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  1. Musical borrowing in the early modern period has been widely investigated, with papers on the subject by scholars ranging from Franklin Zimmerman to Stephen Rose. However, only limited attention has been given to the fact that a great deal of musical

  2. Lucas Cranach the Elder, who lived in sixteenth-century Germany, was court painter to Friedrich the Wise, Elector of Saxony, and friend of Martin Luther. Among Cranach’s works, which include paintings of biblical subjects and austere portraits of princes and Protestant reformers, are representations of stories from Greek myth, among them a ...

  3. On 11 March he gave a concert in Prague; on 29 April he played before the Elector of Saxony in Dresden. On reaching Berlin, he appeared several times before the King of Prussia (Friedrich Wilhelm II), and with the king’s first cellist, Jean Louis Duport, he played the two op.5 cello sonatas, written for this performance.

  4. en.wiktionary.org › wiki › electorelector - Wiktionary

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    Etymology

    From Middle English electour (“one with a right to vote in electing some office, elector”), borrowed from Late Latin ēlēctor (“chooser, selector; voter, elector”), from Latin ēligere (“to elect”) + -tor (suffix forming masculine agent nouns). Ēligere is the present active infinitive of ēligō (“to extract, pluck or root out; (figurative) to choose, elect, pick out”), from ē- (variant of ex- (prefix meaning ‘away; out’)) + legō (“to appoint, choose, select”) (from Proto-Italic *legō (“to gather...

    Pronunciation

    1. (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪˈlɛktə/ 2. (General American) IPA(key): /əˈlɛktɚ/ 3. Rhymes: -ɛktə(ɹ) 4. Hyphenation: elect‧or

    Noun

    elector (plural electors) 1. (politics) A person eligible to vote in an election; a member of an electorate, a voter.quotations ▼ 1.1. 1788, Publius [pseudonym; Alexander Hamilton], “Number XXXV. The Same Subject [the general power of taxation] Continued.”, in The Federalist: A Collection of Essays, Written in Favour of the New Constitution, […], volume I, New York, N.Y.: […] J. and A. M‘Lean,[…], OCLC 642792893, page 217: 1.1.1. Where the qualifications of the electorsare the ſame, whether t...

    Etymology

    From Latin elector.

    Noun

    elector m (plural electors, feminine electora) 1. voter, elector

    Further reading

    1. “elector” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans. 2. “elector” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana. 3. “elector” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua. 4. “elector” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

    Etymology

    From ēligō (“to choose, pick out”) +‎ -tor (agentive suffix) from ex- (“out”) +‎ legō (“to gather, collect”) from Proto-Italic *legō, from Proto-Indo-European *leǵ-. Compare Ancient Greek ἐκλέγω (eklégō).

    Pronunciation

    1. (Classical) IPA(key): /eːˈleːk.tor/, [eːˈɫ̪eːkt̪ɔr] 2. (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /eˈlek.tor/, [ɛˈlɛkt̪ɔr]

    Noun

    ēlēctor m (genitive ēlēctōris, feminine ēlēctrīx); third declension 1. chooser, selector 2. voter, elector

    Etymology

    From French électeur or Latin elector.

    Noun

    elector m (plural electori) 1. elector

    Etymology

    From Late Latin ēlēctor (“chooser, selector”) (genitive singular ēlēctōris), from Latin ēligō (“to choose, pick out”), ex- +‎ legō from Proto-Italic *legō (“to gather, collect”), from Proto-Indo-European *leǵ-.

    Noun

    elector m (plural electores, feminine electora, feminine plural electoras) 1. voter, elector 1.1. Synonym: votante

    Further reading

    1. “elector” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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    A settlement was first mentioned in 1180 as a small village founded by Flemish colonists under the rule of the House of Ascania. In 1260, it became the residence of the dukes of Saxe-Wittenberg, and in 1293 the settlement was granted a town charter. Wittenberg developed into an important trade centre during the following centuries, due to its location. When the Ascanians died out, Saxe-Wittenberg passed to the House of Wettin. The city became an important regional political and cultural centre at the end of the 15th century, when Frederick III "the Wise", Elector of Saxony, took up residence in Wittenberg. Several parts of the city were extended soon afterward: the second bridge over the Elbe was built from 1486 to 1490 and the castle church, the Schlosskirche, was built from 1496 to 1506. The palace was rebuilt the same time. In 1502, the University of Wittenberg was founded and gave a home to many important thinkers, among them Martin Luther (Professor of Theology from 1508) and P...

    Wittenberg is home to numerous important historical artifacts, as well as portraits and other paintings by Lucas Cranach the Elder and Younger. On the doors of All Saints' Church, the Schlosskirche ("castle church" built 1496–1506) Luther nailed his 95 theses in 1517. It was seriously damaged by fire in 1760 during a bombardment by the French during the Seven Years' War, was practically rebuilt, and was later (1885–1892) restored. The wooden doors, burnt in 1760, were replaced in 1858 by bronze doors, bearing the Latin text of the theses. Inside the church are the tombs of Luther and Philipp Melanchthon, and of the electors Frederick the Wise (by Peter Vischer the Younger, 1527) and John the Constant (by Hans Vischer), and portraits of the reformers by Lucas Cranach the Younger. St. Mary's Church, the parish church in which Luther often preached, was built in the 14th century, but has been much altered since Luther's time. It contains a magnificent painting by Lucas Cranach the Elde...

    Wittenberg's civic coat of armsconveys with its various heraldic elements something of the town's history. On 27 June 1293, Wittenberg was granted town rights by Duke Albrecht II. There then arose a mediaeval town whose highest governing body was its council. This council, known to have existed as early as 1317, was given the job of administering the town in its care through law and legislation, and of handling the town's revenue. For documentation, the administration used its own seal. One version of what is believed to be the town's oldest town seal, which the council used, and which dated from the first half of the 14th century, set the pattern with its elements for various civic coats of arms down to the present day. The coat of arms symbolizes, with its crenelated wall and the towers within and each side, a town that was already strongly fortified by 1409. The two shields in the centre form the coat of arms of the Electorate of Saxony with the Saxon arms on the right, whose gol...

    Wittenberg has a long tradition of cultural events. The City Theatre (Mitteldeutsches Landestheater) reached a great importance in GDR times. Since 1996, the City has staged open-air theatre shows based on the Lutheran history still alive in many historical places of the ancient town. As highlights, in 2001 and 2005, Fernando Scarpa became the artistic director of the "Bühne Wittenberg" (Stage Wittenberg), a project for theatre, art and culture in the whole of Germany which attracts to the city plenty of audience and whose success achieves European echo. On 2002 and 2003 Stefano Vagnini, Italian composer and organist created the music for Thesys and Luther Stories. Prince Hamlet is said to have studied in Wittenberg and it was the supposed home of Dr Faustus.

    Wittenberg is twinnedwith: 1. Göttingen, Germany, since 1988 2. Bretten, Germany, since 1990 3. Springfield, Ohio, United States, since 1995 4. Békéscsaba, Hungary, since 1999 5. Haderslev, Denmark, since 2004

    The Augusteum and Lutherhaus
    House of Philipp Melanchthon
  5. Peter Burke Languages and Communities in Early Modern Europe The Wiles Lectures 2004 (1)

  6. dictionary. metternich clemens von 1773 ... prince clemens wenceslaus of saxony the archbishop elector of trier and' ... June 10th, 2018 - Download Pdf Sorry

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