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  2. HCPs: Learn About Why You Should Test Your Recently Diagnosed mBC Patients For A Mutation. See The Signs & Symptoms Surrounding mBC And This Specific Mutation At The Official Site.

  3. Our Oncologists Use Clinical Trials and Research to Help Detect Breast Cancer Earlier. Committed to Beating Cancer and Saving Lives. Learn More About Cancer Care at KP.

  4. Learn About A Genomic Cancer Test That May Help Personalize Your Cancer Care. Watch The Cancer Patient Journey Videos To Learn More About Genomic Cancer Testing.

  1. Most breast and ovarian cancer is not caused by inherited mutations, so genetic testing will not help most women with a family health history of breast and ovarian cancer. Genetic testing will not identify the cause for some hereditary breast and ovarian cancers, because the genes affected in these cancers are not yet known.

  2. Jun 12, 2021 · Most breast-cancer-related tests fall into one or more of the following categories: Screening tests: Screening tests (such as yearly mammograms) are given routinely to people who appear to be healthy and are not suspected of having breast cancer. Their purpose is to find breast cancer early, before any symptoms can develop and the cancer ...

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    What are the results of the Breast Cancer Index test?

    What kind of test is used to diagnose breast cancer?

    How does genetic testing work for breast cancer?

    What does a positive BRCA test mean for breast cancer?

  4. www.breastcancer.org › symptoms › testingBreast Cancer Index Test

    Jul 27, 2021 · The Breast Cancer Index test returns two results: The BCI Prognostic result estimates how likely the cancer is to come back 5 to 10 years after diagnosis (late recurrence). The result is given as a percentage. So a prognostic result of 2.2% means that you have a 2.2% risk of the cancer coming back 5 to 10 years after diagnosis.

    • Overview
    • Why It's Done
    • Risks
    • How You Prepare
    • What You Can Expect
    • Results

    The BRCA gene test is a blood test that uses DNA analysis to identify harmful changes (mutations) in either one of the two breast cancer susceptibility genes — BRCA1 and BRCA2. People who inherit mutations in these genes are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer and ovarian cancer compared with the general population. The BRCA gene test is offered to those who are likely to have an inherited mutation based on personal or family history of breast cancer or ovarian cancer. The BRCA gene test isn't routinely performed on people at average risk of breast and ovarian cancers. The results of genetic testing aren't always clear. A positive result means you carry a gene mutation that increases your risk of cancer and you can work with your doctor to manage that risk. A negative result may mean that you don't have the mutation or that you might have a gene mutation doctors haven't discovered yet. Your test might also identify a gene variant that doctors aren't certain about. In th...

    The BRCA gene test is a blood test that's done to determine if you have changes (mutations) in your DNA that increase the risk of breast cancer. Mutations in either breast cancer gene — BRCA1 or BRCA2 — significantly increase the risk of: 1. Breast cancer 2. Male breast cancer 3. Ovarian cancer 4. Prostate cancer 5. Pancreatic cancer 6. Melanoma If a gene mutation is detected, you and your doctor can work together to manage your risk.

    There's no medical risk associated with being tested for a BRCA gene mutation other than the slight risks — including lightheadedness, bleeding or bruising — of having your blood drawn. Other consequences surrounding genetic testing include the emotional, financial, medical and social implications of your test results. If you test positive for an inherited genetic mutation, you may face: 1. Feelings of anxiety, anger, sadness or depression 2. Concerns over possible insurance discrimination 3. Strained family relationships over learning of a familial genetic mutation 4. Difficult decisions about preventive measures that have long-term consequences 5. Feelings of inevitability that you'll get cancer On the other hand, if you test negative for a BRCA mutation or your results aren't clear-cut — for example, you have a genetic variation, but one that hasn't been associated with cancer in other people — you may experience: 1. "Survivor guilt" if your family has a known gene mutation that...

    The first step in the BRCA gene testing process is to meet with a genetic counselor. As soon as you consider having any genetic test, meet with a genetic counselor to determine whether it's appropriate for you and to discuss the potential risks, limitations and benefits of undergoing genetic testing. The genetic counselor takes a detailed family and medical history, assesses your risk of developing cancer, discusses risks and benefits of genetic testing, and outlines your options. To prepare for your meeting with a genetic counselor: 1. Gather information about your family's medical history, especially that of close relatives. 2. Document your personal medical history, including collecting records from specialists or results of previous genetic testing, if available. 3. Write down questions for the counselor. 4. Consider having a friend or family member accompany you to help ask questions or take notes. Whether to proceed with genetic testing after you meet with a genetic counselor...

    The BRCA gene test is most often a blood test. A doctor, nurse or medical technician inserts a needle into a vein, usually in your arm, to draw the blood sample needed for testing. The sample is sent to a lab for DNA analysis. In some cases, other sample types are collected for DNA analysis, including saliva. If you have a family history of cancer and are interested in pursuing a saliva DNA test, discuss this with your doctor. He or she can refer you to a genetic counselor who can determine the most appropriate sample type for genetic testing.

    It may take a few weeks before test results are available. You meet with your genetic counselor to learn your test results, discuss their implications and go over your options. Your test results may be positive, negative or uncertain.

  5. The risk of contralateral breast cancer increases with the time since a first breast cancer, reaching 20%–30% at 10 years of follow-up and 40%–50% at 20 years, depending on the gene involved. Ovarian cancer: About 1.2% of women in the general population will develop ovarian cancer sometime during their lives .

  6. Imaging Tests to Find Breast Cancer. Different tests can be used to look for and diagnose breast cancer. If your doctor finds an area of concern on a screening test (a mammogram), or if you have symptoms that could mean breast cancer, you will need more tests to know for sure if it’s cancer. Mammograms. Breast Ultrasound.

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  2. Our Oncologists Use Clinical Trials and Research to Help Detect Breast Cancer Earlier. Committed to Beating Cancer and Saving Lives. Learn More About Cancer Care at KP.

  3. Learn About A Genomic Cancer Test That May Help Personalize Your Cancer Care. Watch The Cancer Patient Journey Videos To Learn More About Genomic Cancer Testing.

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