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  1. Charles V, called the Wise, was King of France from 1364 to his death in 1380. His reign marked an early high point for France during the Hundred Years' War, with his armies recovering much of the territory held by the English, and successfully reversed the military losses of his predecessors. Charles became regent of France when his father John II was captured by the English at the Battle of Poitiers in 1356. To pay for the defense of the kingdom, Charles raised taxes. As a result, he faced hos

    • Biography

      Charles was born at the Château de Vincennes outside of...

    • King of France

      Charles was crowned King of France in 1364 at the Cathedral...

    • Legacy

      Charles' reputation was of great significance for posterity,...

    • Marriage and issue

      On 8 April 1350 Charles married Joanna of Bourbon, leaving

  2. Charles V ( 21 January 1338 – 16 September 1380 ), called the Wise, was the King of France from 1364 to his death and a member of the House of Valois. He was born in Vincennes, the son of King John II of France and Bona of Luxembourg. After his father was captured by the English at the Battle of Poitiers (1356), Charles acted as the ruler of France.

  3. Charles inherited the Austrian hereditary lands in 1519, as Charles I of Austria, and obtained the election as Holy Roman Emperor against the candidacy of the French King. Since the Imperial election, he was known as Emperor Charles V even outside of Germany and the Habsburg motto A.E.I.O.U. ("Austria Est Imperare Orbi Universo"; "it is Austria ...

  4. Sep 11, 2018 · Charles V (21 January 1338 – 16 September 1380), called the Wise, was the King of France from 1364 to his death and a member of the House of Valois. He was born in Vincennes, the son of King John II of France and Bona of Luxembourg. After his father was captured by the English at the Battle of Poitiers (1356), Charles

  5. The dual monarchy of England and France existed during the latter phase of the Hundred Years' War when Charles VII of France and Henry VI of England disputed the succession to the throne of France. It commenced on 21 October 1422 upon the death of King Charles VI of France, who had signed the Treaty of Troyes which gave the French crown to his son-in-law Henry V of England and Henry's heirs.

  6. Charles VI (3 December 1368 – 21 October 1422), called the Beloved ( French: le Bien-Aimé) and later the Mad ( French: le Fol or le Fou ), was King of France from 1380 until his death in 1422. He is known for his mental illness and psychotic episodes which plagued him throughout his life.

  7. From the 1340s to the 19th century, excluding two brief intervals in the 1360s and the 1420s, the kings and queens of England and Ireland also claimed the throne of France. The claim dates from Edward III, who claimed the French throne in 1340 as the sororal nephew of the last direct Capetian, Charles IV. Edward and his heirs fought the Hundred Years' War to enforce this claim, and were briefly successful in the 1420s under Henry V and Henry VI, but the House of Valois, a cadet branch of the Cap

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