Yahoo Web Search

  1. About 40 search results

  1. Blunt definition, having an obtuse, thick, or dull edge or point; rounded; not sharp: a blunt pencil. See more.

  2. Repeating a word or phrase in a work of poetry or prose calls attention to it on behalf of the reader. This creates emphasis by highlighting the importance of the word or phrase. Therefore, the reader is more likely to consider the meaning of the word or phrase in a deeper way.

  3. As you can see, the three sentences above share the same situation, but, Sentences 2 and 3 paint a better picture because they use synonyms for some of the dull words in Sentence 1. Words like “rapidly,” “gobbling,” “awful,” and “terrible” are much more descriptive than “quickly,” “eating,” and “bad”—they have the ...

  4. Sep 07, 2022 · From the Greek word meaning “to cut,” tmesis is a literary device that cuts a word or phrase into two parts by inserting a word in between them. Example of Tmesis. Here are two silly samples from Pygmalion’s Eliza Doolittle: “Fan-bloody-tastic!” “Abso-blooming-lutely” 53. Tone. Tone can be tricky to define. Officially, in writing ...

  5. Perhaps the most famous example of poetic meter is iambic pentameter. An iamb is a metrical foot that consists of one short or unstressed syllable followed by a long or stressed syllable. The structure of iambic pentameter features five iambs per line, or ten total syllables per line. All the even-numbered syllables in this metric form are ...

  6. It is true that, as a matter of fact, the earliest uses of the word (the verb /xXoa04Eiv occurs in Herodotus and Thucydides) imply the idea of the pursuit of knowledge; but the distinction between the aogios, or wise man, and the 4nXoaoa50s, or lover of wisdom, appears first in the Platonic writings, and lends itself naturally to the so-called ...

  7. A figure of speech or rhetorical figure is a word or phrase that intentionally deviates from ordinary language use in order to produce a rhetorical effect. Figures of speech are traditionally classified into schemes, which vary the ordinary sequence of words, and tropes, where words carry a meaning other than what they ordinarily signify.

  1. People also search for