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      • To find out if you have Viking heritage, first, you should start a family tree. You can do this using online ancestry sources or via your local records office. Additionally, you can do a DNA test to see where your ancestors came from. The Vikings were an incredible group of people known for their intelligence and bravery.
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  2. Can we know if our ancestors were Vikings? The short answer is yes, we can. DNA testing may trace Viking background in our genetic makeup. However, Nordic ancestry cannot be proven or disproven in all cases.

  3. Oct 09, 2019 · So having Viking ancestry, among other things, means a person is a descendant of someone who was born in Scandinavia. However, with respect to our genes, there is no such thing as “stemming from Scandinavia”. We all stem from Africa. But some of us have ancestor lines that passed through Denmark, Norway or Sweden at some point in time.

  4. Oct 26, 2021 · The Vikings were also known as the Norsemen or North Men. They were skilled seafarers, farmers and warriors that originated in the Nordic regions of Northern Europe. The Vikings were so influential that the years 793 to 1066 AD are known as the Viking Age. Today, we know the Nordic regions of Europe as Scandinavia.

  5. This is done by comparing different genetic profiles against each other and helping to define whether someone was likely to be a Viking, a Thrall, an Angle, a Jute, or could be classed under one of the other subclades below. I-Y17395 — Scotland. I-M227 — Baltic countries, Russia, Poland, France and southern England.

    • Iceland – 99%
    • Scandinavia (Denmark, Norway, Sweden) – 80%
    • Finland – 70%
    • The Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania) – 70%
    • The U.K. – 60%
    • Ireland – 60%
    • Western France – 40%
    • Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus – 40%
    • The Netherlands – 30%
    • Spain and Portugal – 5%

    Iceland started as a colony of Norwegian settlers seeking to escape the political turmoil in their homeland. Their history is preserved in the Icelandic Sagas, a body of documents that record the oral tradition of the Icelanders from the Viking Age. The Saga of Egill Skallagrimson, in particular, tells of men betaking themselves a-Viking, and from ...

    At the start of the Viking Age (~late 8th century A.D.) Scandinavia, roughly defined as modern-day Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, shared a common culture, as verified in the archeological record. These are the lands where the Vikings got their start. Over the three centuries we today call the Viking Age, Scandinavia diverged both culturally and lingu...

    Although the people who lived in the area known today as Finland were not part of the shared cultural boundary of Scandinavia at the outset of the Viking Age, they did over time work their way into the fabric of the Viking Age. Swedes trading with Constantinople relied on the Finns to provide the raw materials for trade, and Viking chieftains quick...

    As early as the 7th Century A.D., Swedes from the island of Gotland started to move eastward. They established a colony at what is now Grobina, in Latvia, and that colony would help to facilitate the broader expansion of Viking activity in the eastern river systems. Graves from the Grobina colony reveal a shifting trend in the kinds of people who l...

    In the 9th century, Danish Vikings carved out half of Britain for themselves in a territory called the Danelaw. Their capital was a thriving Norse city called Jorvik, today called York. In 1066, England was again invaded, this time by William the Conquerer. William brought with him Norman knights, a group of francophone Danish noblemen who could be...

    Before the arrival of the Norwegian Vikings, the Irish people were quite insular. They had few coastal settlements and spent the entire period from the fall of Rome to the early medieval period culturally frozen in time. When the Vikings arrived, they founded several coastal settlements in what are today Dublin, Waterford, Cork, Limerick, among oth...

    Normandy is the obvious region of France one thinks of when invoking of the Vikings, but Brittany and Aquitaine were also heavily frequented by those who roved. In fact, the whole of the Brittany region was held under Viking occupation for three decades until the Bretons re-conquered it under the banner of Alain Barbe-Torte. If you are from Western...

    Although the tribe of Swedish Vikings known as the Rus gave their name to Russia, the likelihood of having a Viking ancestor is far less there than in Finland and the Baltic States. When the Rus founded the city-states of Kyiv and Novgorod, they established themselves as rulers over the Slavs who comprised the vast majority of the population. If we...

    The Netherlands, known in the Viking Age as Frisia, was heavily raided for centuries and colonized on multiple occasions by the Danes. Most famous was Rurik of Dorestad, the first Viking chieftain to receive an enfeoffment from the Carolingians. In the long run, however, the Carolingians maintained too strong a hold over the region, stifling long t...

    The coast of Asturias, an early medieval kingdom in the north of Spain, was attacked several times by the Vikings. What’s more, a Viking fleet successfully sacked Lisbon and captured Seville in 844, inflicting great fear in the Moors. However, Viking activity in Iberia remained sparse. Following the humiliating defeats at the hands of the Norsemen,...

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