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  1. Denis Johnson was born on July 1, 1949 in Munich, West Germany. Growing up, he also lived in the Philippines, Japan, and the suburbs of Washington, D.C. His father, Alfred Johnson, worked for the State Department as a liaison between the USIA and the CIA. His mother, the former Vera Louise Childress, was a homemaker.

  2. Archived from the original on 14 April 2016. Retrieved 1 October 2017. 100. ^ "Food and ... Retrieved 25 May 2007. 126. ^ "Deaths related to cocaine ... Washington, D ...

  3. Dec 20, 2018 · The September 11 attacks transformed the first term of President George W. Bush and led to what he has called the Global War on Terrorism. The accuracy of describing it as a "war" and its political motivations and consequences are the topic of strenuous debate. The U.S. government increased military operations, economic measures and political pressure on groups which it accused of being ...

    • Background
    • Execution
    • Executioners
    • Aftermath
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    On 22 March 1917, Nicholas, de­posed as a monarch and ad­dressed by the sen­tries as "Nicholas Ro­manov", was re­united with his fam­ily at the Alexan­der Palace in Tsarskoe Selo. He was placed under house ar­rest with his fam­ily by the Pro­vi­sional Gov­ern­ment, and the fam­ily was sur­rounded by guards and con­fined to their quarters. In Au­gust 1917, Alexan­der Keren­sky's pro­vi­sional gov­ern­ment, after a failed at­tempt to send the Ro­manovs to Britain, which was ruled by Nicholas and Alexan­dra's mu­tual first cousin, King George V, evac­u­ated the Ro­manovs to To­bolsk, Siberia, al­legedly to pro­tect them from the ris­ing tide of rev­o­lu­tion. There they lived in the for­mer gov­er­nor's man­sion in con­sid­er­able com­fort. After the Bol­she­viks came to power in Oc­to­ber 1917, the con­di­tions of their im­pris­on­ment grew stricter. Talk in the gov­ern­ment of putting Nicholas on trial grew more fre­quent. Nicholas was for­bid­den to wear epaulettes, and the sen­trie...

    While the Ro­manovs were hav­ing din­ner on 16 July 1918, Yurovsky en­tered the sit­ting room and in­formed them that kitchen boy Leonid Sed­nev was leav­ing to meet his uncle, Ivan Sed­nev, who had re­turned to the city ask­ing to see him; Ivan had al­ready been shot by the Cheka. The fam­ily was very upset as Leonid was Alexei's only play­mate and he was the fifth mem­ber of the im­pe­r­ial en­tourage to be taken from them, but they were as­sured by Yurovsky that he would be back soon. Alexan­dra did not trust Yurovsky, writ­ing in her final diary entry just hours be­fore her death, "whether it's true & we shall see the boy back again!" Leonid was kept in the Popov House that night.Yurovsky saw no rea­son to kill him and wanted him re­moved be­fore the ex­e­cu­tion took place. Around mid­night on 17 July, Yurovsky or­dered the Ro­manovs' physi­cian, Eu­gene Botkin, to awaken the sleep­ing fam­ily and ask them to put on their clothes, under the pre­text that the fam­ily would be mo...

    Ivan Plot­nikov, his­tory pro­fes­sor at the Mak­sim Gorky Ural State Uni­ver­sity, has es­tab­lished that the ex­e­cu­tion­ers were Yakov Yurovsky, Grig­ory P. Nikulin, Mikhail A. Medvedev (Kuprin), Peter Er­makov, Stepan Vaganov, Alexey G. Ka­banov (for­mer sol­dier in the tsar's Life Guards and Chek­ist as­signed to the attic ma­chine gun), Pavel Medvedev, V. N. Ne­tre­bin, and Y. M. Tselms. Fil­ipp Goloshchyokin, a close as­so­ci­ate of Yakov Sverdlov, being a mil­i­tary com­mis­sar of the Ural­ispolkom in Yeka­ter­in­burg, how­ever did not ac­tu­ally par­tic­i­pate, and two or three guards re­fused to take part. Pyotr Voykov was given the spe­cific task of ar­rang­ing for the dis­posal of their re­mains, ob­tain­ing 570 litres (150 gal) of gaso­line and 180 kilo­grams (400 lbs) of sul­phuric acid, the lat­ter from the Yeka­ter­in­burg phar­macy. He was a wit­ness but later claimed to have taken part in the mur­ders, loot­ing be­long­ings from a dead grand duchess. After the kil...

    Early the next morn­ing, when ru­mors spread in Yeka­ter­in­burg about the dis­posal site, Yurovsky re­moved the bod­ies and hid them else­where (56°56′32″N 60°28′24″E / 56.942222°N 60.473333°E / 56.942222; 60.473333). When the ve­hi­cle car­ry­ing the bod­ies broke down on the way to the next cho­sen site, Yurovsky made new arrange­ments, and buried most of the acid-cov­ered bod­ies in a pit sealed and con­cealed with rub­ble, cov­ered over with rail­road ties and then earth (56°54′41″N 60°29′44″E / 56.9113628°N 60.4954326°E / 56.9113628; 60.4954326) on Koptyaki Road, a cart track (sub­se­quently aban­doned) 19 kilo­me­tres (12 mi) north of Yeka­ter­in­burg. On the af­ter­noon of 19 July, Fil­ipp Goloshchyokin an­nounced at the Opera House on Glavny Prospekt that "Nicholas the bloody" had been shot and his fam­ily taken to an­other place. Sverdlov granted per­mis­sion for the local paper in Yeka­ter­in­burg to pub­lish the "Ex­e­cu­tion of Nicholas, the Bloody Crowned Mur­der...

    Bykov, Pavel Mikhailovich. The Last Days of Tsar Nicholas. New York: International Publishers. 1935.
    Cross, Anthony (2014). In the Lands of the Romanovs: An Annotated Bibliography of First-hand English-language Accounts of the Russian Empire (1613-1917). Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers. 2014....
    Massie, Robert K. (2012). The Romanovs: The Final Chapter. Random House. ISBN 9780307873866.
    McNeal, Shay. The Secret Plot to Save the Tsar: New Truths Behind the Romanov Mystery. HarperCollins, 2003. ISBN 0-06-051755-7, ISBN 978-0-06-051755-7
    Execution Of The Romanov Family on YouTube as seen in the movie The Romanovs: An Imperial Family
  4. Reactions to the September 11 attacks included condemnation from world leaders, other political and religious representatives and the international media, as well as numerous memorials and services all over the world. The attacks were widely condemned by the governments of the world, including those traditionally considered hostile to the United States, such as Cuba, Iran, Libya, and North ...

  5. The WikiProject Cycling was called into existence on 30 May 2005. Since then, this project has assembled Wikipedians who share interest regarding topics related to cycling, and who are ready to create and expand content belonging to this area.

  6. This list of cultural references to the September 11 attacks and to the post-9/11 sociopolitical climate, includes works of art, music, books, poetry, comics, theater, film, and television.

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