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  1. OSHA recognizes that many of its permissible exposure limits (PELs) are outdated and inadequate for ensuring protection of worker health. Most of OSHA's PELs were issued shortly after adoption of the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act in 1970, and have not been updated since that time. Section 6 (a) of the OSH Act granted the Agency the authority to adopt existing Federal standards or national consensus standards as enforceable OSHA standards.

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      Note: This table only includes occupational exposure limits...

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      (i) This standard applies to any operations or sectors for...

  2. The permissible exposure limit ( PEL or OSHA PEL) is a legal limit in the United States for exposure of an employee to a chemical substance or physical agent such as high level noise. Permissible exposure limits are established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Most of OSHA's PELs were issued shortly after adoption of the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act in 1970.

  3. Sep 5, 2021 · The permissible exposure limit (PEL) is a legal limit that describes the maximum amount or concentration of a toxic airborne substance that an employee is allowed to be exposed to during a given period of time. PELs are a type of benchmark used to protect (or limit) workers from harm caused by exposure to toxic substances.

  4. Sep 30, 2021 · PELs are established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and they are based on eight-hour time-weighted averages, so they are permissible exposure limits for a worker to be exposed to a chemical substance or physical agent during a typical eight-hour work shift and standard 40-hour workweek.

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