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  1. The alphabet for Modern English is a Latin-script alphabet consisting of 26 letters, each having an upper- and lower-case form. The word alphabet is a compound of the first two letters of the Greek alphabet, alpha and beta.

  2. The Greek alphabet has been used to write the Greek language since the late 9th or early 8th century BCE. [3] [4] It is derived from the earlier Phoenician alphabet , [5] and was the earliest known alphabetic script to have distinct letters for vowels as well as consonants .

  3. Phonemes. A phoneme of a language or dialect is an abstraction of a speech sound or of a group of different sounds which are all perceived to have the same function by speakers of that particular language or dialect.

  4. The modern Greek alphabet has 24 letters. It is used to write the Greek language. The Greek alphabet is also frequently used in science and mathematics to represent various values or variables. Most letters in the Greek alphabet have an equivalent in the English language. The twenty-four letters (each in uppercase and lowercase forms) are:

  5. The Old English Latin alphabet generally consisted of about 26 letters, and was used for writing Old English from the 8th to the 12th centuries. Of these letters, most were directly adopted from the Latin alphabet, two were modified Latin letters (Æ, Ð), and two developed from the runic alphabet (Ƿ, Þ).

  6. In cryptography, a Caesar cipher, also known as Caesar's cipher, the shift cipher, Caesar's code or Caesar shift, is one of the simplest and most widely known encryption techniques. It is a type of substitution cipher in which each letter in the plaintext is replaced by a letter some fixed number of positions down the alphabet .

  7. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › JJ - Wikipedia

    J, or j, is the tenth letter in the Latin alphabet, used in the modern English alphabet, the alphabets of other western European languages and others worldwide.Its usual name in English is jay (pronounced / ˈ dʒ eɪ /), with a now-uncommon variant jy / ˈ dʒ aɪ /.

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