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  1. Prevention and Control | Cholera | CDC

    www.cdc.gov/cholera/prevention.html

    Sep 08, 2020 · Prevention of cholera is dependent on access to safe water, adequate sanitation, and basic hygiene needs. The following materials cover the basics of cholera and other diarrheal disease prevention. Five Basic Cholera Prevention Steps Infection Control for Cholera in Health Care Settings

  2. Five Basic Cholera Prevention Steps | Cholera | CDC

    www.cdc.gov/cholera/preventionsteps.html
    • Make sure to drink and use safe water to brush your teeth, wash and prepare food, and make ice. It is safe to drink and use bottled water with unbroken seals, and canned or bottled carbonated beverages.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and safe water* Before, during, and after preparing food for yourself or your family. After using the latrine or toilet.
    • Use latrines or bury your poop; do not poop in any body of water. Use latrines or other sanitation systems, like chemical toilets, to dispose of poop.
    • Cook food well (especially seafood), keep it covered, and eat it hot. Peel fruits and vegetables* Be sure to cook shellfish (like crabs and crayfish) until they are very hot all the way through.
  3. WHO | Prevention and control of cholera outbreaks: WHO policy ...

    www.who.int/cholera/technical/prevention/control

    Prevention and control of cholera outbreaks: WHO policy and recommendations Introduction. Cholera is an acute enteric infection caused by the ingestion of bacterium Vibrio cholerae present in faecally contaminated water or food. Primarily linked to insufficient access to safe water and proper sanitation, its impact can be even more dramatic in ...

  4. Cholera Prevention | Cleveland Clinic

    my.clevelandclinic.org/.../16636-cholera/prevention

    Here are some precautions that can reduce your risk of getting cholera if you are in an area where it is widespread: Drink only bottled, boiled, or chemically treated water or carbonated beverages. When using bottled drinks, make sure that the seal has not already been broken. Avoid tap water and ice cubes made from tap water.

  5. Cholera Treatment and Prevention | NIH: National Institute of ...

    www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/cholera...

    Vaccination is an important way to protect vulnerable populations from cholera. Vaccines are usually evaluated in field studies by comparing the incidence of disease (in this case, cholera) in a vaccinated population to an unvaccinated placebo control population.

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  7. Cholera: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention

    www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/cholera-faq

    Cholera Treatment and Prevention Cholera is an infectious disease that causes severe watery diarrhea, which can lead to dehydration and even death if untreated. It is caused by eating food or...

    • Mary Anne Dunkin
    • 1 min
  8. Cholera - World Health Organization

    www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/cholera
    • Symptoms
    • History
    • Vibrio cholerae Strains
    • Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Disease Burden
    • Prevention and Control
    • Surveillance
    • Water and Sanitation Interventions
    • Treatment
    • Hygiene Promotion and Social Mobilisation
    • Oral Cholera Vaccines

    Cholera is an extremely virulent disease that can cause severe acute watery diarrhoea. It takes between 12 hours and 5 days for a person to show symptoms after ingesting contaminated food or water (2). Cholera affects both children and adults and can kill within hours if untreated. Most people infected with V. choleraedo not develop any symptoms, although the bacteria are present in their faeces for 1-10 days after infection and are shed back into the environment, potentially infecting other people. Among people who develop symptoms, the majority have mild or moderate symptoms, while a minority develop acute watery diarrhoea with severe dehydration. This can lead to death if left untreated.

    During the 19th century, cholera spread across the world from its original reservoir in the Ganges delta in India. Six subsequent pandemics killed millions of people across all continents. The current (seventh) pandemic started in South Asia in 1961, and reached Africa in 1971 and the Americas in 1991. Cholera is now endemic in many countries.

    There are many serogroups of V. cholerae, but only two – O1 and O139 – cause outbreaks. V. cholerae O1 has caused all recent outbreaks. V. choleraeO139 – first identified in Bangladesh in 1992 – caused outbreaks in the past, but recently has only been identified in sporadic cases. It has never been identified outside Asia. There is no difference in the illness caused by the two serogroups.

