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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ellen_McElduff Cached From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Ellen McElduff (born March 7, 1964) is a Canadian film, television, and stage actress, best known for roles in JFK, Oz, Homicide: Life on the Street, and many acclaimed stage productions.

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ellen_McElduff Cached Ellen McElduff (born March 7, 1964) is a Canadian film, television, and stage actress, best known for roles in JFK, Oz, Homicide: Life on the Street, and many acclaimed stage productions.

  3. Ellen McElduff From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Ellen McElduff (born March 7, 1964) is a Cana­dian film, tele­vi­sion, and stage ac­tress, best known for roles in JFK, Oz, Homi­cide: Life on the Street, and many ac­claimed stage pro­duc­tions.

  4. Ellen McElduff, Actress: Maximum Overdrive. Ellen McElduff was born on March 7, 1964 in Canada. She is an actress, known for Maximum Overdrive (1986), Little Man Tate (1991) and JFK (1991).

    • Etymology
    • Location
    • The Springs
    • History
    • Zen Center

    Tasajera is a Spanish-American word derived from an indigenous Esselen language, which designates a "place where meat is hung to dry." It has also been known as Tassajara Springs, Tesahara Springs and on mining claims as Agua Caliente.

    The hot springs are located 28.3 miles (45.5 km) from Carmel Valley Road. The springs are currently privately owned by the San Francisco Zen Center which operates the Tassajara Zen Mountain Center on site. The last 8.2 miles (13.2 km) of the road into the springs is extremely narrow and steep, so much so that visitors are encouraged to use four-wheel drive vehicles or take a shuttle from Jamesburg, California, where the Zen Center maintains offices. Jamesburg is at the foot of Chews Ridge, 13.8 miles (22.2 km) from the hot springs.

    In 1918, the state mineralogist from the California State Mining Bureauproduced a report detailing the large amount of hot water that issues at Tassajara Hot Springs through about seventeen thermal springs in the bed of the creek and along its southern bank. These range in temperature from about 100 °F (38 °C) to 140 °F (60 °C) and vary from mere seepages to flows of 8 US gallons (30 l) a minute. Thermal waters issue from a gneissexposed along the creek for a distance of 600 feet (180 m) or more. Above and below this exposure the rock is granitic and in some places contains small garnets. The crystalline rocks are overlain by a series of shales, sandstones, and limestones, whose structure in the area north of Arroyo Seco is shown by the beds of massive buff-colored sandstone that dip northeastward at an angle of about 45°. A western limb of this structure has not been recorded but may exist in the mountains further towards the coast. The observed dips at least suggest that Tassajara...

    Esselen

    The springs were first used by native Esselen people who occupied the area for at least a thousand years before the Spanish colonial period. According to some historians and accounts, many of the local Native American people were subjugated by Spanish missionaries in the California Mission system under Father Junípero Serra. These claims are contested by the Diocese of Monterey.By the time of the American Civil War, the Europeans who came upon Tassajara found few traces of the Esselens' earli...

    Europeans

    The springs were discovered by Europeans when a hunter found the springs in 1843. Frank Rust founded the public baths in 1868.:4In 1994, a skeleton was unearthed at Tassajara, and research suggested the individual had died about 150 years ago. In 1863, there was a brief "silver rush" in the Tassajara region. Eighteen mining claims were filed by 135 men ("supposed to contain gold and silver") in the "Agua Caliente Mining District." The first mining claim for the area was recorded during the pe...

    The Horse Pasture

    A section of land 160 acres (65 ha) near the springs was nicknamed The Horse Pasture because the flat meadow was once used by wranglers to pasture livestock when passengers used a stage coach to visit the springs. The land, an inholding within the borders of the Ventana Wilderness, was still owned by the Beck family in 2007. The land is a mixture of chamise-dominated chaparral, mixed oak, Coulter Pine forest, and meadow. The watershed offered obvious recreational opportunities and the potenti...

    The springs and surrounding property are privately owned by the San Francisco Zen Center, which purchased the land from Robert and Anna Beck. The site, now formally known as Zenshinji (Zen Heart-Mind Temple) is used year-round as a training monastery by Zen Center. From Memorial Day to Labor Day each year, SFZC rents the simple monastic accommodations as well as allowing day visitors to use the hot springs.Otherwise, it is used exclusively by the monks for intensive practice following a traditional schedule established in Tang Dynasty China.

