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      • Battle of Guam (1944) The Second Battle of Guam (July 21 — August 10, 1944) was the capture of Guam by the United States from Japanese control. Guam was a U.S. territory (in the Mariana Islands ). The battle was during the Pacific campaign of World War II .
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  2. Second Battle of Guam - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Guam_(1944)

    The Second Battle of Guam (21 July – 10 August 1944) was the American recapture of the Japanese-held island of Guam, a U.S. territory in the Mariana Islands captured by the Japanese from the U.S. in the 1941 First Battle of Guam during the Pacific campaign of World War II .

    • Allied victory
  3. Battle of Guam (1944) - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Guam_(1944)

    From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Second Battle of Guam (July 21 — August 10, 1944) was the capture of Guam by the United States from Japanese control. Guam was a U.S. territory (in the Mariana Islands). The battle was during the Pacific campaign of World War II.

  4. Guam (1944) order of battle - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guam_(1944)_order_of_battle

    Main article: Battle of Guam (1944) On 21 July 1944, United States Marine and Army forces landed on the west coast of the island of Guam, the southernmost of the Mariana Islands. The island, a U.S. territory prior to World War II, had been captured by forces of the Empire of Japan 8–10 December 1941. The invasion of Guam was part of Operation Forager, an effort to recapture the entire Marianas chain from Japan.

    • Background
    • Battle
    • Aftermath
    • Medal of Honor Recipients
    • See Also
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    Guam, at 212 square miles (543 square kilo­me­ters), is the largest is­land of the Mar­i­anas, with a length of 32 miles (52 km) and a width rang­ing from 12 miles (19.31 km) to 4 miles (6.44 km) at dif­fer­ent points of the island.: It had been a United States pos­ses­sion since its cap­ture from Spain in 1898 until it was cap­tured by the Japan­ese on 10 De­cem­ber 1941, fol­low­ing the at­tack on Pearl Har­bor. It was not as heav­ily for­ti­fied as the other Mar­i­ana Is­lands such as Saipan that had been Japan­ese pos­ses­sions since the end of World War I, but by 1944, Guam had a large Japan­ese gar­ri­son. The Al­lied plan for the in­va­sion of the Mar­i­anas, Op­er­a­tion For­ager, called for heavy pre­lim­i­nary bom­bard­ment, first by car­rier air­craft and planes based in the Mar­shall Is­lands to the east, then once air su­pe­ri­or­ity was gained, close bom­bard­ment by battleships.:22 Saipan, Tin­ian, and Guam were cho­sen as tar­gets due to their size, their suit­abil­i...

    Guam, ringed by reefs, cliffs, and heavy surf, pre­sents a for­mi­da­ble chal­lenge for an attacker.:14 Un­der­wa­ter de­mo­li­tion teams re­con­noi­tered the beaches and re­moved ob­sta­cles from 14–17 July.:43 De­spite the ob­sta­cles, on 21 July, the Amer­i­can forces landed on both sides of the Orote Penin­sula on the west­ern side of Guam, plan­ning to se­cure Apra Harbor.:23 The 3rd Ma­rine Di­vi­sion landed near Agana to the north of Orote at 08:29, and the 1st Pro­vi­sional Ma­rine Brigade landed near Agat to the south.:24,44 Japan­ese ar­tillery sank 20 U.S. LVTsand in­flicted heavy ca­su­al­ties on the land­ing troops, es­pe­cially of the 1st Pro­vi­sional Ma­rine Brigade, but by 09:00 men and tanks were ashore at both beaches. By night­fall, the U.S. Marines and sol­diers had es­tab­lished beach­heads about 6,600 feet (2,000 m) deep.Japan­ese coun­ter­at­tacks were made through­out the first few days of the bat­tle, mostly at night, using in­fil­tra­tion tac­tics. Sev­era...

    A few Japan­ese sol­diers held out in the jun­gle after the fight­ing on Guam.:87 On 8 De­cem­ber 1945, three U.S. Marines were am­bushed and killed. On 24 Jan­u­ary 1972, Japan­ese Army Sergeant Shoichi Yokoi was dis­cov­ered by hunters on the is­land. He had lived alone in a cave for 28 years, near Talo­fofo Falls. Guam was turned into a base for Al­lied op­er­a­tions after the bat­tle. Five large air­fields were built by the Navy Seabees, and Army Air Forces B-29 bombers flew from North­west Field and North Field on Guam to at­tack tar­gets in the West­ern Pa­cific and on main­land Japan.:87–88 Lib­er­a­tion Daycon­tin­ues to be cel­e­brated on Guam every July 21.

