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  1. Catholic Church in the United States - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catholic_Church_in_the...

    Eastern Catholic Churches are churches with origins in Eastern Europe, Asia and Africa that have their own distinctive liturgical, legal and organizational systems and are identified by the national or ethnic character of their region of origin. Each is considered fully equal to the Latin tradition within the Church.

  2. History of the Catholic Church in the United States - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Roman...

    Maryland was one of the few regions among the English colonies in North America that had a sizable Catholic population. However, the 1646 defeat of the Royalists in the English Civil War led to stringent laws against Catholic education and the extradition of known Jesuits from the colony, including Andrew White, and the destruction of their ...

  3. The Eastern Catholic Churches in America. - Free Online Library

    www.thefreelibrary.com/The+Eastern+Catholic...

    Apr 01, 2004 · As the years moved on, a number of other Eastern Catholic churches were recognized by Rome, such as the Syrian church (1656), the Melkite church (1724), the Armenian church (1742), the Chaldean church (1834), and the Coptic church (1899)--all Catholic churches.

  4. LiveLiturgy.com - Eastern Catholic, North America

    liveliturgy.com/eastern-catholic/north-america

    Streaming liturgies from Byzantine (Ruthenian Greek) Catholic, Italo-Greek Byzantine Catholic, Maronite Catholic, Melkite Greek Catholic, Romanian Greek Catholic, Russian Greek Catholic, Syro-Malabar Catholic, Syro-Malankara Catholic, and Ukrainian Greek Catholic churches in the United States and Canada.

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  6. Catholic Church in the United States - WIKI 2. Wikipedia ...

    wiki2.org/en/Catholic_Church_in_the_United_States
    • Organization
    • Personnel
    • Approved Translations of The Bible
    • Institutions
    • Demographics
    • Politics
    • History
    • Servants of God and Those Declared Venerable, Beatified, and Canonized Saints
    • Top Eight Pilgrimage Destinations in The United States
    • Further Reading

    Catholics gather as local com­mu­ni­ties called parishes, headed by a priest, and typ­i­cally meet at a per­ma­nent church build­ing for litur­gies every Sun­day, week­days and on holy days. Within the 196 ge­o­graph­i­cal dio­ce­ses and arch­dio­ce­ses (ex­clud­ing the Arch­dio­cese for the Mil­i­tary Ser­vices), there are 17,651 local Catholic parishes in the United States. The Catholic Church has the third high­est total num­ber of local con­gre­ga­tions in the US be­hind South­ern Bap­tists and United Methodists. How­ever, the av­er­age Catholic parish is sig­nif­i­cantly larger than the av­er­age Bap­tist or Methodist con­gre­ga­tion; there are more than four times as many Catholics as South­ern Bap­tists and more than eight times as many Catholics as United Methodists. In the United States, there are 197 ec­cle­si­as­ti­cal ju­ris­dic­tions: 1. 177 Latin Catholic dioceses 1.1. including 32 Latin Catholic archdioceses 2. 18 Eastern Catholic dioceses (eparchies) 2.1. including 2...

    The Church em­ploys peo­ple in a va­ri­ety of lead­er­ship and ser­vice roles. Its min­is­ters con­sist of or­dained clergy (bish­ops, dea­cons, and pres­byters (priests)) and non-or­dained lay ec­cle­sial min­is­ters, the­olo­gians, and cat­e­chists. Some Chris­tians, both lay and clergy, live in a form of con­se­crated life, rather than in mar­riage. This in­cludes a wide range of re­la­tion­ships, from monas­tic (monks and nuns), to men­di­cant (fri­ars and sis­ters), apos­tolic, sec­u­lar and lay in­sti­tutes. While many of these also serve in some form of min­istry, above, oth­ers are in sec­u­lar ca­reers, within or with­out the Church. Con­se­crated life – in and of it­self – does not make a per­son a part of the clergy or a min­is­ter of the Church, nor even one of its em­ploy­ees. Ad­di­tion­ally, many lay peo­ple are em­ployed in "sec­u­lar" ca­reers in sup­port of Church in­sti­tu­tions, in­clud­ing ed­u­ca­tors, health care pro­fes­sion­als, fi­nance and human re­sources...

    USCCB approved translations

    1991–pre­sent: 1. New American Bible, Revised Edition 2. Books of the New Testament, Alba House 3. Contemporary English Version – New Testament, First Edition, American Bible Society 4. Contemporary English Version – Book of Psalms, American Bible Society 5. Contemporary English Version – Book of Proverbs, American Bible Society 6. The Grail Psalter (Inclusive Language Version), G.I.A. Publications 7. New American Bible, Revised Old Testament 8. New Revised Standard Version, Catholic Edition,...

