Yahoo Web Search

  1. About 60 search results
  1. www.wikipedia.org › wiki › en:Cyrillic_alphabetCyrillic script - Wikipedia

    The Cyrillic script (/ s ɪ ˈ r ɪ l ɪ k / sə-RIL-ik) is a writing system used for various languages across Eurasia and is used as the national script in various Slavic, Turkic, Mongolic, Uralic, Caucasian and Iranic-speaking countries in Southeastern Europe, Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, Central Asia, North Asia and East Asia.

  2. Nov 21, 2021 · The Phoenician alphabet is also called the Early Linear script (in a Semitic context, not connected to Minoan writing systems), because it is an early development of the pictographic Proto- or Old Canaanite script, into a linear, alphabetic script, also marking the transfer from a multi-directional writing system, where a variety of writing ...

  3. People also ask

    What kind of script do they use in Cambodia?

    Where was the Khmer script written in Thailand?

    When do you use subscripts in Khmer script?

    When was the Brahmic script used in the Philippines?

  4. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Khmer_scriptKhmer script - Wikipedia

    Nov 21, 2021 · The Khmer script (Khmer: អក្សរខ្មែរ, Âksâr Khmêr, pronounced [ʔaksɑː kʰmae]) is an abugida (alphasyllabary) script used to write the Khmer language, the official language of Cambodia. It is also used to write Pali in the Buddhist liturgy of Cambodia and Thailand. Khmer is written from left to right.

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Development_of_the_firstHistory of writing - Wikipedia

    • Inventions of Writing
    • Writing Systems
    • Recorded History
    • Developmental Stages
    • Locations and Timeframes
    • Writing Materials
    • See Also

    Writing was long thought to have been invented in a single civilization, a theory named "monogenesis". Scholars believed that all writing originated in ancient Sumer (in Mesopotamia) and spread over the world from there via a process of cultural diffusion.According to this theory, the concept of representing language by written marks, though not necessarily the specifics of how such a system worked, was passed on by traders or merchants traveling between geographical regions. However, the discovery of the scripts of ancient Mesoamerica, far away from Middle Eastern sources, proved that writing had been invented more than once. Scholars now recognize that writing may have independently developed in at least four ancient civilizations: Mesopotamia (between 3400 and 3100 BCE), Egypt (around 3250 BCE), China (1200 BCE),and lowland areas of Southern Mexico and Guatemala (by 500 BCE). Regarding ancient Egypt, several scholars have argued that "the earliest solid evidence of Egyptian writi...

    Symbolic communication systems are distinguished from writing systems. With writing systems, one must usually understand something of the associated spoken language to comprehend the text. In contrast, symbolic systems, such as information signs, painting, maps, and mathematics, often do not require prior knowledge of a spoken language. Every human community possesses language, a feature regarded by many as an innate and defining condition of humanity (see Origin of language). However the development of writing systems, and their partial supplantation of traditional oralsystems of communication, have been sporadic, uneven, and slow. Once established, writing systems on the whole change more slowly than their spoken counterparts and often preserve features and expressions that no longer exist in the spoken language. There are considered to be three writing criteria for all writing systems. The first being that writing must be complete. It must have a purpose or some sort of meaning t...

    The origins of writing appear during the start of the pottery-phase of the Neolithic, when clay tokens were used to record specific amounts of livestock or commodities. These tokens were initially impressed on the surface of round clay envelopes and then stored in them. The tokens were then progressively replaced by flat tablets, on which signs were recorded with a stylus. Actual writing is first recorded in Uruk, at the end of the 4th millennium BC, and soon after in various parts of the Near-East. An ancient Mesopotamianpoem gives the first known story of the invention of writing: Scholars make a reasonable distinction between prehistory and history of early writing but have disagreed concerning when prehistory becomes history and when proto-writing became "true writing." The definition is largely subjective. Writing, in its most general terms, is a method of recording information and is composed of graphemes, which may, in turn, be composed of glyphs. The emergence of writing in...

