eastern March in 937, comprising roughly the territory between the Elbe, Oder and Peene rivers. Ruled by margrave Gero I, it is also referred to as Marca Geronis. Ater Gero's death in 965, the march was divided in smaller districts: Northern March, Lusatian March, Meissen March, and Zeitz March. The march was settled by various West Slavic tr...

    March of the Billungs and the Northern March

    The March of the Billungs was constituted simultaneously with the Saxon Eastern March by king Otto I in 936. It covered the areas south of the Baltic Sea not included in the Eastern March and was put under the rule of Hermann Billung. The area was inhabited by Obodrites in the West, Rani in the Northeast and Polabian Slavstribes in the South east. Due to the great Slavic uprising in 983, both the Billung March and the Northern March were lost for the Empire except for a small area in the West...

    In the 19th century, recognition of this complex phenomenon coupled with the rise of nationalism. In Germany and some Slavic countries, most notably Poland, Ostsiedlung was perceived in nationalist circles as a prelude to contemporary expansionism and Germanisation efforts, the slogan used for this perception was Drang nach Osten.

    Economic reasons led to a westward migration of Germans from eastern Prussia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries (Ostflucht). The 20th century wars and nationalist policies severely altered the ethnic and cultural composition of Central and Eastern Europe. After World War I, Germans in reconstituted Poland were set under pressure to leave the Polish Corridor and other areas. Before World War II, the Nazis initiated the Nazi-Soviet population transfers, wiping out the old settlement areas of the Baltic Germans, the Germans in Bessarabia and others. During World War II, in line with Nazi Germany's expansion, Generalplan Ost was drawn to expel and enslave the Slavs according to the Nazi's Lebensraum concept. While that was prevented by the war's turn, some measures such as the expulsion of 2 million Poles and settlement of Volksdeutschein the annexed territories were implied. With the Red Army's advance and Nazi Germany's defeat in 1945, the ethnic make-up of Central and Eastern...

    Horst Gründer, Peter Johanek, Kolonialstädte, europäische Enklaven oder Schmelztiegel der Kulturen?: Europäische Enklaven oder Schmelztiegel der Kulturen?, 2001, ISBN 3-8258-3601-0, ISBN 978-3-8258...
    Paul Reuber, Anke Strüver, Günter Wolkersdorfer, Politische Geographien Europas - Annäherungen an ein umstrittenes Konstrukt: Annäherungen an ein umstrittenes Konstrukt, 2005, ISBN 3-8258-6523-1, I...
    Alain Demurger, Wolfgang Kaiser, Die Ritter des Herrn: Geschichte der Geistlichen Ritterorden, 2003, ISBN 3-406-50282-2, ISBN 978-3-406-50282-8
    Herrmann, Die Slawen in Deutschland
    Charles Higounet (1911–1988) "Les allemands en Europe centrale et oriental au moyen age"
    Bielfeldt et al., Die Slawen in Deutschland. Ein Handbuch, Hg. Joachim Herrmann, Akademie-Verlag Berlin, 1985
  8. Elbe - Unionpedia, the concept map

    en.unionpedia.org/i/Elbe

    Bogislaw II, Duke of Pomerania. Bogislaw II (– 23 January 1220) was Duke of Pomerania-Stettin from 1187 until his death. New!!: Elbe and Bogislaw II, Duke of Pomerania · See more » Bohemia. Bohemia (Čechy;; Czechy; Bohême; Bohemia; Boemia) is the westernmost and largest historical region of the Czech lands in the present-day Czech ...

  9. Concentration Camps List

    www.tartanplace.com/tartanhistory/concentration...

    Malines-Terneuzen Railway. 1,207 survived (148) V: Vergeltungswaffe: Supersonic Rocket Jet Engine Flyer carrying 2,000 lb bomb designed by Wehrner von Braun, later director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center’s Saturn V. Dr Kenneth Hartman recalls 3,709 VI & V2s dropped on Antwerp. 4,239+ dead, 6,362+ wounded Oct 7, 1944-Mar 30,1945 (125).

  10. Thomas D Werle, age 52, Florissant, MO 63031 View Full Report Known Locations: Florissant MO 63031, Saint Louis MO 63144 Possible Relatives: Deborah J Taylor, Douglas V Werle, Mary Ann Werle