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    • History of Orthodox Christianity

      • Distinctive Orthodox Beliefs. Eastern Orthodoxy arose as a distinct branch of Christianity after the 11th-century "Great Schism" between Eastern and Western Christendom.
      • Organization and Religious Authority. ...
      • Orthodox Worship and Religious Practices. ...
      religionfacts.com/eastern-orthodoxy
  1. People also ask

    Is Eastern Orthodox the real Christianity?

    Is Eastern Orthodoxy a part of the true church?

    What are the beliefs of the Eastern Orthodox?

    Who are Eastern Orthodox Christians and what do they believe?

  2. Eastern Orthodox Church Beliefs and Practices - Learn Religions

    www.learnreligions.com › eastern-orthodox-church
    • Eastern Orthodox Beliefs vs. Roman Catholic
    • Eastern Orthodoxy vs. Protestantism
    • Eastern Orthodox Beliefs vs. Western Christianity
    • Eastern Orthodox Church Beliefs
    • Sources

    The primary dispute that led to the split between Eastern Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicismcentered around Rome's deviation from the original conclusions of the seven ecumenical councils, such as the claim to a universal papal supremacy. Another particular conflict is known as the Filioque Controversy. The Latin word filioque means "and from the Son." It had been inserted into the Nicene Creed during the 6th century, thus changing the phrase pertaining to the origin of the Holy Spiritfrom "who proceeds from the Father" to "who proceeds from the Father and the Son." It had been added to emphasize Christ's divinity, but Eastern Christians not only objected to the altering of anything produced by the first ecumenical councils, but they also disagreed with its new meaning. Eastern Christians believe both the Spirit and the Son have their origin in the Father.

    A clear distinction between Eastern Orthodoxy and Protestantism is the concept of "Sola Scriptura." This "Scripture alone" doctrine held by Protestant faiths asserts that the Word of God can be clearly understood and interpreted by the individual believer and is sufficient on its own to be the final authority in Christian doctrine. Orthodoxy argues that the Holy Scriptures (as interpreted and defined by church teachings in the first seven ecumenical councils) along with Holy Tradition are of equal value and importance.

    A less apparent distinction between Eastern Orthodoxy and Western Christianity is their differing theological approaches, which is, perhaps, merely the result of cultural influences. The Eastern mindset is inclined toward philosophy, mysticism, and ideology, whereas the Western outlook is guided more by a practical and legal mentality. This can be seen in the subtly different ways that Eastern and Western Christians approach spiritual truth. Orthodox Christians believe that truth must be personally experienced and, as a result, they place less emphasis on its precise definition. Worship is the center of church life in Eastern Orthodoxy. It is highly liturgical, embracing seven sacraments and characterized by a priestly and mystical nature. Veneration of icons and a mystical form of meditative prayer are commonly incorporated into religious rituals.

    Authority of Scripture: The Holy Scriptures (as interpreted and defined by church teaching in the first seven ecumenical councils) along with Holy Tradition are of equal value and importance.
    Baptism: Baptismis the initiator of the salvation experience. Eastern Orthodox practice baptism by full immersion.
    Eucharist: The Eucharist is the center of worship. Eastern Orthodoxbelieve that during the Eucharist adherents partake mystically of Christ's body and blood and through it receive his life and stre...
    Holy Spirit: The Holy Spirit is one of the persons of the Trinity, who proceeds from the Father and is one in essence with the Father. The Holy Spirit is given by Christ as a gift to the church, to...
    The Orthodox Page in America
    Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America
  3. Eastern Orthodox Church - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Eastern_Orthodox_Church

    The Eastern Orthodox Church, officially the Orthodox Catholic Church, is the second-largest Christian church, with approximately 220 million baptised members. It operates as a communion of autocephalous churches, each governed by its bishops in local synods.

  4. What Is the Eastern Orthodox Denomination? - Learn Religions

    www.learnreligions.com › eastern-orthodox-church
    • Number of Eastern Orthodox Christians Worldwide
    • Eastern Orthodox Founding
    • Prominent Eastern Orthodox Founders
    • Geography
    • Eastern Orthodox Governing Body
    • Sacred Or Distinguishing Text
    • Notable Eastern Orthodox Christians
    • Eastern Orthodox Church Beliefs and Practices

    An estimated 200 million Christians are part of the Eastern Orthodox denomination today, making it the second-largest religion worldwide. Orthodox Churches form a theologically united family of 13 autonomous bodies, denoted by their nation of origin. The umbrella of Eastern Orthodoxy includes the following: British Orthodox; Serbian Orthodox; Orthodox Church of Finland; Russian Orthodox; Syrian Orthodox; Ukrainian Orthodox; Bulgarian Orthodox; Romanian Orthodox; Antiochian Orthodox; Greek Orthodox; the Church of Alexandria; the Church of Jerusalem; and the Orthodox Church in America.