    Four Medal of Honorre­cip­i­ents of the Bat­tle of Guam: 1. Captain (later General) Louis H. Wilson, Jr., USMC 2. Private First Class Leonard F. Mason, USMC (posthumous) 3. Private First Class Luther Skaggs Jr., USMC 4. Private First Class Frank Witek, USMC (posthumous)

    Agana race riot – Violent confrontation between white U.S. Marines and black U.S. sailors
    Anderson, Charles R. Western Pacific. U.S. Army Campaigns of World War II. United States Army Center of Military History. CMH Pub 72-29.
    Gailey, Harry (1988). The Liberation of Guam 21 July – 10 August. Novato, California, U.S.A.: Presidio Press. ISBN 0-89141-651-X.
    Guam: Operations of the 77th Division. American Forces in Action series. United States Army Center of Military History. 1990 [1946]. CMH Pub 100-5.
    Hatashin, Omi (2009). Private Yokoi's War and Life on Guam, 1944–72: The Story of the Japanese Imperial Army's Longest WWII Survivor in the Field and Later Life. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Pres...
    Battle for the Mariana Islands on YouTube
    Lodge, Major O.R. USMC Historical Monograph: The Recapture of Guam, Historical Branch, United States Marine Corps, 1954.
    O'Brien, Cyril J. Liberation: Marines in the Recapture of Guam, Marines in World War II Commemorative Series, Marine Corps Historical Center, United States Marine Corps, 1994.
  5. Talk:Battle of Guam (1944) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Battle_of_Guam_(1944)

    A map (full view) showing the progression of the Second Battle of Guam (July 21 – August 10, 1944), in which the United States recaptured the Japanese-held island of Guam.

  6. File:Map of the Battle of Guam, 1944.svg - Simple English ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Map_of_the_Battle...

    Map of the Battle of Guam, 1944, during the Pacific Campaign. Date: 21 March 2012, 21:32 (UTC) Source: This file was derived from: Battle of Guam map.jpg: Author: Battle_of_Guam_map.jpg: Us Military; derivative work: Grandiose

  7. Battle of Guam (1944) | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Guam_(1944)
    • Background
    • Battle
    • See Also
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    Guam is the largest of the Marianas, 30 miles (48 km) long and 9 miles (14 km) wide. It had been a United States possession since its capture from Spain in 1898 until it was captured by the Japanese on December 10, 1941, following the Attack on Pearl Harbor. It was not as heavily fortified as the other Mariana Islands such as Saipan that had been Japanese possessions since the end of World War I, but by 1944 it had a large Japanese garrison. The Allied plan for the invasion of the Marianas called for heavy preliminary bombardment, first by carrier aircraft and planes based in the Marshall Islands to the east, then once air superiority was gained, close bombardment by battleships. Guam was chosen as a target because its large size made it suitable as a base for supporting the next stage of operations towards the Philippines, Taiwan and the Ryukyu Islands; the deep-water harbor at Apra was suitable for the largest ships; and the two airfields would be suitable for B-29 Superfortressbo...

    Guam, ringed by reefs, cliffs, and heavy surf, presents a formidable challenge for an attacker. But despite the obstacles, on July 21, the Americans landed on both sides of the Orote peninsula on the western side of Guam, planning to cut off the airfield. The 3rd Marine Division landed near Agana to the north of Orote at 08:28, and the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade landed near Agat to the south. Japanese artillery sank 20 LVTs, and inflicted heavy casualties on the Americans, especially on the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade, but by 09:00 men and tanks were ashore at both beaches. The 77th Infantry Divisionhad a more difficult landing. Lacking amphibious vehicles, they had to wade ashore from the edge of the reef where they were dropped by their landing craft. The men stationed in the two beachheads were pinned down by vicious Japanese fire, making initial progress inland quite slow. By nightfall the Americans had established beachheads about 2,000 meters deep. Japanese counter-atta...

    Agana race riot – Violent confrontation between white U.S. Marines and black U.S. sailors.
    Anderson, Charles R.. Western Pacific. U.S. Army Campaigns of World War II. United States Army Center of Military History. CMH Pub 72-29. http://www.history.army.mil/brochures/westpac/westpac.htm.
    Gailey, Harry (1988). The Liberation of Guam 21 July - 10 August. Novato, California, U.S.A.: Presidio Press. ISBN 0-89141-651-X.
    Guam: Operations of the 77th Division. American Forces in Action series. United States Army Center of Military History. 1990 [1946]. CMH Pub 100-5. http://www.history.army.mil/books/wwii/guam/guam7...
    Hatashin, Omi (2009). Private Yokoi's War and Life on Guam, 1944-72: The Story of the Japanese Imperial Army's Longest Wwii Survivor in the Field and Later Life. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Pres...
    Lodge, Major O.R. USMC Historical Monograph: The Recapture of Guam, Historical Branch, United States Marine Corps, 1954.
    O'Brien, Cyril J. Liberation: Marines in the Recapture of Guam, Marines in World War II Commemorative Series, Marine Corps Historical Center, United States Marine Corps, 1994.
    Dyer, George Carroll (1956). "The Amphibians Came to Conquer: The Story of Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner". United States Government Printing Office. Archived from the original on 21 May 2011. http:...
  8. Category:Battle of Guam - Wikimedia Commons

    commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Battle_of_Guam

    Dec 30, 2019 · Category:Battle of Guam From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository Note that this category is for images of the 1944 battle for Guam won by the United States, not the 1941 engagement won by the Japanese.

    • 10 August 1944
    • Guam
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