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  1. Stanislaus of Szczepanów - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanislaus_of_Cracow

    Stanislaus of Szczepanów, or Stanisław Szczepanowski, (July 26, 1030 – April 11, 1079) was a Bishop of Kraków known chiefly for having been martyred by the Polish king Bolesław II the Generous. Stanislaus is venerated in the Roman Catholic Church as Saint Stanislaus the Martyr (as distinct from the 16th-century Jesuit Stanislaus Kostka ).

  2. Bolesław II the Generous, Duke of Poland, was excommunicated in 1080 after murdering the bishop Saint Stanislaus of Kraków. Philip I of France , king of France, for repudiating his marriage and remarrying, by Hugh, Archbishop of Lyon and later reaffirmed by Pope Urban II .

  3. Šubić family - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Subic

    Katarina Šubić (?–1358), married Duke of Legnica-Brzeg Bolesław III the Generous in 1326. Jelena Šubić (1306–1378), married to Vladislaus of Bosnia , regent of medieval Bosnia . Pavao II Šubić of Bribir (?–1346), Count of Trogir and Ostrovica , married Elizabeth Frankopan (Elizabeta Krčka)

  4. Judith of Habsburg - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judith_of_Habsburg

    Margareta (21 February 1296 – 8 April 1322), married to Bolesław III the Generous, Duke of Wrocław. Judith (born and died 21 May 1297). Of the ten children only four lived to adulthood. Family legacy. Wenceslaus III and then Anna and Elisabeth succeeded their father as rulers of Bohemia.

  5. 1100s (decade) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1100s_(decade)

    The 1100s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1100, and ended on December 31, 1109.

  6. List of mythological objects - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mythological_objects

    Grus, the historical sword of Bolesław III Wrymouth, medieval prince of Poland. Morgelai , the king makes Beves a knight and presents him with a sword called Morgelai. Guy of Warwick's Sword , belonged to the legendary Guy of Warwick who is said to have lived in the 10th century.

  7. Rome's excommunications | Reformed Theology at Semper Reformanda

    www.semperreformanda.com/.../romes-excommunications
    • 1st Century
    • 2nd Century
    • 3rd Century
    • 4th Century
    • 5th Century
    • 6th Century
    • 8th Century
    • 9th Century
    • 10th Century
    • 11th Century
    Simon Magus, for whom simonywas named
    An unnamed Corinthianwho had married a woman who had been his father’s wife
    Hymenaeus and Alexander, excommunicated by Paul as recounted in 1 Timothy
    Valentinus, proponent of Gnosticism
    Marcion of Sinope, originator of Marcionism
    Theodotus of Byzantium, proponent of Adoptionism, excommunicated by Pope Victor I
    Sabellius, originator of Sabellianism
    Novatian, an early antipope who taught Novatianism
    Arius, founder of Arianism
    Celestius, Early ArianLeader
    Roman Emperor Theodosius I was excommunicated by the bishop of Milan, Saint Ambrose, for the Massacre of Thessaloniki.After repentance, penance and restitution, the Emperor was restored to communio...
    Nestorius, proponent of Nestorianism
    Eutyches, proponent of Monophysitism
    Dioscorus I of Alexandria, who presided over the robber council of Ephesus
    St Columba was excommunicated in 562 by the synod of Teltownfor allegedly praying for the winning side in an Irish War. The excommunication was later held to be an abuse of justice and the bishops...
    The sons of Conall mac Domnaill by St Columba some time in the late 6th century, due to their persecution of churches
    Theodore of Mopsuestia by the Second Council of Constantinople
    The heretic preachers Adalbert and Clement by a council headed by St Bonifacein 745. Adelbert’s excommunication was not upheld by Rome, however, although Clement’s was.
    The second council of Nicaea excommunicated a number of people by name who had lived in previous times, some of whom had been already condemned previously, including: Arius and all who follow him,...

    The fourth Council of Constantinople excommunicated by name and upheld a number of previous excommunications of previous councils of a number of people who had died in previous centuries. Those nam...

    In 998, Robert II of France, who had been insisting on his right to appoint bishops, was ultimately forced to back down, and ultimately also to put aside his wife Bertha of Burgundy who had also be...

    Michael Cerularius, Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, in 1054. The legal validity of this excommunication has been questioned as it was issued by legates of Pope Leo IXafter the Pope’s death....
    Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor by Pope Gregory VII over the Investiture Controversy.
    Harold II, King of England, for perhaps politically motivated reasons by Pope Alexander II in order to justify the invasion and takeover of the kingdom by William the Conquerorin 1066.
    Bolesław II the Generous, Duke of Poland, was excommunicated in 1080 after murdering the bishop Saint Stanislaus of Kraków.
  8. Bolesław II the Generous, Duke of Poland, was excommunicated in 1080 after murdering the bishop Saint Stanislaus of Kraków. Philip I of France , king of France, for repudiating his marriage and remarrying, by Hugh, Archbishop of Lyon and later reaffirmed by Pope Urban II .

  9. Görlitz - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhorjelc

    From 1815 until 1918, Görlitz belonged to the Province of Silesia in the Kingdom of Prussia, and later to the Province of Lower Silesia in the Free State of Prussia. It is the largest town of the former Province of Lower Silesia that lies west of the Oder-Neisse line and hence formed part of East Germany after World War II.

  10. smyrsite – smyrsite

    smyrsite.wordpress.com/author/smyrsite

    There were a few banknotes – 1, 5, 50 and 100 zł in notes+ 10, 3 gr and 1, 2, 5 zł coins(1 zł was trial). Again, the uprising failed, and all the money of rebels was banned, but wasn’t taken out of circulation until 1838.

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