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      • Define Church law. Church law synonyms, Church law pronunciation, Church law translation, English dictionary definition of Church law. n. The body of rules governing the faith and practice of members of a religious denomination, especially a Christian church.
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  2. Any church's or religion's laws, rules, and regulations; more commonly, the written policies that guide the administration and religious ceremonies of the Roman Catholic Church. Since the fourth century, the Roman Catholic Church has been developing regulations that have had some influence on secular (non-church-related) legal procedures. These regulations are called canons and are codified in the Code of Canon Law (in Latin, Codex juris canonici ).

  3. n. The body of rules governing the faith and practice of members of a religious denomination, especially a Christian church. American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

  4. A church is defined as a community founded in a unity of faith, a sacramental fellowship of all members with Christ as Lord, and a unity of government. Many scholars assert that a church cannot exist without authority—i.e., binding rules and organizational structures—and that religion and law are mutually inclusive.

  5. Dec 19, 2022 · : a body of religious law governing the conduct of members of a particular faith especially : the codified church law of the Roman Catholic Church Note: Common law has been influenced by canon law in the areas of marriage and inheritance. Roman Catholic canon law, like the civil law, has been modeled on ancient Roman law.

  6. May 2, 2022 · a distinct legal existence and religious history, a recognized creed and form of worship, established places of worship a regular congregation and regular religious services, and an organization of ordained ministers Most mainstream religions such as Catholicism, Judaism, and common Protestant sects fit easily within the IRS guidelines.

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