    The Eastern Orthodox denomination is one of the oldest religious establishments in the world. Until 1054 AD Eastern Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicismwere branches of the same body—the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. Before this time, divisions between the two branches of Christendom had long existed and were constantly increasing. The widening schism was caused by a mix of cultural, political, and religious differences. In 1054 AD a formal split occurred when Pope Leo IX(head of the Roman branch) excommunicated the Patriarch of Constantinople, Michael Cerularius (leader of the Eastern branch), who in turn condemned the pope in mutual excommunication. The churches have remained divided and separate to the present date.

    Michael Cerularius was the patriarch of Constantinople from 1043 -1058 AD, during Eastern Orthodoxy's formal separation from the Roman Catholic Church. He played a prominent role in the circumstances surrounding the Great East-West Schism. For more about Eastern Orthodox History visit Eastern Orthodox Church - Brief History.

    The majority of Eastern Orthodox Christians reside in Eastern Europe, Russia, the Middle East, and the Balkans.

    The Eastern Orthodox denomination consists of a fellowship of self-governing churches (governed by their own head bishops), with the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople holding the honorary title of first in order. The Patriarch does not exercise the same authority as the Catholic Pope. Orthodox churches claim to exist as a theologically unified communion of churches with the Scriptures, as interpreted by the seven ecumenical councils, as their sole authority and Jesus Christas the head of the church.

    The Holy Scriptures (including the Apocrypha) as interpreted by the first seven ecumenical councils of the church are the primary sacred texts. Eastern Orthodoxy also places special importance on the works of early Greek fathers such as Basil the Great, Gregory of Nyssa, and John Chrysostom, who were all canonized as saintsof the church.

    Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople (born Demetrios Archondonis), Cyril Lucaris, Leonty Filippovich Magnitsky, George Stephanopoulos, Michael Dukakis, Tom Hanks.

    The word orthodox means "right believing" and was traditionally used to signify the true religion that faithfully followed the beliefs and practices defined by the first seven ecumenical councils (dating back to the first 10 centuries). Orthodox Christianity claims to have fully preserved the traditions and doctrines of the original Christian church established by the apostles. Orthodox believers adhere to the doctrines of the Trinity, the Bible as the Word of God, Jesus as the Son of God and God the Son, and many other core doctrines of Christianity. They depart from Protestant doctrine in the areas of justification by faith alone, the Bible as the sole authority, the perpetual virginity of Mary, and few other doctrines. For more about what Eastern Orthodox Christians believe visit Eastern Orthodox Church - Beliefs and Practices. (Sources: ReligiousTolerance.org, ReligionFacts.com, Orthodox Christian Information Center, and Way of Life.org.)

  5. How Is Eastern Orthodoxy Different? | Answers in Genesis

    answersingenesis.org › world-religions › eastern

    Apr 12, 2017 · Like Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy places great emphasis on the “sacraments.” Like Catholicism, Orthodoxy sees baptism as bringing about the regeneration of the person receiving the sacrament. The Orthodox typically baptize infants, but, of course, adult converts to Orthodoxy are baptized as well.

  6. Eastern Orthodox Church - ReligionFacts

    religionfacts.com › eastern-orthodox
    • Distinctive Orthodox Beliefs
    • Organization and Religious Authority
    • Orthodox Worship and Religious Practices

    Eastern Orthodoxy arose as a distinct branch of Christianity after the 11th-century "Great Schism" between Eastern and Western Christendom. The separation was not sudden. For centuries there had been significant religious, cultural, and political differences between the Eastern and Western churches. As in all of Christianity, doctrine is important in Eastern Orthodoxy. Orthodox Christians attach great importance to the Bible, the conclusions of the Seven Ecumenical Councils, and right ("orthodox") belief. However, the Eastern Churches approach religious truth differently than the Western Churches. For Orthodox Christians, truth must be experienced personally. There is less focus on the exact definition of religious truth and more on the practical and personal experience of truth in the life of the individual and the church. Precise theological definition, when it occurs, is for the purpose of excluding error. This emphasis on personal experience of truth flows into Orthodox theology...

    The Orthodox Church is organized into several regional, autocephalous (governed by their own head bishops) churches. The Patriarch of Constantinople has the honor of primacy, but does not carry the same authority as the Pope does in Catholicism. Major Orthodox churches include the Greek Orthodox Church, the Russian Orthodox Church, the Romanian Orthodox Church, the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, the Church of Alexandria, the Church of Jerusalem, and the Orthodox Church in America. The religious authority for Orthodox Christianity is not the Pope as in Catholicism, nor the individual Christian with his Bible as in Protestantism, but the scriptures as interpreted by the seven ecumenical councils of the church. Orthodoxy also relies heavily on the writings of early Greek fathers such as Gregory of Nyssa, John Chrysostom and St. Basil the Great. Although some Orthodox confessions of faith were produced in the 17th century as counterparts to those of the Reformation, these are regarded as ha...

