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    • Nordic Ancestry DNA Basic Theory and Terminology
    • Viking Background Haplogroups
    • Subclades That Point to Viking Genetics
    • How to Order DNA Test For Viking Ancestry

    So having Viking ancestry, among other things, means a person is a descendant of someone who was born in Scandinavia. However, with respect to our genes, there is no such thing as “stemming from Scandinavia”. We all stem from Africa. But some of us have ancestor lines that passed through Denmark, Norway or Sweden at some point in time. We’re interested in those who did so during the Viking Age (AD 793—1066). In order to understand what genetic markers may help us find out if one has Viking an...

    The most important haplogroup that may be a strong predictor of Viking genetic background is I1. But also R1a, R1b, G2, N, and a few others may well point to your Viking roots.SNP that defines I1 haplogroup is M253.It is critical to understand that not all Vikings were I1 and not all I1 were Vikings. I1 was a modification of I that emerged about 27,000 years ago. To be sure, no Vikings were anywhere to be seen at that time. How come it is now believed to predict your Nordic ancestry?Modern Sc...

    Haplogroups have subgroups called subclades. Subclades are branches within haplogroups defined by consecutive new mutations. For a regularly updated complete I1 haplogroup tree with all subclades check this page. Mutations occur once in a certain number of generations. Comparing various genetic profiles, the emergence of some mutations could be located in time and space. This allows to associate certain subclades with Viking activities in various parts of Europe. Here are some subclades that...

    A good place to start would be learning your haplogroup. This can be done through testing for Y-DNA STR markers. STRs do not directly define haplogroups (SNPs do) but STRs can be used to predict your haplogroup with a high degree of certainty. The more markers are tested, the higher is test quality. Standard sets are 37, 67 and 111 markers. In certain genetic projects also sets of 12 and 25 markers may be tested. The more markers are tested, the higher the price. For the comparison chart, see...

  1. Can you find out if you have Viking Heritage? | Living DNA

    livingdna.com › blog › Viking-Heritage

    If we are speaking ethnically, the closest people to a Viking in modern-day terms would be the Danish, Norwegians, Swedish, and Icelandic people. Interestingly though, it was common for their male Viking ancestors to intermarry with other nationalities, and so there is a lot of mixed heritage.

  2. Are You Part Viking? - Ancestry Blog

    blogs.ancestry.ca › cm › are-you-part-viking
    • “There’s a Little Viking in Everyone” A common question from people who take the AncestryDNA and see “Scandinavian” in their results is, “Does that mean I’m part Viking?”
    • My “Viking” DNA Story. Many people with British and Irish heritage (and no known Scandinavian ancestors) may be surprised do discover traces of Scandinavian ethnicity in their AncestryDNA test results.
    • Vikings in the UK and Ireland. For many, the Viking Age in England began in earnest in June of 793, when Vikings destroyed the abbey on Lindisfarne, on an island off the northeastern coast.
    • Traces of Vikings Remain Today. Many mark the end of the Viking Age in England in 1066. In that year, the Saxon King Harold Godwinson defeated the Norwegian King Harald III at the Battle of Stamford Bridge.
  3. Are you part viking? - Ancestry Blog AU

    blogs.ancestry.com.au › cm › are-you-part-viking

    Sep 21, 2017 · Many mark the end of the Viking Age in England in 1066. In that year, the Saxon King Harold Godwinson defeated the Norwegian King Harald III at the Battle of Stamford Bridge. But echoes of the Danelaw remain. Place names ending in-howe and -thorp have Norse origins. English words like husband, sky, and window also hark back to Viking times.

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  5. Do you have Viking blood? – Bjørn Larssen

    www.bjornlarssen.com › 05 › do-you-have-viking-blood

    Feb 05, 2019 · The best chances of having a trace of Viking blood – remember that quite a few generations have passed since the year 1066 – come from having been born in the UK, ideally with ancestors who didn’t travel much once they killed the monks.

  6. That would imply Scottish and Viking heritage :-) :-) :-) My last name is Scottish (AND English) so I could join a Scottish clan. Lol. Us Americans have such a love for Scotland and Ireland it’s funny because I feel like they laugh at us with our clans and our fascination with all things Celtic.

  7. Do you have an Irish Viking Surname? - A Letter from Ireland:

    www.aletterfromireland.com › irish-viking-surname
    • Vikings and County Wicklow.
    • Irish Surnames of Viking Origin.
    • Hiberno-Norse Surnames.

    Speaking of County Wicklow, did you know that Wicklow comes from the Norse “Vykyngelo” – meaning a “Viking meadow”? Let’s stay on that subject of Vikings for the rest of today’s letter. One of the most frequent enquiries I receive goes something like: Just last year, we were on an Irish Homelands trip to County Wicklow. County Wicklow received its name after the local Viking-named town of Wicklow/Vykyngelo. The port was a hive of activity as longboats were prepared for filming the next series of the TV show “Vikings.” Have you seen this show following the adventures of the Norse King Ragnar and his crew? There was also an open casting call for extras for the next season – we were tempted, but I’d probably have to hide the razor for couple of months!