    A conventional "proto-writing to true writing" system follows a general series of developmental stages: 1. Picture writing system: glyphs (simplified pictures) directly represent objects and concepts. In connection with this, the following substages may be distinguished: 1.1. Mnemonic: glyphs primarily as a reminder. 1.2. Pictographic: glyphs directly represent an object or a concept such as (A) chronological, (B) notices, (C) communications, (D) totems, titles, and names, (E) religious, (F) customs, (G) historical, and (H) biographical. 1.3. Ideographic: graphemes are abstract symbols that directly represent an idea or concept. 2. Transitional system: graphemes refer not only to the object or idea that it represents but to its name as well. 3. Phonetic system: graphemes refer to sounds or spoken symbols, and the form of the grapheme is not related to its meanings. This resolves itself into the following substages: 3.1. Verbal: grapheme (logogram) represents a whole word. 3.2. Sylla...

    Proto-writing

    The first writing systems of the Early Bronze Age were not a sudden invention. Rather, they were a development based on earlier traditions of symbol systems that cannot be classified as proper writing, but have many of the characteristics of writing. These systems may be described as "proto-writing." They used ideographic or early mnemonic symbols to convey information, but it probably directly contained no natural language.These systems emerged in the early Neolithic period, as early as the...

    Bronze Age writing

    Writing emerged in many different cultures in the Bronze Age. Examples are the cuneiform writing of the Sumerians, Egyptian hieroglyphs, Cretan hieroglyphs, Chinese logographs, Indus script, and the Olmec script of Mesoamerica. The Chinese script likely developed independently of the Middle Eastern scripts around 1600 BC. The pre-Columbian Mesoamerican writing systems (including Olmec and Maya scripts) are also generally believed to have had independent origins.It is thought that the first tr...

    Iron Age writing

    The Phoenician alphabet is simply the Proto-Canaanite alphabet as it was continued into the Iron Age (conventionally taken from a cut-off date of 1050 BC).[citation needed] This alphabet gave rise to the Aramaic and Greek alphabets. These in turn led to the writing systems used throughout regions ranging from Western Asia to Africa and Europe. For its part the Greek alphabet introduced for the first time explicit symbols for vowel sounds. The Greek and Latin alphabets in the early centuries o...

    There is no very definite statement as to the material which was in most common use for the purposes of writing at the start of the early writing systems. In all ages it has been customary to engrave on stone or metal, or other durable material, with the view of securing the permanency of the record. Metals, such as stamped coins, are mentioned as a material of writing; they include lead,[note 1]brass, and gold. To the engraving of gems there is reference also, such as with seals or signets. The common materials of writing were the tablet and the roll, the former probably having a Chaldean origin, the latter an Egyptian. The tablets of the Chaldeans are among the most remarkable of their remains.[according to whom?] There are small pieces of clay, somewhat rudely shaped into a form resembling a pillow, and thickly inscribed with cuneiform characters.[note 2]Similar use has been seen in hollow cylinders, or prisms of six or eight sides, formed of fine terra cotta, sometimes glazed, o...

    Main

    1. Phonetics, Palaeography, logograms, Brahmi, Devanagari, logographic, Vinča signs, Asemic writing

    General

    1. Alphabet, Palaeography, Inscriptions, Book, Manuscript, Shorthand, Latin alphabet, writing system, Braille, ogham, Indus script, Mixtec, uncials, Zapotec, Aurignacian, Chinese characters (Kanji, Hanja), Ugarit, Katakana, Hiragana, Acheulean, Ethnoarchaeology, Hoabinhian, Gravettian, Oldowan, Uruk, Etruscan, Cretan hieroglyphs, Nabataean, Luwian, Olmec, Busra, Tamil, Kannada, Grakliani Hill

    Other

    1. History of numbers, History of art (Ancient art), Oral literature, History of developmental dyslexia, Protoscholastic writing

  6. In 2015 the Unicode Consortium encoded a lowercase version of the script, since typists would often set Cherokee with two different point sizes, so as to mark beginnings of sentences and given names (as in the Latin alphabet). Handwritten Cherokee also shows a difference in lower- and uppercase letters, such as descenders and ascenders.

    • 1820s – present
    • Syllabary
  7. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › BaybayinBaybayin - Wikipedia

    Nov 21, 2021 · Baybayin ( Tagalog pronunciation: [baɪbaˈjɪn], pre-kudlit: ᜊᜊᜌᜒ, virama-krus-kudlit: ᜊᜌ᜔ᜊᜌᜒᜈ᜔, virama-pamudpod: ᜊᜌ᜴ᜊᜌᜒᜈ᜴; also incorrectly known as alibata) is a Philippine script. The script is an alphasyllabary belonging to the family of the Brahmic scripts. It was widely used in Luzon and other ...

  1. People also search for