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  1. Valdemar II of Denmark - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valdemar_II_of_Denmark

    Danish envoys refused these terms and Denmark declared war. While Valdemar sat in prison, most of the German territories tore themselves away from Denmark. Danish armies were dispatched to hold them in line. The war ended in defeat of the Danish troops under the command of Albert II of Orlamünde at Mölln in 1225.

  2. Eric II of Denmark - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_II_of_Denmark

    Eric II the Memorable (Danish: Erik II Emune; c. 1090 – 18 September 1137) was king of Denmark between 1134 and 1137. Eric was an illegitimate son of Eric I of Denmark, who ruled Denmark from 1095 to 1103. Eric the Memorable rebelled against his uncle Niels of Denmark, and was declared king in 1134. He punished his adversaries severely, and ...

  3. Eric VI of Denmark - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_VI_Menved

    Eric VI Menved (1274 – 13 November 1319) was King of Denmark (1286–1319). A son of Eric V of Denmark and Agnes of Brandenburg , he became king in 1286 at age 12, when his father was murdered on 22 November by unknown assailants.

  4. Christopher II of Denmark - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_II_of_Denmark

    Christopher II (Danish: Christoffer 2.; 29 September 1276 – 2 August 1332) was king of Denmark from 1320 to 1326 and again from 1329 until his death. He was a younger son of Eric V. His name is connected with national disaster, as his rule ended in an almost total dissolution of the Danish state.

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  6. List of Danish monarchs - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danish_king

    Related to the Frisian king Redbad II who in 754 had to flee to "the land of the Danes" where King Harald reigned ("Daniae Regi Heraldi"). Sigfred: 770s–790s; Gudfred: 804–810, mentioned as Danish king in the Treaty of Heiligen 811. Hemming: 810–811/812 The Treaty of Heiligen was signed in 811 between the Danish King Hemming and Charlemagne.

  7. Erik XIV | king of Sweden | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Erik-XIV

    Erik XIV, king of Sweden (1560–68) who expanded the powers of the monarchy and pursued an aggressive foreign policy that led to the Seven Years’ War of the North (1563–70) against Denmark. Succeeding his father, Gustav I Vasa, in 1560, Erik soon obtained passage of the Articles of Arboga (1561),

  8. Canute (I), Danish king of England (1016–35), of Denmark (as Canute II; 1019–35), and of Norway (1028–35), who was a power in the politics of Europe in the 11th century, respected by both emperor and pope. Neither the place nor the date of his birth is known. Canute was the grandson of the Polish

  9. Kingdoms of Northern Europe - Denmark

    historyfiles.co.uk/KingListsEurope/Scandinavia...

    Eric VI: 1320 - 1332: Christopher II: 1326 - 1329: Valdemar III: King in opposition to Christopher II. 1332 - 1340: The ruler of Denmark is unknown. 1340 - 1375: Valdemar IV: 1343: The St George's Day Uprising in Estonia sees a revolt defeated by the Livonian Knights, using a mixture of treachery and battle. Three years later, the Danish king ...

  10. Sweyn Forkbeard - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweyn_Forkbeard

    Sweyn Forkbeard (/ s v ɛ n /; Old Norse: Sveinn Haraldsson tjúguskegg; Danish: Svend Tveskæg; 960 – 3 February 1014) was king of Denmark from 986 to 1014. He was the father of King Harald II of Denmark, King Cnut the Great and Queen Estrid Svendsdatter.

  11. Kings and Queens of Scotland, Part 1

    www.rampantscotland.com/features/monarchs.htm

    King Indulph (also spelt Indulf) was a son of Constantine II. He defeated the Danish King Eric of the Bloody Axe at the Battle of the Bauds on the Muir of Findochty (pronounced Finechty), in present day Banffshire, in 961. Like his father, he abdicated and entered a monastery. Dubh/Duff (962-966) Son of Malcolm I, and father of Kenneth III.