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  1. House of Griffin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greifen_dynasty

    Name of the Dynasty. The dynasty is known by two names, Pomerania, after their primary fief, and Griffin, after their coat of arms, which had featured a griffin since the late 12th century: The first verifiable use of the griffin as the dynasty's heraldic emblem occurred in a seal of Casimir II, Duke of Pomerania, which showed the imaginary beast within a shield, and was attached to a document ...

  2. Sophie of Pomerania - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophia_of_Pomerania

    Barnim VI, Duke of Pomerania (1365–1405) 8. Wartislaw IX, Duke of Pomerania (1400–1457) 17. Veronica of Hohenzollern: 4. Eric II, Duke of Pomerania (1418/25–1474) 18. Eric IV, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg (1354–1411) 9. Sophia of Saxe-Lauenburg (1395–1462) 19. Sophia of Brunswick-Lüneburg (1358–1416) 2. Bogislaw X, Duke of Pomerania ...

    • 1523–1533
    • 13 May 1568, Kiel
  3. Elizabeth of Poland - The popular Duchess of Pomerania ...

    www.historyofroyalwomen.com/poland/elizabeth-of...

    The western side, know as Pomerania-Stettin, was ruled by their cousin, Barnim III. The Duchy of Pomerania was located on the Baltic coast in present-day Poland and East Germany. Elizabeth and Bogislaw had three children; a daughter Elizabeth, born between 1345 and 1347, a son Casimir, born around 1351, and an unnamed daughter who probably died ...

  4. House of Griffins | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/House_of_Griffins

    The House of Griffins or House of Pomerania (German: Greifen; Polish: Gryfici), also known as House of Greifen,[4] was a dynasty of dukes ruling the Duchy of Pomerania from the 12th century until 1637. The name "Griffins" was used by the dynasty after the 15th century[5] and had been taken from the ducal coat of arms. Wartislaw I (around 1091 – died August 9, 1135) was the first historical ...

  5. House of Mecklenburg - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Mecklenburg-Strelitz

    Lord Henry II of Mecklenburg's maternal grandmother, a lady named Marianna, was the first wife of Duke Barnim I of Pomerania (d. 1278), Lord of Wolgast, as well as sister of King Eric XI of Sweden. Marianna had given birth to an only surviving child, a daughter named Anastasia of Pomerania, who then became the wife of Henry I of Mecklenburg (d ...

  6. Bar to Barometric Light - GluedIdeas.com

    gluedideas.com/Encyclopedia-Britannica-Volume-3...

    Barnim I. (c. 1209-1278), Called The Good, Was The Son Of Bogislaus Ii., Duke Of Pomerania-stettin, And Succeeded To This Duchy On His Father's Death In 1220. In 1250 He Was Compelled To Recognize The Supreracy Of The Margrave Of Brandenburg.

  7. Name of the Dynasty - db0nus869y26v.cloudfront.net

    db0nus869y26v.cloudfront.net/en/House_of_Pomerania

    The dynasty is known by two names, Pomerania, after their primary fief, and Griffin, after their coat of arms, which had featured a griffin since the late 12th century: The first verifiable use of the griffin as the dynasty's heraldic emblem occurred in a seal of Casimir II, Duke of Pomerania, which showed the imaginary beast within a shield ...

  8. GENEALOGÍA CASA REAL ESPAÑOLA: 15 tatarabuelos III

    reinasdeespala.blogspot.com/2015/12/15...

    Dec 15, 2015 · Duke Wartislaw IX of Pomerania-Wolgast (c. 1400 – 17 April 1457, Wolgast) was the eldest son of the Duke Barnim VI, Duke of Pomerania and Veronica. Europaische Stammtafaln does not cite an origin for Veronica.

  9. Sophie de Pomerania - Wikipedia

    ro.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophie_de_Pomerania

    Sophie de Pomerania (germană Sophia von Pommern; 1498–1568) a fost regină consort a Danemarcei și Norvegiei ca soție a regelui Frederic I al Danemarcei.Este cunoscută pentru că a condus independent fief-urile sale Lolland și Falster, castelele din Kiel și Plön și câteva sate din Holsten în timpul domniei ca regină sau ca văduvă.

  10. Ostsiedlung - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deutsche_Ostsiedlung

    Ostsiedlung (German pronunciation: [ˈɔstˌziːdlʊŋ], literally east settling), in English called the German eastward expansion, was the medieval eastward migration and settlement of Germanic-speaking peoples from the Holy Roman Empire, especially its southern and western portions, into less-populated regions of Central Europe, parts of west Eastern Europe, and the Baltics.