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  1. Euphorbiaceae - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphorbiaceae

    The Euphorbiaceae are a large family, the spurge family, of flowering plants. In common English, they are sometimes called euphorbias, which is also the name of a genus in the family. Most spurges such as Euphorbia paralias are herbs, but some, especially in the tropics, are shrubs or trees, such as Hevea brasiliensis. Some, such as Euphorbia canariensis, are succulent and resemble cacti because of convergent evolution. This family occurs mainly in the tropics, with the majority of the species i

  2. List of Euphorbiaceae genera - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxonomy_of_the_Euphorbiaceae

    Here is a full taxonomy of the family Euphorbiaceae, according to the most recent molecular research. This complex family previously comprising 5 subfamilies: the Acalyphoideae, the Crotonoideae, the Euphorbioideae, the Phyllanthoideae and the Oldfieldioideae. The 3 first ones are uni-ovulate families while the 2 last one are bi-ovulate. Now the Euphorbiaceae has been split into 5 families: The 3 uni-ovulate subfamilies have become the Euphorbiaceae in the strict sense, with the tribe Galearieae

  3. Euphorbia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphorbia

    Euphorbia is a very large and diverse genus of flowering plants, commonly called spurge, in the spurge family. "Euphorbia" is sometimes used in ordinary English to collectively refer to all members of Euphorbiaceae, not just to members of the genus. Some euphorbias are commercially widely available, such as poinsettias at Christmas. Some are commonly cultivated as ornamentals, or collected and highly valued for the aesthetic appearance of their unique floral structures, such as the crown of thor

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  5. From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Spurge family (Euphorbiaceae) is a large family of flowering plants with 300 genera and around 7,500 species. Most are herbs, but some, especially in the tropics, are also shrubs or trees. The name Spurge comes from the Latin word espurge meaning to purge, due to its use as a laxative.

  6. Category:Euphorbiaceae - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Euphorbiaceae

    Pages in category "Euphorbiaceae" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ().

  7. Category:Euphorbiaceae genera - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Euphorbiaceae_genera

    Category:Euphorbiaceae genera From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This category should contain only articles about the genera of Euphorbiaceae, when the articles are at the scientific name, or redirects from the scientific name in the case of monotypic taxa or articles at the English name.

  8. Aleurites - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleurites

    Aleurites is a small genus of arborescent flowering plants in the Euphorbiaceae, first described as a genus in 1776. It is native to China, the Indian Subcontinent, Southeast Asia, Papuasia, and Queensland.

  9. Euphorbiaceae - Encyclopedia Britannica | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/plant/Euphorbiaceae

    Euphorbiaceae, spurge family of flowering plants (order Malpighiales), containing some 6,745 species in 218 genera. Many members are important food sources. Many members are important food sources.

  10. Euphorbiaceae – Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre

    pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphorbiaceae

    Euphorbiaceae é, por alguns autores, dividida em numerosas famílias ou tida como polifilética e sua monofilia não é suportada por análises filogenéticas recentes baseadas em DNA. [ 1 ] A divisão desse grupo, traz a proposta de quatro famílias: Euphorbiaceae s.s., Phyllanthaceae, Picrodendraceae e Putranjivaceae.

  11. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

    V. Gordon Childe (1892–1957) was an Australian archaeologist who specialised in the study of European prehistory.He spent most of his life in the United Kingdom, working as an academic for the University of Edinburgh and then the Institute of Archaeology, London, and wrote twenty-six books during his career.