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  1. Eleanor, Countess of Ponthieu. Edward II (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327), also called Edward of Caernarfon, was King of England and Lord of Ireland from 1307 until he was deposed in January 1327. The fourth son of Edward I, Edward became the heir apparent to the throne following the death of his elder brother Alphonso.

  2. Apr 21, 2022 · Edward II, byname Edward of Caernarvon, (born April 25, 1284, Caernarvon, Caernarvonshire, Wales—died September 1327, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England), king of England from 1307 to 1327. Although he was a man of limited capability, he waged a long, hopeless campaign to assert his authority over powerful barons.

    • Personal Qualities
    • Scotland
    • A Divided England
    • Civil War & Abdication
    • Death & Successor

    Edward was born on 25 April 1284 CE at Caernarfon Castle in Wales, the son of Edward I of England and Eleanor of Castile (b. c. 1242 CE). The prince was athletic, intelligent and keen on the arts but was prone, like most of his Plantagenet ancestors, to a violent and stubborn temper. Another peculiarity was Edward's passion for manual labour and sk...

    Edward I had conquered Wales and had been seemingly intent on adding Scotland to his kingdom but his death while on campaign in July 1307 CE gave the Scots a much-needed reprieve. Robert the Brucehad made himself king in February 1306 CE with the support of the Scottish northern barons, and the country was very far from giving up its independence d...

    Leaving foreign affairs to look after themselves, Edward II mostly spent his time with his pleasure-seeking friends amongst the comforts and attractions of London. One of these associates was Piers Gaveston (aka Peter de Gabaston) who had, despite his humble origins as the son of a mere knight, been made the Earl of Cornwall. Edward may have had a ...

    Edward's kingdom became split into two groups: those for and those in opposition to their ineffectual king. The former were led by Hugh le Despenser, who had replaced Gaveston as the king's favourite (and probably lover), and the latter by Lancaster. The division even led to all-out warfare with the royalists defeating a rebel army at the Battle of...

    Edward II, aged just 43, was murdered on 21 September 1327 CE at what had become his prison, the castle keep of Berkeley Castle. The orders for the execution likely came directly from his wife Isabella and her consort Roger Mortimer who quickly tired of the rumours and plots by the old king's supporters to restore him to his throne. Wishing to make...

    • Mark Cartwright
    • Publishing Director
  3. Edward II of England Edward II (April 25, 1284–1327) of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until he was removed from the throne in January 1327. His tendency to ignore his nobility, in favour of low-born favorites, led to political trouble and eventually to his removal from the throne.

    • 25 February 1308
    • Edward I
    • 8 July 1307 – 20 January 1327
    • Edward III
    • King of England
    • War with The Barons
    • Conflict with Scotland
    • "Rule" of The Despensers
    • Abdication
    • Death
    • Fictional Accounts of Edward II
    • Legacy
    • References

    Edward was as physically impressive as his father, yet he lacked the drive and ambition of his forebear. It was written that Edward II was "the first king after the Conquest who was not a man of business".His main interest was in entertainment, though he also took pleasure in athletics and mechanical crafts. He had been so dominated by his father t...

    When Edward traveled to the northern French city of Boulogne-sur-Mer to marry Isabella, he left his friend and counselor Gaveston to act as regent. Gaveston also received the earldom of Cornwall and the hand of the king's niece, Margaret of Gloucester. But these proved to be costly honors. Various barons grew resentful of Gaveston, and insisted on ...

    During this period, Robert the Bruce was steadily re-conquering Scotland. In June 1314, Edward led a huge army into Scotland in hopes of relieving Stirling. On June 24, his ill-disciplined and poorly-led force was completely defeated by Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn. Contemporary chroniclers considered it one of the worst defeats sustained by ...

    Following the death of Gaveston, the King increased favor to his nephew-by-marriage (who was also Gaveston's brother-in-law), Hugh Despenser the Younger. But, as with Gaveston, the Barons were indignant at the privileges Edward lavished upon the Despenser father and son, especially when the younger Despenser began in 1318, to strive to procure for ...

    With the King imprisoned, Mortimer and the Queen faced the problem of what to do with him. The simplest solution would be execution: his titles would then pass to Edward of Windsor, whom Isabella could control, whilst it would also prevent the possibility of his being restored. Execution would require the King to be tried and convicted of Treason: ...

    The government of Isabella and Mortimer was so precarious that they dared not leave the deposed king in the hands of their political enemies. On April 3, Edward II was removed from Kenilworth and entrusted to the custody of two dependents of Mortimer, then later imprisoned at Berkeley Castle in Gloucestershire where, it is generally believed, he wa...

    The most famous fictional account of Edward II's reign is Christopher Marlowe's play Edward II. In recent years, several acclaimed productions have been staged in the United Kingdom, although the play is seldom performed in the United States outside of large cities and university towns. Derek Jarman's cinematic version of the play has much more to ...

    While mainly remembered as a failure with respect to his ability to govern the country, for his defeat by Robert the Bruce, and death at the hands of rebels, Edwards's support for scholarship by founding Oriel College, Oxford and King's Hall, Cambridge represents an enduringly valuable contribution to learning and to the academy. He was king at a t...

    Blackley, F. D., and Gustav Hermansen. The Household Book of Queen Isabella of England, for the Fifth Regnal Year of Edward II, 8th July 1311 to 7th July 1312. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press...
    Doherty, Paul. Isabella and the Strange Death of Edward II. London: Constable and Robinson, 2003. ISBN 1-84119-301-1.
    Fryde, Natalie. The Tyranny and Fall of Edward II: 1321-1326. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1979. ISBN 9780521222013.
    Haines, Roy Martin. King Edward II: Edward of Caernarfon His Life, His Reign, and Its Aftermath 1284-1330. Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2006. ISBN 978-0773531574.
  4. 25 Apr 1284 Edward II of England is born in Caernarfon Castle in Wales. 1301 Prince Edward, son of Edward I of England, is formally awarded the title of Prince of Wales. 1307 - 1327 Reign of Edward II of England . 7 Jul 1307 Death of Edward I of England from dysentery. 25 Jan 1308 Edward II of England marries Isabella of France. 25 Feb 1308

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