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  1. Tübingen - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tubingen

    Tübingen is the capital of an eponymous district and an eponymous administrative region (Regierungsbezirk), before 1973 called Südwürttemberg-Hohenzollern. Tübingen is, with nearby Reutlingen (about 15 km (9.3 mi) east), one of the two centre cities of the Neckar-Alb region.

  2. House of Habsburg - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Habsburg_Dynasty

    This family tree only includes male scions of the House of Habsburg from 920 to 1308. Otto II was probably the first to take the Habsburg Castle name as his own, adding "von Habsburg" to his title and creating the House of Habsburg. See below for more references.

  3. Sigmaringen Castle - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schloss_Sigmaringen

    Finally in 1399 Count Eberhard von Württemberg granted the castle and county of Sigmaringensein as well as the county of Veringen in Margraviate of Austria, to his uncle and liegeman Count Eberhard III. von Werdenberg (1387–1416) as a fief.

  4. Wenceslaus IV of Bohemia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wenceslaus_IV_of_Bohemia

    Indeed, on 4 July 1376, fourteen Swabian cities bound together into the independent Swabian League of Cities to defend their rights against the newly elected King, attacking the lands of Eberhard II, Count of Württemberg. The city league soon attracted other members and until 1389 acted as an autonomous state within the Empire.

  5. Sigmaringen Castle | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org/wiki/Sigmaringen_Castle

    Finally in 1399 Count Eberhard von Württemberg granted the castle and county of Sigmaringensein as well as the county of Veringen in Margraviate of Austria, to his uncle and liegeman Count Eberhard III. von Werdenberg (1387–1416) as a fief.

  6. Tübingen | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/Tübingen

    In 1342, the county palatine was sold to Ulrich III, Count of Württemberg and incorporated into the County of Württemberg and has since been part of the Duchy of Württemberg (1495–1806), the Kingdom of Württemberg (1806–1918), the Free People's State of Württemberg (1918–1945) and Baden-Württemberg (since 1952).

  7. Montbéliard castle in Montbeliard, France - Virtual Globetrotting

    virtualglobetrotting.com/map/montb-liard-castle

    Until 1397, the castle belonged to the Montfaucon family. The marriage of Henriette d'Orbe to Eberhard IV, son of the count Eberhard III of Württemberg, transferred the ownership of the castle to the Württemberg family. In 1793, the castle became part of Revolutionary France.

  8. Tübingen Explained

    everything.explained.today/Tübingen

    The latter existed until Duke Ulrich of Würtemmberg disestablished it in 1535 in course of the Protestant Reformation, which the Duchy of Württemberg followed. In 1300, a Latin school (today's Uhland-Gymnasium) was founded. In 1342, the county palatine was sold to Ulrich III, Count of Württemberg and incorporated into the County of Württemberg.

  9. Geography - db0nus869y26v.cloudfront.net

    db0nus869y26v.cloudfront.net/en/Tübingen

    In 1342, the county palatine was sold to Ulrich III, Count of Württemberg and incorporated into the County of Württemberg and has since been part of the Duchy of Württemberg (1495–1806), the Kingdom of Württemberg (1806–1918), the Free People's State of Württemberg (1918–1945) and Baden-Württemberg (since 1952).

  10. List of coupled cousins - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_coupled_cousins

    List of coupled cousins. Language; ... (daughter of Eberhard III, Duke of Württemberg) 8 February 1671 ... Count of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rochefort and Countess Anna ...