    Parochial schools

    By the mid­dle of the 19th cen­tury, the Catholics in larger cities started build­ing their own parochial school sys­tem. The main im­pe­tus was fear that ex­po­sure to Protes­tant teach­ers in the pub­lic schools, and Protes­tant fel­low stu­dents, would lead to a loss of faith. Protes­tants re­acted by strong op­po­si­tion to any pub­lic fund­ing of parochial schools.The Catholics nev­er­the­less built their el­e­men­tary schools, parish by parish, using very low paid sis­ters as teachers....

    Universities and colleges

    Ac­cord­ing to the As­so­ci­a­tion of Catholic Col­leges and Uni­ver­si­ties in 2011, there are ap­prox­i­mately 230 Catholic uni­ver­si­ties and col­leges in the United States with nearly 1 mil­lion stu­dents and some 65,000 professors. In 2016, the num­ber of ter­tiary schools fell to 227, while the num­ber of stu­dents also fell to 798,006. The na­tional uni­ver­sity of the Church, founded by the na­tion's bish­ops in 1887, is The Catholic Uni­ver­sity of Amer­ica in Wash­ing­ton, D.C. The...

    Seminaries

    Ac­cord­ing to the 2016 Of­fi­cial Catholic Directory, as of 2016 there were 243 sem­i­nar­ies with 4,785 stu­dents in the United States; 3,629 dioce­san sem­i­nar­i­ans and 1,456 re­li­gious sem­i­nar­i­ans. By the of­fi­cial 2017 sta­tis­tics, there are 5,050 sem­i­nar­i­ans (3,694 dioce­san and 1,356 re­li­gious) in the United States. In ad­di­tion, the Amer­i­can Catholic bish­ops over­see the Pon­tif­i­cal North Amer­i­can Col­lege for Amer­i­can sem­i­nar­i­ans and priests study­ing at...

    There are 70,412,021 reg­is­tered Catholics in the United States (22% of the US pop­u­la­tion) as of 2017, ac­cord­ing to the Amer­i­can bish­ops' count in their Of­fi­cial Catholic Di­rec­tory 2016. This count pri­mar­ily rests on the parish as­sess­ment tax which pas­tors eval­u­ate yearly ac­cord­ing to the num­ber of reg­is­tered mem­bers and con­trib­u­tors. Es­ti­mates of the over­all Amer­i­can Catholic pop­u­la­tion from re­cent years gen­er­ally range around 20% to 28%. Ac­cord­ing to Al­bert J. Menedez, re­search di­rec­tor of "Amer­i­cans for Re­li­gious Lib­erty," many Amer­i­cans con­tinue to call them­selves Catholic but "do not reg­is­ter at local parishes for a va­ri­ety of reasons." Ac­cord­ing to a sur­vey of 35,556 Amer­i­can res­i­dents (re­leased in 2008 by the Pew Forum on Re­li­gion and Pub­lic Life), 23.9% of Amer­i­cans iden­tify them­selves as Catholic (ap­prox­i­mately 72 mil­lion of a na­tional pop­u­la­tion of 306 mil­lion residents). The study notes tha...

    There had never been a Catholic re­li­gious party in the United States, ei­ther local, state or na­tional, sim­i­lar to Chris­t­ian De­mo­c­ra­tic par­ties in Eu­rope and Latin Amer­ica, until the for­ma­tion of the Chris­t­ian Democ­racy Party USA in 2011, now the Amer­i­can Sol­i­dar­ity Party. Since the elec­tion of the Catholic John F. Kennedy as Pres­i­dent in 1960, Catholics have split about 50-50 be­tween the two major par­ties. On so­cial is­sues the Catholic Church takes strong po­si­tions against abor­tion, which was partly le­gal­ized in 1973 by the Supreme Court, and same-sex mar­riage, which was fully le­gal­ized in June 2015. The Church also con­demns em­bryo-de­stroy­ing re­search and in vitro fer­til­iza­tion as im­moral. The Church is al­lied with con­ser­v­a­tive evan­gel­i­cals and other Protes­tants on these is­sues. How­ever, the Catholic Church through­out its his­tory has taken spe­cial con­cern for all vul­ner­a­ble groups. This has led to pro­gres­sive al­li...

    Early period to 1800

    There were small Catholic set­tle­ments in Span­ish and French colonies, es­pe­cially in Cal­i­for­nia, New Mex­ico and Louisiana. Apart from Louisiana, they had only a small role in the his­tory of the Church in the United States. Anti-Catholi­cism was of­fi­cial gov­ern­ment pol­icy for the Eng­lish who set­tled the colonies along the At­lantic seaboard. Mary­land was founded by a Catholic, Lord Bal­ti­more as the first 'non-de­nom­i­na­tional' colony and was the first to ac­com­mo­date Cat...

