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    Could an E coli infection kill you?

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  2. E. coli - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org › diseases-conditions › e-coli
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria normally live in the intestines of healthy people and animals. Most varieties of E. coli are harmless or cause relatively brief diarrhea. But a few particularly nasty strains, such as E. coli O157:H7, can cause severe abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea and vomiting.You may be exposed to E. coli from contaminated water or food — especially raw vegetables and undercooked ground beef. Healthy adults usually recover from infection with E. coli O157:H7 within a w...

    Signs and symptoms of E. coli O157:H7 infection typically begin three or four days after exposure to the bacteria, though you may become ill as soon as one day after to more than a week later. Signs and symptoms include: 1. Diarrhea, which may range from mild and watery to severe and bloody 2. Abdominal cramping, pain or tenderness 3. Nausea and vomiting, in some people

    Among the many strains of E. coli, only a few trigger diarrhea. One group of E. coli — which includes O157:H7 — produces a powerful toxin that damages the lining of the small intestine, which can cause bloody diarrhea. You develop an E. coli infection when you ingest this strain of bacteria.Unlike many other disease-causing bacteria, E. coli can cause an infection even if you ingest only small amounts. Because of this, you can be sickened by E. coli from eating a slightly undercooked hamburge...

    E. coli can affect anyone who is exposed to the bacteria. But some people are more likely to develop problems than are others. Risk factors include: 1. Age. Young children and older adults are at higher risk of experiencing illness caused by E. coli and more-serious complications from the infection. 2. Weakened immune systems. People who have weakened immune systems — from AIDS or drugs to treat cancer or prevent the rejection of organ transplants — are more likely to become ill from ingestin...

    Most healthy adults recover from E. coli illness within a week. Some people — particularly young children and older adults — may develop a life-threatening form of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    No vaccine or medication can protect you from E. coli-based illness, though researchers are investigating potential vaccines. To reduce your chance of being exposed to E. coli, avoid risky foods and watch out for cross-contamination.

  3. Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) are bacteria found in the environment, foods, and intestines of people and animals. E. coli are a large and diverse group of bacteria. Although most strains of E. coli are harmless, others can make you sick.

  4. E. coli: What is It, How Does it Cause Infection, Symptoms ...

    my.clevelandclinic.org › 16638-e-coli-infection
    • Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC): This is the bacteria most commonly known for E. coli food contamination. This...
    • Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC): This strain is commonly known as a cause of travelers’ diarrhea.
    • Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC).
    • Enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC).
  5. Escherichia coli - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Escherichia_coli

    Escherichia coli (/ ˌ ɛ ʃ ə ˈ r ɪ k i ə ˈ k oʊ l aɪ /), also known as E. coli (/ ˌ iː ˈ k oʊ l aɪ /), is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, rod-shaped, coliform bacterium of the genus Escherichia that is commonly found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms (endotherms).

  6. E. Coli Bacteria Infection: Symptoms, Treatment, Causes ...

    www.webmd.com › food-poisoning › what-is-e-coli

    E. coli (Escherichia coli), is a type of bacteria that normally lives in your intestines. It’s also found in the gut of some animals. Most types of E. coli are harmless and even help keep your...

  7. Questions and Answers | E. coli | CDC

    www.cdc.gov › ecoli › general

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria normally live in the intestines of people and animals. Most E. coli are harmless and actually are an important part of a healthy human intestinal tract. However, some E. coli are pathogenic, meaning they can cause illness, either diarrhea or illness outside of the intestinal tract.

  8. E. coli - WHO

    www.who.int › news-room › fact-sheets
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Sources and Transmission
    • Prevention
    • Who Response

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a bacterium that is commonly found in the gut of humans and warm-blooded animals. Most strains of E. coli are harmless. Some strains however, such as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), can cause severe foodborne disease. It is transmitted to humans primarily through consumption of contaminated foods, such as raw or undercooked ground meat products, raw milk, and contaminated raw vegetables and sprouts. STEC produces toxins, known as Shiga-toxins because of the...

    Symptoms of the diseases caused by STEC include abdominal cramps and diarrhoea that may in some cases progress to bloody diarrhoea (haemorrhagic colitis). Fever and vomiting may also occur. The incubation period can range from 3 to 8 days, with a median of 3 to 4 days. Most patients recover within 10 days, but in a small proportion of patients (particularly young children and the elderly), the infection may lead to a life-threatening disease, such as haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). HUS is...

    Most available information on STEC relates to serotype O157:H7, since it is easily differentiated biochemically from other E. coli strains. The reservoir of this pathogen appears to be mainly cattle. In addition, other ruminants such as sheep, goats, deer are considered significant reservoirs, while other mammals (such as pigs, horses, rabbits, dogs, and cats) and birds (such as chickens and turkeys) have been found infected. E. coli O157:H7 is transmitted to humans primarily through consumpt...

    The prevention of infection requires control measures at all stages of the food chain, from agricultural production on the farm to processing, manufacturing and preparation of foods in both commercial establishments and household kitchens.

    WHO provides scientific assessments to control STEC in food. These assessments serve as the basis for international food standards, guidelines, and recommendations developed by the Codex Alimentarius Commission.WHO promotes the strengthening of food safety systems by promoting good manufacturing practices and educating retailers and consumers about appropriate food handling and avoiding contamination.During E. coli outbreaks, such as the those in Europe in 2011, WHO supports the coordination...

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