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  1. Fleur-de-lis - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fleur-de-lis

    The fleur-de-lis was also the symbol of the House of Kotromanić, a ruling house in medieval Bosnia allegedly in recognition of the Capetian House of Anjou, where the flower is thought of as a Lilium bosniacum. Today, fleur-de-lis is a national symbol of Bosniaks. Other countries include Spain in recognition of rulers from the House of Bourbon.

  2. France - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/France_(country)

    France is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other major urban areas include Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Lille and Nice. France, including its overseas territories, has the most time zones of any country, with a total of twelve.

  3. Blanche of Castile - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blanche_de_Castile

    Blanche of Castile (Spanish: Blanca de Castilla; 4 March 1188 – 27 November 1252) was Queen consort of France by marriage to Louis VIII.She acted as regent twice during the reign of her son, Louis IX: during his minority from 1226 until 1234, and during his absence from 1248 until 1252.

    • 14 July 1223 – November 1226
    • 27 November 1252 (aged 64), Paris, France
  4. Italy - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italia

    Italy is located in Southern Europe, and is also considered part of Western Europe. A unitary parliamentary republic with Rome as its capital, the country covers a total area of 301,340 km 2 (116,350 sq mi) and shares land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia, and the enclaved microstates of Vatican City and San Marino.

  5. Salerno - Unionpedia, the concept map

    en.unionpedia.org/Salerno

    Capetian House of Anjou The Capetian House of Anjou was a royal house and cadet branch of the direct French House of Capet, part of the Capetian dynasty. New!!:

    • Usages
    • Origin
    • Royal Symbol
    • Elsewhere
    • Symbolism in Religion and Art
    • Architecture
    • Modern Usage
    • in Fiction
    • See Also

    France

    While the fleur-de-lis has appeared on countless European coats of arms and flags over the centuries, it is particularly associated with the French monarchy in a historical context and continues to appear in the arms of the King of Spain (from the French House of Bourbon), the Grand Duke of Luxembourg, and members of the House of Bourbon. It remains an enduring symbol of France which appears on French postage stamps, although it has never been adopted officially by any of the French republics...

    Outside France

    In Italy, the fleur de lis, called giglio bottonato (it), is mainly known from the crest of the city of Florence. In the Florentine fleurs-de-lis,[f] the stamens are always posed between the petals. Originally argent (silver or white) on gules (red) background, the emblem became the standard of the imperial party in Florence (parte ghibellina), causing the town government, which maintained a staunch Guelph stance, being strongly opposed to the imperial pretensions on city states, to reverse t...

    Organisations

    Fleurs-de-lis appear on military insignia and the logos of many organisations. During the 20th century the symbol was adopted by various Scouting organisations worldwide for their badges. Architects and designers use it alone and as a repeated motif in a wide range of contexts, from ironwork to bookbinding, especially where a French context is implied.[citation needed]

    The fleur de lis is widely thought to be a stylized version of the species Iris pseudacorus, or Iris florentina. However, the lily (genus lilium, family Liliaceae) and the iris (family Iridaceae) are two different plants, phylogenetically and taxonomically unrelated. Lily (in Italian: giglio) is the name usually associated with the stylized flower in the Florentine heraldic devices. Decorative ornaments that resemble the fleur-de-lis have appeared in artwork from the earliest human civilizations.[citation needed] According to Pierre-Augustin Boissier de Sauvages, an 18th-century French naturalist and lexicographer: The heraldist François Velde is known to have expressed the same opinion: Sauvages' hypothesis seems to be supported by the archaic English spelling fleur-de-luce and by the Luts's variant name Lits.[citation needed]

    Frankish to the French monarchy

    The graphic evolution of crita to fleur-de-lis was accompanied by textual allegory. By the late 13th century, an allegorical poem by Guillaume de Nangis (d. 1300), written at Joyenval Abbey in Chambourcy, relates how the golden lilies on an azure ground were miraculously substituted for the crescents on Clovis' shield, a projection into the past of contemporary images of heraldry. Through this propagandist connection to Clovis, the fleur-de-lis has been taken in retrospect to symbolize all th...

    France Modern

    France Modern remained the French royal standard, and with a white background was the French national flag until the French Revolution, when it was replaced by the tricolor of modern-day France. The fleur-de-lis was restored to the French flag in 1814, but replaced once again after the revolution against Charles X of France in 1830.[d] In a very strange turn of events after the end of the Second French Empire, where a flag apparently influenced the course of history, Henri, comte de Chambord,...

    Other European monarchs and rulers

    Fleurs-de-lis feature prominently in the Crown Jewels of England and Scotland. In English heraldry, they are used in many different ways, and can be the cadency mark of the sixth son. Additionally, it features in a large number of royal arms of the House of Plantagenet, from the 13th century onwards to the early Tudors (Elizabeth of York and the de la Pole family).[citation needed] The tressure flory–counterflory (flowered border) has been a prominent part of the design of the Scottish royal...

