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  1. It must be remembered that at this point, Richard III and his cronies were putting it about that Edward IV was a bastard, in order to bolster his younger brother’s claim for the throne. It is likely therefore that this rumour crops up for the first time in 1483 and probably didn’t spring from Cecily’s lips.

  2. King Edward IV, whom Tony Robinson believes was illegitimate. You may or may not have seen Tony Robinson’s 2004 documentary Britain’s Real Monarch, in which he proposes that King Edward IV of England (1442-1483), who reigned from 1461 until 1470, and again from 1471 until his death, was illegitimate, therefore had no claim to the throne, and that all subsequent monarchs – as his ...

  3. Arthur, Viscount Lisle ( ill.) Edward IV (28 April 1442 – 9 April 1483) was King of England from 4 March 1461 to 3 October 1470, [1] [2] then again from 11 April 1471 until his death in 1483. He was a central figure in the Wars of the Roses, a series of civil wars in England fought between the Yorkist and Lancastrian factions between 1455 and ...

  4. It must be remembered that at this point, Richard III and his cronies were putting it about that Edward IV was a bastard, in order to bolster his younger brother’s claim for the throne. It is likely therefore that this rumour crops up for the first time in 1483 and probably didn’t spring from Cecily’s lips.

  5. Lately it has been his eldest brother, Edward IV, born 28 April 1442, who has come in for scrutiny and a claim that he was indeed illegitimate. So what is the claim and how does that bear up under scrutiny? The claim, and historical evidence

  6. The traditional story of Edward IV’s private life asserts not only that he had mistresses, but also that he produced heaps of illegitimate children. However, that too proves to be untrue. The king is recorded as only acknowledging one illegitimate child during his reign. It was a boy, but his name is unknown.

  7. Amateur but enthusiastic student of history. Author has 11.8K answers and 16.4M answer views Updated 1 y. There is no hard evidence that Edward IV was illegitimate, and accusations of illegitimacy were commonly made during dynastic struggles as a way of disqualifying rivals. Claims of Edward’s illegitimacy are based on two facts: Edward was unusually tall and well-built for his era and bore no resemblance to his official father, the Duke York; and, nine months before Edward’s birth York ...

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