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  1. dys·en·ter·y

    /ˈdis(ə)nˌterē/

    noun

    • 1. infection of the intestines resulting in severe diarrhea with the presence of blood and mucus in the feces.
  2. People also ask

    What is dysentery and how is it treated?

    Is dysentery the same as diarrhea?

    What does dysentary mean?

    How does dysentery affect the body?

  3. Dysentery - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dysentery

    Dysentery may also be caused by shigellosis, an infection by bacteria of the genus Shigella, and is then known as bacillary dysentery (or Marlow syndrome).The term bacillary dysentery etymologically might seem to refer to any dysentery caused by any bacilliform bacteria, but its meaning is restricted by convention to Shigella dysentery.

  4. Dysentery: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention

    www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/what-is-dysentery

    Dysentery is an infection in your intestines that causes bloody diarrhea. It can be caused by a parasite or bacteria.

  5. Dysentery | Definition of Dysentery by Merriam-Webster

    www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dysentery

    Dysentery definition is - a disease characterized by severe diarrhea with passage of mucus and blood and usually caused by infection.

  6. Dysentery | definition of dysentery by Medical dictionary

    medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/dysentery

    Definition Dysentery is a general term for a group of gastrointestinal disorders characterized by inflammation of the intestines, particularly the colon. Characteristic features include abdominal pain and cramps, straining at stool (tenesmus), and frequent passage of watery diarrhea or stools containing blood and mucus.

  7. Dysentery | Definition of Dysentery at Dictionary.com

    www.dictionary.com/browse/dysentery

    A painful disease of the intestines characterized by inflammation and diarrhea. Dysentery may be caused by bacteria or viruses, or may occur as the result of infestation by an amoeba.

  8. Dysentery is a significant cause of illness and death in young children, particularly those who live in less-developed countries. There are two major types: bacillary dysentery and amebic dysentery, caused respectively by bacteria and by amoebas.

  9. DYSENTERY | definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary

    dictionary.cambridge.org/.../english/dysentery

    / ˈdɪs. ə n.t ə r.i / a disease of the bowels that causes the contents to be passed out of the body much more often and in a more liquid form than usual. It is caused by an infection that is spread by dirty water or food. SMART Vocabulary: related words and phrases

  10. Dysentery | Encyclopedia.com

    www.encyclopedia.com/.../pathology/dysentery
    • Definition
    • Description
    • Causes & Symptoms
    • Diagnosis
    • Treatment
    • Alternative Treatments
    • Prognosis
    • Prevention
    • Key Terms
    • Resources

    Dysentery is a general term for a group of gastrointestinal disorders characterized by inflammation of the intestines, particularly the colon. Characteristic features include abdominal pain and cramps, straining at stool (tenesmus), and frequent passage of watery diarrhea or stools containing blood and mucus. The English word dysentery comes from two Greek words meaning \\"ill\\" or \\"bad\\" and \\"intestine.\\"It should be noted that some doctors use the word \\"dysentery\\" to refer only to the first two...

    Dysentery is a common but potentially serious disorder of the digestive tract that occurs throughout the world. It can be caused by a number of infectious agents ranging from viruses and bacteria to protozoa and parasitic worms; it may also result from chemical irritation of the intestines. Dysentery is one of the oldest known gastrointestinal disorders, having been described as early as the Peloponnesian War in the fifth century b.c. Epidemics of dysentery were frequent occurrences aboard sa...

    The most common types of dysentery and their causal agents are as follows: 1. Bacillary dysentery. Bacillary dysentery, which is also known as shigellosis, is caused by four species of the genus Shigella: S. dysenteriae, the most virulent species and the one most likely to cause epidemics; S. sonnei, the mildest species and the most common form of Shigella found in the United States; S. boydii ; and S. flexneri. S. flexneri is the species that causes Reiter's syndrome, a type of arthritis tha...

    The physical examination in the primary care doctor's office will not usually allow the doctor to determine the specific parasite or other disease agent that is causing the bloody diarrhea and other symptoms of dysentery, although the presence or absence of fever may help to narrow the diagnostic possibilities. The patient's age and history are usually better sources of information. The doctor may ask about such matters as the household water supply and food preparation habits, recent contact...

    Medications are the primary form of treatment for dysentery: 1. Bacillary dysentery. Dysentery caused by Shigella is usually treated with such antibiotics as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra), nalidixic acid (NegGram), or ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Ciloxan). Because the various species of Shigella are becoming resistant to these drugs, however, the doctor may prescribe one of the newer drugs described below. Patients with bacillary dysentery should not be given antidiarrheal medicati...

    There are a number of alternative treatments for dysentery, most of which are derived from plants used by healers for centuries. Because dysentery was known to ancient civilizations as well as modern societies, such alternative systems as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Ayurvedic medicine developed treatments for it.

    Most adults in developed countries recover completely from an episode of dysentery. Children are at greater risk of becoming dehydrated, however; bacillary dysentery in particular can lead to a child's death from dehydration in as little as 12-24 hours. 1. Bacillary dysentery. Most patients recover completely from shigellosis, although their bowel habits may not become completely normal for several months. About 3 percent of people infected by S. flexneri will develop Reiter's syndrome, which...

    The disease agents that cause dysentery do not confer immunity against reinfection at a later date. As of 2005 there are no vaccines for bacillary dysentery or amebic dysentery; however, a vaccine against schistosomiasis is under investigation. An oral vaccine against rotavirus infections was developed for small children but was withdrawn in 2004 because it was associated with an increased risk of small-bowel disorders. Newer vaccines against rotaviruses and caliciviruses are being developed...

    Anthelminthic (also spelled anthelmintic)— A type of drug or herbal preparation given to destroy parasitic worms or expel them from the body.Bacillus— A rod-shaped bacterium. One common type of dysentery is known as bacillary dysentery because it is caused by a bacillus.Enterotoxin— A type of harmful protein released by bacteria and other disease agents that affects the tissues lining the intestines.Fulminant— Occurring or flaring up suddenly and with great severity. A potentially fatal compl...

    Cummings, Stephen, MD, and Dana Ullman, MPH. Everybody's Guide to Homeopathic Medicines, revised and expanded. New York: Jeremy P. Tarcher, 1991.\\"Enterobacteriaceae Infections.\\" Section 13, Chapter 161 in The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy, edited by Mark H. Beers, MD, and Robert Berkow, MD. Whitehouse Station, NJ: Merck Research Laboratories, 2004.\\"Intestinal Protozoa.\\" Section 13, Chapter 161 in The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy, edited by Mark H. Beers, MD, and Robert Berkow...

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