    Fleurs-de-lis crossed the Atlantic along with Europeans going to the New World, especially with French settlers. Their presence on North American flags and coats of arms usually recalls the involvement of French settlers in the history of the town or region concerned, and in some cases the persisting presence there of a population descended from such settlers. The fleur-de-lis appears on the Canadian coat of arms, the flag of Quebec as well as the flags of the cities of Montreal, Sherbrooke and Trois-Rivières. It is also featured on the personal flag used by the Queen of Canada. There are many French-speaking people in other Canadian provinces for whom the fleur-de-lis remains a symbol of their cultural identity. Franco-Ontarians, for example, feature the fleur-de-lis prominently on their flag. In Saskatchewan the Western Red Lilyappears on the provincial flag and is sometimes used as a symbol of the province. Some representations resemble a fleur de lis but the traditional version...

    In the Middle Ages, the symbols of lily and fleur-de-lis overlapped considerably in Christian religious art. The historian Michel Pastoureau says that until about 1300 they were found in depictions of Jesus, but gradually they took on Marian symbolism and were associated with the Song of Solomon's "lily among thorns" (lilium inter spinas), understood as a reference to Mary. Other scripture and religious literature in which the lily symbolizes purity and chastity also helped establish the flower as an iconographic attribute of the Virgin. It was also believed that the fleur-de-lis represented the Holy Trinity. In medieval England, from the mid-12th century, a noblewoman's seal often showed the lady with a fleur-de-lis, drawing on the Marian connotations of "female virtue and spirituality". Images of Mary holding the flower first appeared in the 11th century on coins issued by cathedrals dedicated to her, and next on the seals of cathedral chapters, starting with Notre Dame de Paris i...

    In building and architecture, the fleur-de-lis is often placed on top of iron fence posts, as a pointed defence against intruders. It may ornament any tip, point or post with a decorative flourish, for instance, on finials, the arms of a cross, or the point of a gable. The fleur-de-lis can be incorporated in friezes or cornices, although the distinctions between fleur-de-lis, fleuron, and other stylized flowers are not always clear, or can be used as a motif in an all-over tiled pattern, perhaps on a floor. It may appear in a building for heraldic reasons, as in some English churches where the design paid a compliment to a local lord who used the flower on his coat of arms. Elsewhere the effect seems purely visual, like the crenellations on the 14th-century Muslim Mosque-Madrassa of Sultan Hassan. It can also be seen on the doors of the 16th-century Hindu Padmanabhaswamy Temple.

    Some modern usage of the fleur-de-lis reflects "the continuing presence of heraldry in everyday life", often intentionally, but also when users are not aware that they are "prolonging the life of centuries-old insignia and emblems".

    The symbol has featured in modern fiction on historical and mystical themes, as in the bestselling novel The Da Vinci Code and other books discussing the Priory of Sion. It recurs in French literature, where examples well known in English translation include Fleur-de-Lys de Gondelaurier, a character in The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo, and the mention in Dumas's The Three Musketeers of the old custom of branding a criminal with the sign (fleurdeliser). During the reign of Elizabeth I of England, known as the Elizabethan era, it was a standard name for an iris, a usage which lasted for centuries, but occasionally refers to lilies or other flowers. It also appeared in the novel A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Tooleon a sign composed by the protagonist. A variation on the symbol has also been used in the Star Wars franchise to represent the planet of Naboo. The fleur de lis is also used as the heraldic emblem for the Kingdom of Temeria in Andrzej Sapkowski's fantasy n...

  6. Henry IV of France - Hyperleap

    hyperleap.com/topic/Henry_IV_of_France

    He was the first monarch of France from the House of Bourbon, a cadet branch of the Capetian dynasty. Under the Salic law, the Head of the House of Bourbon, as the senior representative of the senior-surviving branch of the Capetian dynasty, became King of France as Henry IV.

  7. Blanche of Castile : definition of Blanche of Castile and ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/Blanche of Castile/en-en

    Louis IX (Poissy, 25 April 1214 – 25 August 1270, Tunis), King of France as successor to his father. Robert (25 September 1216 – 9 February 1250, killed in battle, Manssurah, Egypt) Philip (20 February 1218–1234). John Tristan (21 July 1219–1232), Count of Anjou and Maine.

  8. Homage (feudal) - Hyperleap

    hyperleap.com/topic/Homage_(feudal)

    Vassal - Lord - Feudalism - Fealty - Henry II of England - Normandy - Knight - English Channel - Feudalism in the Holy Roman Empire - William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke - Philip IV of France - Gascony - Medieval Latin - Middle Ages - Ceremony - Investiture - House of Plantagenet - England - France - Duke of Normandy - Duke of Aquitaine - Counts and dukes of Anjou - House of Capet - Monarch ...

  9. Blanche of Castile (Spanish: Blanca de Castilla; 4 March 1188 – 27 November 1252) was Queen consort of France by marriage to Louis VIII. She acted as regent twice during the reign of her son, Louis IX: during his minority from 1226 until 1234, and during his absence from 1248 until 1252.

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