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  1. Delaware - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delaware

    Delaware (/ ˈ d ɛ l ə w ɛər / DEL-ə-wair) is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Maryland to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and New Jersey and the Atlantic Ocean to its east.

    • Blue Laws

      Blue laws, also known as Sunday laws, are laws designed to...

    • Flag of Delaware

      The flag of Delaware consists of a buff-colored diamond on a...

    • Middletown

      The Delaware Route 1 toll road is east of Middletown, and...

  2. History of Delaware - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Delaware

    Delaware in the Civil War. Slavery had been a divisive issue in Delaware for decades before the American Civil War began. Opposition to slavery in Delaware, imported from Quaker-dominated Pennsylvania, led many slaveowners to free their slaves; half of the state's black population was free by 1810, and more than 90% were free by 1860.

  3. Delaware (/ ˈ d ɛ l ə w ɛər / ) is a state in the United States. It is sometimes called the First State because it was the first colony to accept the new constitution in 1787. Its capital is Dover and its biggest city is Wilmington. It is the second smallest state in the United States. The Dutch first settled Delaware.

    • December 7, 1787 (1st)
    • Dover
  4. Lewes, Delaware - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewes,_Delaware

    Lewes (/ l uː. ə s / LOO-iss) is an incorporated city on the Delaware Bay in eastern Sussex County, Delaware.According to the 2010 census, the population is 2,747. Along with neighboring Rehoboth Beach, Lewes is one of the principal cities of Delaware's rapidly growing Cape Region.

    • 13 ft (4 m)
    • Sussex
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  6. Category:Delaware - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Delaware

    Pages in category "Delaware" The following 6 pages are in this category, out of 6 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ().

  7. Delaware, Ohio - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delaware,_Ohio
    • Overview
    • History
    • Geography
    • Demographics
    • Arts and culture
    • Politics

    Delaware is a city in and the county seat of Delaware County, Ohio, United States. Delaware was founded in 1808 and was incorporated in 1816. It is located near the center of Ohio, is about 30 miles north of Columbus, and is part of the Columbus, Ohio metropolitan area. The population was 34,753 at the 2010 census, while the Columbus-Marion-Chillicothe, OH Combined Statistical Area has 2,002,604 people.

    While the city and county of Delaware are named for the Delaware tribe, the city of Delaware itself was founded on a Mingo village called Pluggy's Town. The first recorded settler was Joseph Barber in 1807. Shortly afterward, other men started settling in the area; namely: Moses Byxbe, William Little, Solomon Smith, Elder Jacob Drake, Thomas Butler, and Ira Carpenter. In 1808, Moses Byxbe built the first framed house on William Street. Born in Delware County in 1808, Charles Sweetser went on to

    Delaware is located at 40°17′56″N 83°4′19″W / 40.29889°N 83.07194°W / 40.29889; -83.07194. The city is located approximately 24 miles north of Ohio's capital city, Columbus, due north along U.S. Route 23. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 19.07 square miles, of which 18.95 square miles are land and 0.12 square miles is water. The Olentangy River runs through the city.

    As of the census of 2010, there were 34,753 people, 13,253 households, and 8,579 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,833.9 inhabitants per square mile. There were 14,192 housing units at an average density of 748.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the

    As of the census of 2000, there were 25,243 people, 9,520 households, and 6,359 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,682.9 people per square mile. There were 10,208 housing units at an average density of 680.5 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city

    Delaware is the location of Ohio Wesleyan University, one of the Five Colleges of Ohio, one of many liberal arts colleges in the United States with declining enrollment. The city is famous for The Little Brown Jug, an internationally famous harness race which is part of the Tripl

    The Delaware downtown is the epicenter of the city. It boasts The Strand Theatre, the longest continually operating movie theater in Ohio, many restaurants, most with outdoor eating spaces. Quaint boutiques, antique shops, breweries, wineries, bookstores, yoga and dance studios a

    The Historic Northwest Neighborhood boasts more than 500 homes and carriage houses listed on the National Register of Historic Places, all recognized as worthy of preservation for local, state and national significance in American history and architecture. Each home, distinctivel

    Politically the city's population is moderate to conservative, with most of the Ohio Wesleyan University voting for liberal candidates and a majority of the permanent population being Republican.

    • 43K
    • Ohio
  8. Delaware North - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delaware_North

    Delaware North is a global food service and hospitality company headquartered in Buffalo, New York. The company also operates in the lodging, sporting, airport, gambling and entertainment industries.

  9. Delaware – Wikipedia

    sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delaware

    Delaware är en amerikansk delstat som ligger på Atlantkusten i regionen Mid-Atlantic i USA. [4] Delstaten har fått sitt namn från Thomas West, 3:e baron De La Warr, en brittisk adelsman och Virginias första koloniala guvernör efter vad (det som numera kallas) Cape Henlopen ursprungligen hette.

  10. Geographical and historical treatment of Delaware, including maps and a survey of its people, economy, and government. The first of the original 13 states to ratify the federal Constitution, Delaware occupies a small niche in the Boston-Washington, D.C., urban corridor along the Middle Atlantic seaboard.

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