    • Discovery and Protection
    • National Park
    • City of Hot Springs
    • Bathing Customs
    • Pay Bathhouses
    • Army and Navy Hospital
    • Disasters
    • Government Free Baths
    • Climate
    • Flora and Fauna

    For many years, this area was visited by chiefs and tribes of numerous indigenous peoples. They called it the "Valley of the Vapors" at the time of Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto's arrival in the area in 1541. He was the first known European to see the springs. Members of many Native American tribes had been gathering in the valley for over 8,000 years to enjoy the healing properties of the thermal springs. Around the 18th century the Caddo settled in the area, followed by the Choctaw, Cherokee, and other tribes from the Southeast across the Mississippi River. There was agreement among the tribes that they would put aside their weapons and partake of the healing waters in peace while in the valley. The Quapaw lived in the Arkansas Riverdelta area and visited the springs. In 1673 Father Marquette and Jolliet explored the area and claimed it for France. The Treaty of Paris 1763 ceded the land back to Spain; however, in 1800 control was returned to France until the Louisiana Purchas...

    By act of Congress in 1921, the site's name was officially changed from the Hot Springs Reservation to the Hot Springs National Park.The government acquired more land, expanding it to more than 900 acres (360 ha), including Hot Springs Mountain, North Mountain, West Mountain, Sugarloaf Mountain and Whittington Lake Park. It later was expanded to 5,000 acres (2,000 ha). The springs are grouped about the base of the Hot Springs Mountain, with a flow of well over a half million gallons a day. The hot water is supplied to the various bathhouses, with resulting income from concession fees going to the U.S. Treasury. The park has miles of roads and trails over the mountains. The park is open throughout the year. The first bathhouses were little more than brush huts and log cabins placed over excavations cut in the rocks to receive hot water that flowed from the springs. Entrepreneurs soon developed more elaborate bathing facilities, featuring wooden troughs delivering water from hillside...

    The city of Hot Springs (incorporated 1851) is governed under State and municipal law. In the 1870s, African Americans in town were concentrated in Happy Valley, north of Hot Springs Mountain. There were churches of various denominations, including Baptist for white and black congregations. The National Park Service exercises no control or supervision over any matters connected with the city. The city starts on the other side of Central Avenue from Bathhouse Row. Its development has extended beyond the narrow valley in which the springs are located, spreading out over the open plain to the south and east. The climate is good throughout the year. The elevation of the city is 600 feet (180 m) above sea level, with surrounding hills rising another 600 feet. In the first half of the 20th century, the city operated primarily as a summer resort, but hotels have now long stayed open during the winter due to many northerly patrons coming to escape the winter cold. During the peak popularity...

    It was believed the waters benefited diseases of the skin and blood, nervous affections, rheumatism and kindred diseases, and the "various diseases of women". In the case of tuberculosisand lung diseases, and acute and inflammatory diseases, the use of the waters was considered injurious and in many cases very dangerous. The earliest bathing procedure consisted of merely reclining in natural pools of hot springs and cool creek water for long periods of time. During the 1820s crude vapor baths stood over the springs, and bathers breathed in the vapors for extended periods of time. Wooden tubs were added to some bathhouses in the 1830s. Physicians began arriving in the 1850s, although many visitors did without their services; visitors remained from one week to two months. After the Civil War a tub bath of 15 to 20 minutes was common. During the 1870s the bathing regimen became more diverse, and physicians prescribed various types of baths for patients. The period of time for tub baths...

    There have been nearly two dozen pay bathhouses operating at the same time, with about nine of those within the park's "Bathhouse Row." (Facilities have been reworked over the years, and the Quapaw operate a bath incorporating two previously separate bathhouses). Nine of the bathhouses were associated with hotels, hospitals, or sanatoria. The water is the same for all, but the prices charged for the baths have varied according to the equipment, accommodations and services offered by each facility. The charges for the services of the attendants are the same and include the necessities except towels, blankets, bathrobes, laundering, rubbing mercury, and handling of invalids. The area was popular with baseball players in the early 20th century, and was used by some teams for spring training. In 1929, prices for single baths ranged from $1 to $1.40, while a course of 21 baths was $16 to $24. Facilities were segregated until civil rights legislation in the 1960s. Baths were offered for w...

