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  1. Symptoms. Most people infected with chikungunya virus will develop some symptoms. Symptoms usually begin 3–7 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito. The most common symptoms are fever and joint pain. Other symptoms may include headache, muscle pain, joint swelling, or rash.

  2. Chikungunya Virus: Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment | Health.com

    www.health.com/condition/infectious-diseases/...

    You might encounter the chikungunya virus while traveling to places like South or Central America. Learn more about chikungunya signs and symptoms, how to prevent chikungunya, and chikungunya ...

  3. Chikungunya Virus Infection Symptoms, Signs, and Causes

    www.medicinenet.com/chikungunya_virus_infection...

    Chikungunya virus infection is a disease that causes symptoms similar to those of dengue fever or Zika virus infection. The virus is most commonly found in Africa, the Indian subcontinent, the Caribbean, and in Southeast Asia. The most characteristic signs and symptoms of Chikungunya virus infection include joint pain (known as arthralgia) and ...

  4. Chikungunya virus | CDC

    www.cdc.gov/chikungunya

    Chikungunya virus is spread to people by the bite of an infected mosquito. The most common symptoms of infection are fever and joint pain. Other symptoms may include headache, muscle pain, joint swelling, or rash. Outbreaks have occurred in countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

  5. How to Recognize Chikungunya Fever Symptoms: 7 Steps

    www.wikihow.health/Recognize-Chikungunya-Fever...

    Mar 18, 2020 · Prevent chikungunya fever by avoiding mosquito bites. Currently, there is no commercial vaccine for chikungunya fever. Therefore, the only way to prevent the virus is to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes, especially when traveling in areas where the disease is prevalent, such as Africa, Asia, and parts of the Indian subcontinent.

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  6. Chikungunya: Symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment

    www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/306828

    May 23, 2017 · The chikungunya virus infects humans through the bite of a mosquito. It causes fever and joint pain. It is rarely fatal, but the symptoms can be severe, long-lasting, and debilitating.

  7. Chikungunya: Transmission, Treatment, and Prevention

    www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/what-is-chikungunya

    Signs of chikungunya usually show up 3 to 7 days after you’re bitten. They typically include fever and joint pain , but you also might have a headache , nausea , or a rash and be very tired.

  8. How to Recognize the Signs and Symptoms of Chikungunya

    www.lalpathlabs.com/blog/symptoms-of-chikungunya

    Dec 10, 2019 · Generally, the signs and symptoms of Chikungunya start to show up within two to seven days after being bitten by an infected mosquito. Symptoms of Chikungunya The signs and symptoms typically start with one or more of the following – chills, fever, vomiting, nausea, headache, joint pain, etc.

  9. Chikungunya fact sheet

    www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/chikungunya
    • Signs and Symptoms
    • Transmission
    • Diagnosis
    • Treatment
    • Prevention and Control
    • Disease Outbreaks
    • More About Disease Vectors
    • Who Response

    Chikungunya is characterized by an abrupt onset of fever frequently accompanied by joint pain. Other common signs and symptoms include muscle pain, headache, nausea, fatigue and rash. The joint pain is often very debilitating, but usually lasts for a few days or may be prolonged to weeks. Hence the virus can cause acute, subacute or chronic disease. Most patients recover fully, but in some cases joint pain may persist for several months, or even years. Occasional cases of eye, neurological and heart complications have been reported, as well as gastrointestinal complaints. Serious complications are not common, but in older people, the disease can contribute to the cause of death. Often symptoms in infected individuals are mild and the infection may go unrecognized, or be misdiagnosed in areas where dengue occurs.

    Chikungunya has been identified in over 60 countries in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas. The virus is transmitted from human to human by the bites of infected female mosquitoes. Most commonly, the mosquitoes involved are Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, two species which can also transmit other mosquito-borne viruses, including dengue. These mosquitoes can be found biting throughout daylight hours, though there may be peaks of activity in the early morning and late afternoon. Both species are found biting outdoors, but Ae. aegyptiwill also readily feed indoors. After the bite of an infected mosquito, onset of illness occurs usually between 4 and 8 days but can range from 2 to 12 days.