    So, do you have any Irish surnames of Viking origin in your family tree? Well, John Grenham makes the following very good point in an article on that very subject: However, he does go on to acknowledge that we Irish took to the surname system with great gusto – eager to demonstrate our extended family allegiances. So, it is believed that we had the earliest surname system in Europe with the specific surname of O’Clearyfrom about the 10th century. By that time, the age of the great Viking expansion was coming to an end. In Ireland, we first experienced the Vikings during a raid on Lambay island (off the coast of present County Dublin) in 795AD and over the following years, the raiding parties started to settle around harbours about the east and south coast of Ireland. These settlements grew into the modern towns and cities of Dublin, Waterford, Wexford, Cork and Limerick. Over the following 200 years, the inhabitants of those towns had being trading, mixing and marrying with the loca...

    Many given first names of Norse origin became popular with Irish Gaelic families. Names like: Otir, Lochlan, Ivor, Olaf, Sitricand so on. So, a little like we do today – someone saw a name they liked and adopted it for one of their children – and this name then carried down in a family through the generations, increasing in popularity and frequency. As you may know, the Irish system of surnames usually structures a name as either “son of a given name” (Mac) or “descendant of a given name (O). Many of the given names of Norse origin worked their way into a number of surnames that we consider Irish today. Names like: 1. McAuliffe– “son of Olaf”. 2. O’Rourke/Groarke– “descendent/son of Ruarc” 3. McCotter– “son of Otir” 4. McManus– “son of Magnus” 5. McGettrick– “son of Sitric” 6. McIver– “son of Ivor” 7. O’Loughlin/McLoughlin– “son of Lochlann” Other Irish surnames that have similar roots in a given Norse name include: Arthur, O’Beirne, McBirney, Bligh, Boland, Broder, Broderick, O’Goh...

  8. Are you a viking? - gotoquiz.com

    www.gotoquiz.com › are_you_a_viking_1

    Are you a viking? i am a norwegian norn and my ancestors were great vikings like naddod, who discovered iceland, but anyway, i made this quiz to see how many of you are strong, powerfull vikings!!! so in this quiz find out if you have what it takes to kill a brit with your butthole.MONEY IN THE BANK SHAWTY WHAT YOU FART!!! man i hate how you ...

  9. Blood of the Irish: What DNA Tells Us About the Ancestry of ...

    owlcation.com › stem › Irish-Blood-Genetic-Identity
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    Research done into the DNA of the Irish has shown that our old understanding of where the population of Ireland originated may have been misguided. The modern Irish population share many genetic similarities with Scottish and Welsh populations, and to a lesser extent the English. At the same time, DNA testing of remains of ancient Irish people suggests that some of the earliest human arrivals on the island originally came from much further afield. Another interesting finding about Irish DNA is that many men in North West Ireland (and their descendants around the world, including about 2% of men in New York today) are descended from a single man who lived in Ireland around 1600-1700 years ago. This coincides with the time of the famous Irish king Niall of the Nine Hostages, who legend says brought St Patrick to Ireland as a slave. The O'Neill family, who claim to descend from Niall, have certainly been a powerful family through the ages in Ireland. Meanwhile, the latest research in 2018 suggests that the Irish are most closely related to people in North West France (Brittany where a Celtic language has traditionally been spoken) and in Western Norway. Interestingly, where earlier studies didn't find much impact of Viking DNA among the modern Irish, a recent study suggests there may have been more influence than perviously thought. You can read more details here: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-17124-4 Today, people living the north of Spain in the region known as the Basque Country share many DNA traits with the Irish. However, the Irish also share their DNA to a large extent with the people of Britain, especially the Scottish and Welsh. DNA testing of the male Y chromosome has shown that Irish males have the highest incidence of the R1b haplogroup in Europe. While other parts of Europe have integrated continuous waves of new settlers from the east, Ireland's remote geographical position has meant that the Irish gene-pool has been less susceptible to change. The same genes have been passed down from parents to children for thousands of years. The other region with very high levels of this male chromosome is the Basque region. This is mirrored in genetic studies which have compared DNA analysis with Irish surnames. Many surnames in Irish are Gaelic surnames, suggesting that the holder of the surname is a descendant of people who lived in Ireland long before the English conquests of the Middle Ages. Men with Gaelic surnames, showed the highest incidences of Haplogroup 1 (or Rb1) gene. This means that those Irish whose ancestors pre-date English conquest of the island are descendants (in the male line) of people who probably migrated west across Europe, as far as Ireland in the north and Spain in the south. However, more recent studies confirm that when a complex picture is taken of Irish DNA, including both male and female lines of descent, the closest similarities are between the Irish and people living in Western Britain. In particular, people in the north of Ireland are close genetic relatives of those living in Western Scotland, probably due to a long history of migration between the two regions. However, research into both British and Irish DNA suggests that people on the two islands have much genetically in common. Males in both islands have a strong predominance of the Haplogroup 1 gene, meaning that most of us in the British Isles are descended from the same stone age settlers. The main difference is the degree to which later migrations of people to the islands affected the population's DNA. Parts of Ireland (most notably the western seaboard) have been almost untouched by outside genetic influence since early times. Men there with traditional Irish surnames have the highest incidence of the Haplogroup 1 gene - over 99%. Irish and Scottish people share very similar DNA. The obvious similarities of culture, pale skin, tendency to red hair have historically been prescribed to the two people's sharing a common Celtic ancestry. Actually, in my opinion, it seems much more likely that the similarity results from the movement of people from the north of Ireland into Scotland in the centuries 400 - 800 AD. At this time the kingdom of Dalriada, based near Ballymoney in County Antrim extended far into Scotland. The Irish invaders brought Gaelic language and culture, and they also brought their genes. The MC1R gene has been identified by researchers as the gene responsible for red hair as well as the accompanying fair skin and tendency towards freckles. According to genetic research, genes for red hair first appeared in human beings about 40,000 to 50,000 years ago. Some readers, writing below, with typical Black Irish coloring have had genetic testing done to confirm that they have Spanish, Portuguese, and Canary Island heritage.