    The Army and Navy General Hospital (now the Rehabilitation Center) was also supplied with water from the springs. It is located behind the south end of Bathhouse Row along the base of Hot Springs Mountain. It was administered by the War Department for the benefit of military members, officers of the Public Health Service, and honorably discharged veterans. The waters of the hot springs had an established reputation in benefiting. Admission to the hospital was reserved for cases "of a serious and obstinate character, which, though resisting ordinary methods of relief, were promised a rapid and permanent recovery from the use of the waters of the spring." The facility now known as the Hot Springs Rehabilitation Center was built in 1933 as the second Army-Navy hospital. It has been used and operated by the state for over 50 years. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    In November 1864 during the American Civil War, a large part of "the valley" (the central portion of the city along Hot Springs Creek) was burned - presumably by Union troops. As in many other cities, fire has been a risk, especially before city services were developed. On March 5, 1878 a large fire burned for eight hours in the city, claiming nearly 150 buildings, including hotels, bath houses, and restaurants. On February 26, 1905, a fire started in the Grand Central Hotel on Chapel Street and burned 25 blocks of the southern section of Hot Springs. On September 5, 1913, a laundry worker was ironing and accidentally started a fire at 424 Church Street, which spread rapidly due to strong winds and burned nearly 60 blocks of the south part of the city. The city has also been subject to flooding because of the narrow valley. On May 14, 1923, a severe rainstorm hit the city. With mountains surrounding three sides of the city, water flooded down the slopes of the mountains, funneling t...

    Congress established a free bathhouse for the indigent here on December 16, 1878. The Ral Hole mudpit and pool were closed, and the first Government Free Bathhouse operated at the site. The Government free bathhouse was a concrete building fully equipped for bathing large numbers of people under sanitary conditions. In 1878 the Army and Navy opened a free dispensary on the second floor, which remained open for two years. In 1916 the Public Health Service opened a clinic for the examination and treatment of indigents taking the free baths. 100,000 baths a year were given to the poor.[citation needed] Applicants for free baths were required to make an oath that they were without and unable to obtain means to pay for the baths, with violations being a misdemeanor subject to fine and/or imprisonment. Tickets were issued to those who, after examination, were found to be suffering from diseases which were reasonably expected to be benefited from the baths.[citation needed] During the 1880...

    According to the Köppen climate classification system, Hot Springs National Park has a Humid subtropical climate (Cfa). According to the United States Department of Agriculture, the Plant Hardiness zoneat Hot Springs National Park Visitor Center at 627 ft (191 m) elevation is 7b with an average annual extreme minimum temperature of 9.5 °F (-12.5 °C).

    According to the A. W. Kuchler U.S. Potential natural vegetation Types, Hot Springs has an Oak/Hickory/Pine (111) potential vegetation type and a Southern Mixed forest (26) potential vegetation form. The area is primarily forest. The northern slopes of the ridges and basins provide a suitable habitat for deciduous forest dominated by oak and hickory. Pines predominate on the south sides of the ridges. There are 230 acres (93 ha) of unlogged pine and oak forests on North and Hot Springs Mountains, and 90 acres (36 ha) on Sugarloaf Mountain. These old-growth forests contain shortleaf pine, blackjack oak, and white oak; many of the trees over 130 years old, and a few over 200 years old. Plains bison, elk, cougar and red wolf left the region after European settlement. Present day fauna include white tail deer, wild turkey, squirrel, rabbit, Virginia opossum, gray fox, coyote, skunk, raccoon, gopher, long-tailed weasel, mink, rat, chipmunk, frog, and nine-banded armadillo. Some migratory...

  5. Ellen Weber was born on 05/05/1932 and is 89 years old. Ellen Weber lives in Hot Springs Village, AR; previous city include Barrington IL. Ellen also answers to Ellen M Weber, and perhaps a couple of other names. Ellen's ethnicity is unknown, whose political affiliation is currently a registered Republican; and religious views are listed as ...

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