    Orthodox worship is highly liturgical and is central to the history and life of the church: By its theological richness, spiritual significance, and variety, the worship of the Orthodox Church represents one of the most significant factors in this church's continuity and identity. It helps to account for the survival of Christianity during the many centuries of Muslim rule in the Middle East and the Balkans when the liturgy was the only source of religious knowledge or experience. {1} References and Sources

    • January 29, 2021
    • Eastern Orthodox Church
    • March 17, 2015
    • religionfacts.com/ eastern-orthodoxy
  7. Eastern Orthodox Church History - Learn Religions

    www.learnreligions.com › eastern-orthodox-church
    • Origin of Eastern Orthodoxy
    • The Widening Gap
    • The Formal Split
    • Founding Patriarch of Constantinople
    • Signs of Hope For Reconciliation Today
    • Sources

    All Christian denominations are rooted in the life and ministry of Jesus Christ and share the same origins. Early believers were part of one body, one church. However, during the ten centuries following the resurrection, the church experienced many disagreements and fractions. Eastern Orthodoxyand Roman Catholicism were the results of these early schisms.

    Disagreement between these two branches of Christendom had already long existed, but the gap between the Roman and Eastern churches increased throughout the first millennium with a progression of worsening disputes. On religious matters, the two branches disagreed over issues pertaining to the nature of the Holy Spirit, the use of icons in worship and the correct date for celebrating Easter. Cultural differences played a major role too, with the Eastern mindset more inclined toward philosophy, mysticism, and ideology, and the Western outlook guided more by a practical and legal mentality. This slow process of separation was encouraged in 330 AD when Emperor Constantine decided to move the capital of the Roman Empire to the city of Byzantium (Byzantine Empire, modern-day Turkey) and called it Constantinople. When he died, his two sons divided their rule, one taking the Eastern portion of the empire and ruling from Constantinople and the other taking the western portion, ruling from R...

    In 1054 AD a formal split occurred when Pope Leo IX (leader of the Roman branch) excommunicated the Patriarch of Constantinople, Michael Cerularius (leader of the Eastern branch), who in turn condemned the pope in mutual excommunication. Two primary disputes at the time were Rome's claim to a universal papal supremacy and the adding of the filioque to the Nicene Creed. This particular conflict is also known as the Filioque Controversy. The Latin word filioque means "and from the Son." It had been inserted into the Nicene Creed during the 6th century, thus changing the phrase about the origin of the Holy Spiritfrom "who proceeds from the Father" to "who proceeds from the Father and the Son." It had been added to emphasize Christ's divinity, but Eastern Christians not only objected to the altering of anything produced by the first ecumenical councils, they disagreed with its new meaning. Eastern Christians believe both the Spirit and the Son have their origin in the Father.

    Michael Cerularius was the Patriarch of Constantinople from 1043 -1058 AD, during Eastern Orthodoxy's formal separation from the Roman Catholic Church. He played a prominent role in the circumstances surrounding the Great East-West Schism. During the time of the Crusades (1095), Rome joined with the East to defend the Holy Land against the Turks, providing a ray of hope for a possible reconciliation between the two churches. But by the end of the Fourth Crusade (1204), and the Sack of Constantinople by the Romans, all hope ended as the degree of hostility been the two churches continued to worsen.

    To the present date, the Eastern and Western churches remain divided and separate. However, since 1964, an important process of dialogue and cooperation has begun. In 1965, Pope Paul VI and Patriarch Athenagoras agreed to formally remove the mutual excommunication of 1054. More hope for reconciliation came when Pope John Paul II visited Greece in 2001, the first papal visit to Greece in a thousand years. And in 2004, the Roman Catholic Church returned the relics of St. John Chrysostom to Constantinople. These antiquities were originally pillaged in 1204 by Crusaders.

    ReligiousTolerance.org ReligionFacts.com Patheos.com Orthodox Christian Information Center WayofLife.org

  8. Eastern Orthodoxy by country - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Eastern_Orthodoxy_by_country

    Eastern Orthodoxy is the predominant religion in the world's largest country, Russia (77%), where roughly half the world's Eastern Orthodox Christians live.

  9. I Am Eastern Orthodox (Religions of the World): Sevastiades ...

    www.amazon.com › Am-Eastern-Orthodox-Religions

    Gr 1-4--Basic information from the perspective of young people who are members of the worldwide spiritual communities represented in the series. All of these children have a strong commitment to their religion. Ahmet is a Muslim living in Detroit. Anastasia is Eastern Orthodox. Her brother is the priest of her church in Chicago.

    • (1)
    • Library Binding
    • Philemon D. Sevastiades
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