    Cholera can be endemic or epidemic. A cholera-endemic area is an area where confirmed cholera cases were detected during the last 3 years with evidence of local transmission (meaning the cases are not imported from elsewhere). A cholera outbreak/epidemic can occur in both endemic countries and in countries where cholera does not regularly occur. In cholera endemic countries an outbreak can be seasonal or sporadic and represents a greater than expected number of cases. In a country where cholera does not regularly occur, an outbreak is defined by the occurrence of at least 1 confirmed case of cholera with evidence of local transmission in an area where there is not usually cholera. Cholera transmission is closely linked to inadequate access to clean water and sanitation facilities. Typical at-risk areas include peri-urban slums, and camps for internally displaced persons or refugees, where minimum requirements of clean water and sanitation are not been met. The consequences of a huma...

    A multifaceted approach is key to control cholera, and to reduce deaths. A combination of surveillance, water, sanitation and hygiene, social mobilisation, treatment, and oral cholera vaccines are used.

    Cholera surveillance should be part of an integrated disease surveillance system that includes feedback at the local level and information-sharing at the global level. Cholera cases are detected based on clinical suspicion in patients who present with severe acute watery diarrhoea. The suspicion is then confirmed by identifying V. choleraein stool samples from affected patients. Detection can be facilitated using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), where one or more positive samples triggers a cholera alert. The samples are sent to a laboratory for confirmation by culture or PCR. Local capacity to detect (diagnose) and monitor (collect, compile, and analyse data) cholera occurrence, is central to an effective surveillance system and to planning control measures. Countries affected by cholera are encouraged to strengthen disease surveillance and national preparedness to rapidly detect and respond to outbreaks. Under the International Health Regulations, notification of all cases of choler...

    The long-term solution for cholera control lies in economic development and universal access to safe drinking water and adequate sanitation. Actions targeting environmental conditions include the iimplementation of adapted long-term sustainable WASH solutions to ensure use of safe water, basic sanitation and good hygiene practices in cholera hotspots. In addition to cholera, such interventions prevent a wide range of other water-borne illnesses, as well as contributing to achieving goals related to poverty, malnutrition, and education. The WASH solutions for cholera are aligned with those of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG 6).

    Cholera is an easily treatable disease. The majority of people can be treated successfully through prompt administration of oral rehydration solution (ORS). The WHO/UNICEF ORS standard sachet is dissolved in 1 litre (L) of clean water. Adult patients may require up to 6 L of ORS to treat moderate dehydration on the first day. Severely dehydrated patients are at risk of shock and require the rapid administration of intravenous fluids. These patients are also given appropriate antibiotics to diminish the duration of diarrhoea, reduce the volume of rehydration fluids needed, and shorten the amount and duration of V. choleraeexcretion in their stool. Mass administration of antibiotics is not recommended, as it has no proven effect on the spread of cholera may contribute to antimicrobial resistance. Rapid access to treatment is essential during a cholera outbreak. Oral rehydration should be available in communities, in addition to larger treatment centres that can provide intravenous flu...

    Health education campaigns, adapted to local culture and beliefs, should promote the adoption of appropriate hygiene practices such as hand-washing with soap, safe preparation and storage of food and safe disposal of the faeces of children. Funeral practices for individuals who die from cholera must be adapted to prevent infection among attendees. Further, awareness campaigns should be organised during outbreaks, and information should be provided to the community about the potential risks and symptoms of cholera, precautions to take to avoid cholera, when and where to report cases and to seek immediate treatment when symptoms appear. The location of appropriate treatment sites should also be shared. Community engagement is key to long term changes in behaviour and to the control of cholera.

    Currently there are three WHO pre-qualified oral cholera vaccines (OCV): Dukoral®, Shanchol™, and Euvichol-Plus®. All three vaccines require two doses for full protection. Dukoral® is administered with a buffer solution that, for adults, requires 150 ml of clean water. Dukoral can be given to all individuals over the age of 2 years. There must be a minimum of 7 days, and no more than 6 weeks, delay between each dose. Children aged 2 -5 require a third dose. Dukoral® is mainly used for travellers. Two doses of Dukoral® provide protection against cholera for 2 years. Shanchol™ and Euvichol-Plus® are essentially the same vaccine produced by two different manufacturers. They do not require a buffer solution for administration. They are given to all individuals over the age of one year. There must be a minimum of two weeks delay between each dose of these two vaccines. Two doses of Shanchol™ and Euvichol-Plus® provide protection against cholera for three years, while one dose provides sh...

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