    Several methods can be used for diagnosis. Serological tests, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), may confirm the presence of IgM and IgG anti-chikungunya antibodies. IgM antibody levels are highest 3 to 5 weeks after the onset of illness and persist for about 2 months. Samples collected during the first week after the onset of symptoms should be tested by both serological and virological methods (RT-PCR). The virus may be isolated from the blood during the first few days of infection. Various reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) methods are available but are of variable sensitivity. Some are suited to clinical diagnosis. RT–PCR products from clinical samples may also be used for genotyping of the virus, allowing comparisons with virus samples from various geographical sources.

    There is no specific antiviral drug treatment for chikungunya. Treatment is directed primarily at relieving the symptoms, including the joint pain using anti-pyretics, optimal analgesics and fluids. There is no commercial chikungunya vaccine.

    The proximity of mosquito vector breeding sites to human habitation is a significant risk factor for chikungunya as well as for other diseases that these species transmit. Prevention and control relies heavily on reducing the number of natural and artificial water-filled container habitats that support breeding of the mosquitoes. This requires mobilization of affected communities. During outbreaks, insecticides may be sprayed to kill flying mosquitoes, applied to surfaces in and around containers where the mosquitoes land, and used to treat water in containers to kill the immature larvae. For protection during outbreaks of chikungunya, clothing which minimizes skin exposure to the day-biting vectors is advised. Repellents can be applied to exposed skin or to clothing in strict accordance with product label instructions. Repellents should contain DEET (N, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide), IR3535 (3-[N-acetyl-N-butyl]-aminopropionic acid ethyl ester) or icaridin (1-piperidinecarboxylic ac...

    Chikungunya occurs in Africa, Asia and the Indian subcontinent. Human infections in Africa have been at relatively low levels for a number of years, but in 1999–2000 there was a large outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and in 2007 there was an outbreak in Gabon. Starting in February 2005, a major outbreak of chikungunya occurred in islands of the Indian Ocean. A large number of imported cases in Europe were associated with this outbreak, mostly in 2006 when the Indian Ocean epidemic was at its peak. A large outbreak of chikungunya in India occurred in 2006 and 2007. Several other countries in South-East Asia were also affected. Since 2005, India, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar and Thailand have reported over 1.9 million cases. In 2007 transmission was reported for the first time in Europe, in a localized outbreak in north-eastern Italy. There were 197 cases recorded during this outbreak and it confirmed that mosquito-borne outbreaks by Ae. Albopictusare plausible in Eur...

    Both Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus have been implicated in large outbreaks of chikungunya. Whereas Ae. aegypti is confined within the tropics and sub-tropics, Ae. albopictus also occurs in temperate and even cold temperate regions. In recent decades Ae. albopictushas spread from Asia to become established in areas of Africa, Europe and the Americas. The species Ae. albopictus thrives in a wider range of water-filled breeding sites than Ae. aegypti, including coconut husks, cocoa pods, bamboo stumps, tree holes and rock pools, in addition to artificial containers such as vehicle tyres and saucers beneath plant pots. This diversity of habitats explains the abundance of Ae. albopictusin rural as well as peri-urban areas and shady city parks. Ae. aegypti is more closely associated with human habitation and uses indoor breeding sites, including flower vases, water storage vessels and concrete water tanks in bathrooms, as well as the same artificial outdoor habitats as Ae. albopictus. In...

    WHO responds to chikungunya by: 1. formulating evidence-based outbreak management plans; 2. providing technical support and guidance to countries for the effective management of cases and outbreaks; 3. supporting countries to improve their reporting systems; 4. providing training on clinical management, diagnosis and vector control at the regional level with some of its collaborating centres; and 5. publishing guidelines and handbooks on case management and vector control for Member States. WHO encourages countries to develop and maintain the capacity to detect and confirm cases, manage patients and implement social communication strategies to reduce the presence of the mosquito vectors. WHO Media centre Telephone: +41 22 791 2222 E-mail: mediainquiries@who.int

  10. Chikungunya - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chikungunya

    Chikungunya is an infection caused by the Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Symptoms include fever and joint pains. These typically occur two to twelve days after exposure. Other symptoms may include headache, muscle pain, joint swelling, and a rash.