Yahoo Web Search

  1. About 70 search results
  1. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Constantine II (Latin: Flavius Claudius Constantinus; February 316 – 340) was Roman emperor from 337 to 340. Son of Constantine the Great and co-emperor alongside his brothers, his attempt to exert his perceived rights of primogeniture led to his death in a failed invasion of Italy in 340.

  2. Tiberius II Constantine (Latin: Tiberius Constantinus; Greek: Τιβέριος Κωνσταντῖνος, Tiberios Kōnstantînos; 520 – 14 August 582) was Eastern Roman emperor from 574 to 582. Tiberius rose to power in 574 when Justin II , prior to a mental breakdown, proclaimed Tiberius Caesar and adopted him as his own son.

  3. Constantin II (Latin: Flavius Claudius Constantinus; 316-340) était Empereur romain de 337 à 340. Fils de Constantin le Grand et co-empereur aux côtés de ses frères, sa tentative d'exercer ses droits perçus de primogéniture conduit à sa mort dans une invasion ratée de Italie en 340.

  4. Constantine II (Latin: Flavius Claudius Constantinus; February 316 – 340) was Roman emperor from 337 to 340. Son of Constantine the Great and co-emperor alongside his brothers, his attempt to exert his perceived rights of primogeniture led to his death in a failed invasion of Italy in 340.

  5. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Constantine II (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος Βʹ, Konstantínos II, pronounced [ˌkonstanˈdinos]; born 2 June 1940) reigned as the last King of Greece, from 6 March 1964 until the abolition of the monarchy on 1 June 1973. Constantine is the only son of King Paul and Queen Frederica of Greece.

  6. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Constantine II (Latin: Flavius Claudius Constantinus; February 316 – 340) was Roman emperor from 337 to 340. Son of Constantine the Great and co-emperor alongside his brothers, his attempt to exert his perceived rights of primogeniture led to his death in a failed invasion of Italy in 340.

    • Life
    • Legend
    • Sources

    In 406, the provinces of Roman Britain revolted. The garrisons had not been paid and had determined to choose their own leader. Their first two choices, Marcus and Gratian, did not meet their expectations and were killed. Fearful of a Germanic invasion and desperate for some sense of security in a world that seemed to be rapidly falling apart, the Roman military in Britain sought greater security in strong and able military leadership and chose as their leader a man named after the famed emperor of the early fourth century, Constantine the Great, who had himself risen to power through a military coup in Britain. Constantine was a common soldier, but one of some ability.Early in 407, they acclaimed him as emperor. Constantine moved quickly. He crossed the Channel at Bononia (Boulogne) and (historians have assumed) took with him all of the mobile troops left in Britain, thus denuding the province of any first line military protection and explaining the disappearance of the legions fro...

    Constantine III is also known as Constantine II of Britain. He is often confused with the Constantine found in Geoffrey of Monmouth's highly popular and imaginative Historia Regum Britanniae, who comes to power following Gracianus Municeps' reign. In Geoffrey's account, the Britons ask Aldroenus[fr], the ruler of Armorica, to be their ruler after the Roman withdrawal, seeking a king who can defend them against the barbarians. Aldroenus refuses, believing the country to have diminished, but sends his brother Constantine to rule instead. Constantine becomes king and has three sons, Constans, Aurelius and Uther, but is stabbed to death by a Pict. Constantine III is of no relation to the Constantine described in Geoffrey's account and he has no link to the legend of King Arthur.[citation needed] Geoffrey's Constantine is the brother of Aldroenus, both of whom were the descendants of Conan Meriadoc. It is Geoffrey's Constantine who, through his son Uther Pendragon, becomes the grandfathe...

    Primary sources

    1. Zosimus, Historia Nova, Books 5 & 6 Historia Nova 2. Orosius, Historiae adversum Paganos, 7.40 3. Geoffrey of Monmouth' Historia Regum Britanniae

    Secondary sources

    1. Bartrum, Peter A Welsh Classical Dictionary Cardiff: National Library of Wales, 1993, ISBN 978-0-907158-73-8 2. Birley, Anthony (2005), The Roman Government in Britain, Oxford: Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-925237-4 3. Bury, J. B., A History of the Later Roman Empire from Arcadius to Irene, Vol. I (1889) London; New York: Macmillan OCLC 22138662 4. Elton, Hugh, Constantine III (407–411 A.D.), D.I.R. 5. Ford, David Nash Early British Kingdoms: Constantine Corneu 6. Gibbon, Edward,...

  1. People also search for