    The earliest settlers came to Ireland during the Stone Age, around 10,000 years ago. There are still remnants of their presence scattered across the island. Mountsandel in Coleraine in the North of Ireland is the oldest known site of settlement in Irelandremains of woven huts, stone tools and food such as berries and hazelnuts were discovered at the site in 1972.

    Keltoi was the name given by the Ancient Greeks to a 'barbaric' (in their eyes) people who lived to the north of them in central Europe. While early Irish art shows some similarities of style to central European art of the Keltoi, historians have also recognized many significant differences between the two cultures. One theory about the origins of the term is that it describes Irish people who descend from survivors of the Spanish Armada. There are other hypotheses, mostly placing Irish ancestors on the Iberian peninsula or among the traders that sailed back and forth between Spain, North Africa, and Ireland, particularly around the Connemara region.

    Recent research into Irish DNA at the beginning of the twenty-first century suggests that the early inhabitants of Ireland were not directly descended from the Keltoi of central Europe. Genome sequencing performed on remains of early settlers in Ireland by researchers at Trinity University in Dublin and Queens University has revealed at least two waves of migration to the island in past millennia. Analysis of the remains of a 5,200 year-old Irish farmer suggested that the population of Ireland at that time was closely genetically related to the modern-day populations of southern Europe, especially Spain and Sardinia. Her ancestors, however, originally migrated from the Middle East, the cradle of agriculture. Meanwhile, the research team also examined the remains of three 4,000 year-old men from the Bronze Age and revealed that another wave of migration to Ireland had taken place, this time from the edges of Eastern Europe. One third of their ancestry came from the Steppe region of Russia and Ukraine, so their ancestors must have gradually spread west across Europe. These remains, found on Rathlin Island also shared a close genetic affinity with the Scottish, Welsh, and modern Irish, unlike the earlier farmer. This suggests that many people living in Ireland today have genetic links to people who were living on the island at least 4,000 years ago. Most interestingly, the book says that the group which then came to Ireland and fully established itself as rulers of the island were the Milesiansthe sons of Mil, a soldier from Spain. Modern DNA research into male Y chromosomes has found that the the R1b haplogroup reaches very high concentrations in Western Ireland and the Basque country in northern Spain. While the picture for matrilineal descent (mother to daughter) is more complex, it seems that the northern Spanish and the Irish might have common male ancestors at some point in history.

    One of the oldest texts composed in Ireland is the Leabhar Gabhla, the Book of Invasions. It tells a semi-mythical history of the waves of people who settled in Ireland in earliest times. It says the first settlers to arrive in Ireland were a small dark people called the Fir Bolg, followed by a magical super-race called the Tuatha de Danaan (the people of the goddess Dana).

    What we can take from all of this is that, although the Irish today feel part of a single group united by cultural and national identity, this culture and identity is ultimately founded on waves of migration connecting the island to the wider world of European peoples and beyond.

    Some scholars even argue that the Iberian peninsula (modern-day Spain and Portugal) was once heavily populated by Celtiberians who spoke at now-extinct Celtic language. They believe some of these people moved northwards along the Atlantic coast bringing Celtic language and culture to Ireland and Britain, as well as France. Although the evidence in not conclusive, the findings on the similarities between Irish and Iberian DNA provides some support for this theory.

    I live in Northern Ireland and in this small country the differences between the Irish and the British can still seem very important. Blood has been spilt over the question of national identity.

    The origin of the term \\"Black Irish\\" and the people it describes are debated (see the comments below!). The phrase is ambiguous and is mainly used outside of Ireland to describe dark-haired people of Irish origin.

    Some \\"Black Irish\\" are of Irish-African descent, tracing their ancestry back to the slave trade. Many of these people live on Barbados and Montserrat.

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