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  1. Christian cross - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Christian_cross

    4 days ago · Images of LDS temples and the Angel Moroni (who is found in statue on most temples) are commonly used to symbolize the faith of members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. In April 2020, under President Russell M. Nelson , the Church formally adopted an image inspired by Thorvaldsen's Christus statue underlain with the Church's ...

  2. Christianity in the United States - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › American_Christian_churches

    3 days ago · The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) is a nontrinitarian restorationist denomination. The church is headquartered in Salt Lake City , and is the largest originating from the Latter Day Saint movement which was founded by Joseph Smith in Upstate New York in 1830.

  3. Book of Abraham - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Book_of_Abraham

    6 days ago · The work was canonized by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in 1880 as part of its Pearl of Great Price. It thus forms a doctrinal foundation for the LDS Church and Mormon fundamentalist denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement. It is not considered a sacred text by the Community of Christ.

  4. Christology - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Christological

    6 days ago · Catholic theologian Karl Rahner sees the purpose of modern Christology as to formulate the Christian belief that "God became man and that God-made-man is the individual Jesus Christ" in a manner that this statement can be understood consistently, without the confusions of past debates and mythologies.

  5. Christian Church - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Christian_Church

    6 days ago · Christian Church is a Protestant ecclesiological term referring to the church invisible comprising all Christians, used since the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. In this understanding, "Christian Church" (or "catholic Church") does not refer to a particular Christian denomination but to the "body" or "group" of believers, both defined in various ways.

  6. Oriental Orthodox Churches - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Oriental_Orthodox_Churches

    May 02, 2021 · The Oriental Orthodox Churches are a group of Eastern Christian churches adhering to Miaphysite Christology, with a total of approximately 60 million members worldwide. The Oriental Orthodox Churches are broadly part of the trinitarian Nicene Christian tradition shared by today’s mainstream churches, and represent one of its oldest branches.

  7. Saint - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Saint

    6 days ago · The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The beliefs within The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) with regard to saints are similar but not quite the same as the Protestant tradition. In the New Testament, saints are all those who have entered into the Christian covenant of baptism.

  8. Tripartite (theology) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Tripartite_(theology)

    3 days ago · Thus, Mark 12:30 is well within the parameters of a tripartite view of man. Early Church. The tripartite view of man was considered an orthodox interpretation in the first three centuries of the church and many of the early church fathers (see Supporters of a Tripartite View chart) taught that man is made up of body, soul, and spirit.

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