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  1. Dengue fever Disease Reference Guide - Drugs.com

    www.drugs.com/mcd/dengue-fever
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention
    • Diagnosis
    • Treatment
    • Preparing For An Appointment

    Dengue (DENG-gey) fever is a mosquito-borne disease that occurs in tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Mild dengue fever causes a high fever, rash, and muscle and joint pain. A severe form of dengue fever, also called dengue hemorrhagic fever, can cause severe bleeding, a sudden drop in blood pressure (shock) and death. Millions of cases of dengue infection occur worldwide each year. Dengue fever is most common in Southeast Asia and the western Pacific islands, but the disease has been increasing rapidly in Latin America and the Caribbean. Researchers are working on dengue fever vaccines. For now the best prevention is to reduce mosquito habitat in areas where dengue fever is common.

    Many people, especially children and teens, may experience no signs or symptoms during a mild case of dengue fever. When symptoms do occur, they usually begin four to seven days after you are bitten by an infected mosquito. Dengue fever causes a high fever — 104 F degrees — and at least two of the following symptoms: 1. Headache 2. Muscle, bone and joint pain 3. Nausea 4. Vomiting 5. Pain behind the eyes 6. Swollen glands 7. Rash Most people recover within a week or so. In some cases, symptoms worsen and can become life-threatening. Blood vessels often become damaged and leaky. And the number of clot-forming cells (platelets) in your bloodstream drops. This can cause a severe form of dengue fever, called dengue hemorrhagic fever, severe dengue or dengue shock syndrome. Signs and symptoms of dengue hemorrhagic fever or severe dengue — a life-threatening emergency — include: 1. Severe abdominal pain 2. Persistent vomiting 3. Bleeding from your gums or nose 4. Blood in your urine, stoo...

    Dengue fever is caused by any one of four types of dengue viruses spread by mosquitoes that thrive in and near human lodgings. When a mosquito bites a person infected with a dengue virus, the virus enters the mosquito. When the infected mosquito then bites another person, the virus enters that person's bloodstream. After you've recovered from dengue fever, you have immunity to the type of virus that infected you — but not to the other three dengue fever virus types. The risk of developing severe dengue fever, also known as dengue hemorrhagic fever, actually increases if you're infected a second, third or fourth time.

    Factors that put you at greater risk of developing dengue fever or a more severe form of the disease include: 1. Living or traveling in tropical areas.Being in tropical and subtropical areas increases your risk of exposure to the virus that causes dengue fever. Especially high-risk areas are Southeast Asia, the western Pacific islands, Latin America and the Caribbean. 2. Prior infection with a dengue fever virus.Previous infection with a dengue fever virus increases your risk of having severe symptoms if you're infected again.

    If severe, dengue fever can damage the lungs, liver or heart. Blood pressure can drop to dangerous levels, causing shock and, in some cases, death.

    One dengue fever vaccine, Dengvaxia, is currently approved for use in those ages 9 to 45 who live in areas with a high incidence of dengue fever. The vaccine is given in three doses over the course of 12 months. Dengvaxia prevents dengue infections slightly more than half the time. The vaccine is approved only for older children because younger vaccinated children appear to be at increased risk of severe dengue fever and hospitalization two years after receiving the vaccine. The World Health Organization stresses that the vaccine is not an effective tool, on its own, to reduce dengue fever in areas where the illness is common. Controlling the mosquito population and human exposure is still the most critical part of prevention efforts. So for now, if you're living or traveling in an area where dengue fever is known to be, the best way to avoid dengue fever is to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes that carry the disease. If you are living or traveling in tropical areas where dengue feve...

    Diagnosing dengue fever can be difficult, because its signs and symptoms can be easily confused with those of other diseases — such as malaria, leptospirosis and typhoid fever. Your doctor will likely ask about your medical and travel history. Be sure to describe international trips in detail, including the countries you visited and the dates, as well as any contact you may have had with mosquitoes. Certain laboratory tests can detect evidence of the dengue viruses, but test results usually come back too late to help direct treatment decisions.

    No specific treatment for dengue fever exists. Your doctor may recommend that you drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration from vomiting and a high fever. While recovering from dengue fever, watch for signs and symptoms of dehydration. Call your doctor right away if you develop any of the following: 1. Decreased urination 2. Few or no tears 3. Dry mouth or lips 4. Lethargy or confusion 5. Cold or clammy extremities Acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) can alleviate pain and reduce fever. Avoid pain relievers that can increase bleeding complications — such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve, others). If you have severe dengue fever, you may need: 1. Supportive care in a hospital 2. Intravenous (IV) fluid and electrolyte replacement 3. Blood pressure monitoring 4. Transfusion to replace blood loss

    You'll likely start by seeing your primary care provider. But you might also be referred to a doctor who specializes in infectious diseases. Because appointments can be brief, and because there's often a lot of ground to cover, it's a good idea to be well-prepared for your appointment. Here's some information to help you get ready, and what to expect from your doctor.

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  3. New antiviral mechanism for dengue therapeutics -- ScienceDaily

    www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/07/...

    Jul 13, 2020 · A multidisciplinary team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a new mechanism for designing antiviral drugs for dengue virus.

  4. List of Dengue Fever Medications (1 Compared) - Drugs.com

    www.drugs.com/condition/dengue-fever.html

    As many as 80% of people infected with dengue virus have no symptoms or mild fever whereas others develop more severe symptoms of dengue fever. For those who are symptomatic, the symptoms start 4 to 7 days after being bitten from an infected mosquito and involve high fevers, headache behind the eyes, nausea, vomiting, skin rash, muscle and ...

  5. New Mechanism for Identifying Drugs for Dengue Discovered

    www.medindia.net/news/new-mechanism-for...

    New mechanism for designing antiviral drugs for dengue virus has been identified. The study details are published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Dengue virus is a very ...

  6. Researchers uncover new mechanism for designing antiviral ...

    www.news-medical.net/news/20200714/Novel...

    Jul 14, 2020 · A multidisciplinary team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a new mechanism for designing antiviral drugs for dengue virus. The study is currently available in ...

  7. In this review, the design of peptide drugs, antiviral activities and mechanisms of peptides and peptidomimetics (modified peptides) action against dengue virus are discussed. The development of peptides as inhibitors for viral entry, replication and translation is also described, with a focus on the three main targets, namely, the host cell ...

  8. Dengue Medication: Analgesics, Volume Expanders, Vaccines ...

    emedicine.medscape.com/article/215840-medication

    May 03, 2019 · Green S, Rothman A. Immunopathological mechanisms in dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever. Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2006 Oct. 19(5):429-36. . Guzman MG, Alvarez M, Rodriguez-Roche R, Bernardo L, Montes T, Vazquez S. Neutralizing antibodies after infection with dengue 1 virus. Emerg Infect Dis. 2007 Feb. 13(2):282-6. .

  9. Dengue virus - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dengue_virus

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the cause of dengue fever.It is a mosquito-borne, single positive-stranded RNA virus of the family Flaviviridae; genus Flavivirus. Five serotypes of the virus have been found, all of which can cause the full spectrum of disease.

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