    19th century

    The num­bers of Catholics surged start­ing in the 1840s as Ger­man, Irish, and other Eu­ro­pean Catholics came in large num­bers. After 1890 Ital­ians and Polescom­prised the largest num­bers of new Catholics, but many coun­tries in Eu­rope con­tributed, as did Que­bec. By 1850, Catholics had be­come the coun­try's largest sin­gle de­nom­i­na­tion. Be­tween 1860 and 1890, their pop­u­la­tion tripled to seven mil­lion. Some anti-Catholic po­lit­i­cal move­ments ap­peared: the Know Noth­ings in...

    20th–21st centuries

    In the era of in­tense em­i­gra­tion from the 1840s to 1914, bish­ops often set up sep­a­rate parishes for major eth­nic groups, such as Ire­land, Ger­many, Poland, French Canada and Italy. In Iowa, the de­vel­op­ment of the Arch­dio­cese of Dubuque, the work of Bishop Loras and the build­ing of St. Raphael's Cathe­dral, to meet the needs of Ger­mans and Irish, is il­lus­tra­tive.By the be­gin­ning of the 20th cen­tury, ap­prox­i­mately one-sixth of the pop­u­la­tion of the United States was...

    The fol­low­ing are some no­table Amer­i­cans de­clared as Ser­vants of God, ven­er­a­bles, be­at­i­fied, and can­on­ized saints: Servants of God Venerables 1. 1.1. Nelson Baker 1.2. Cornelia Connelly 1.3. Henriette DeLille 1.4. Samuel Charles Mazzuchelli 1.5. Michael J. McGivney 1.6. Patrick Peyton 1.7. Fulton J. Sheen 1.8. Pierre Toussaint 1.9. Aloysius Schwartz Beatified 1. 1.1. Teresa Demjanovich 1.2. Carlos Manuel Rodriguez 1.3. Stanley Rother 1.4. Francis Xavier Seelos 1.5. Solanus Casey Saints

    Ac­cord­ing to The Of­fi­cial Catholic Directory, the fol­low­ing are the top eight Catholic pil­grim­age sites in the United States: 1. National Shrine of the North American Martyrs(Auriesville, New York) 2. Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary(Baltimore, Maryland) 3. El Santuario de Chimayo(Chimayo, New Mexico; north of Santa Fe) 4. Basilica of the National Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton(Emmitsburg, Maryland) 5. Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacramentof Our Lady of the Angels (Hanceville, Alabama) 6. Basilica of Our Lady of Victory(Lackawanna, New York) 7. National Shrine of Saint John Neumann(in St. Peter the Apostle Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) 8. Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception(Washington, D.C.)

    Abell, Aaron. American Catholicism and Social Action: A Search for Social Justice, 1865–1950(Garden City, NY: Hanover House, 1960).
    Bales, Susan Ridgley. When I Was a Child: Children's Interpretations of First Communion(Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 2005).
    Carroll, Michael P. American Catholics in the Protestant Imagination: Rethinking the Academic Study of Religion(Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007).
    Coburn, Carol K. and Martha Smith. Spirited Lives: How Nuns Shaped Catholic Culture and American Life, 1836–1920 (1999) pp 129–58 excerpt and text search
  7. EPIPHANY OF OUR LORD BYZANTINE CATHOLIC MISSION - Church Angel

    www.churchangel.com/directory/listing/epiphany...

    Maryland, we are a church of the Byzantine Rite in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church and other Eastern Catholic Churches. Sunday Divine Liturgy in English is prayed at 10 a.m. and followed by a social hour and religious education. Please visit our website to learn more.

  8. The Eastern Catholic Churches in America

    www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-religion/1611140/posts

    Apr 07, 2006 · The Eastern Catholic Churches in America Contemporary Review , April, 2004 by Daniel P. Grigassy IF YOU have ever driven through the 'Rust Belt' in the northeastern and north-central United States, that territory dominated by steel mills and coal mines, you are likely to notice, especially near urban areas, the gold or silver domes topped by ...

  9. Eastern Churches in the Western World: Roots, Growth, Future ...

    cnewa.org/magazine/eastern-churches-in-the...

    East meets West at Resurrection Coptic Catholic Church, Brooklyn. Why are there Eastern churches in the West? The dispersion of Eastern Christians to the New World reflects the tragedies of the 20th century – two world wars, the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian, Ottoman, Russian and Soviet empires, economic disparity and Middle East turmoil – and the promises of peace and prosperity in a ...

  10. Ukrainian Catholic Archeparchy of Philadelphia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukrainian_Catholic...

    The Archeparchy's territorial jurisdiction includes the District of Columbia, Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, and the eastern and central portions of Pennsylvania. Ukrainian Catholics in the United States were given sui iuris status as an ordinariate for the faithful of eastern rite by Pope Pius X in 1914.

  11. Homosexual "Marriage" Bill Dies in Maryland Legislature - The ...

    thenewamerican.com/homosexual-marriage-bill-dies...

    A bill in Maryland that would legalize homosexual marriage appears to be dead for the year, killed in part by efforts from African-American churches committed to defending traditional marriage and ...