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  1. Today Philippine English, as formally called based on the World Englishes framework of linguist Braj Kachru, is a recognized variety of English with its distinct lexical, phonological, and grammatical features (with considerable variations across socioeconomic groups and level of education being predictors of English proficiency in the ...

  2. Feb 09, 2021 · Twelve languages are spoken by more than one million people. These include the languages mentioned above, Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilokano, Hiligaynon, and Waray-Waray, as well as Filipino (60 million speakers), Bikolano (4.6 million), Pampaneño (2.3 million), Tausug (1.23 million), Maranao (1.2 million) and Maguindanao (1.1 million). languages of ...

  3. Nov 30, 2016 · Waray is the fifth most spoken regional language of the Philippines. The name waray-waray comes from ‘waray’ means ‘none’ or ‘nothing.’ It is broadly oral in provinces like Biliran, Eastern Samar, Northern Samar and Eastern Visayas. The language is also used in local government, television and, radio broadcast. Hiligaynon

  4. www.slideshare.net › DrixlerAngelo › philippine-dialectsPhilippine Dialects - SlideShare

    Philippine Dialects. 2. Philippine Dialects • There are no fewer than 120 dialects all over the country • Most come from the Austronesian language • There are 19 auxiliary languages namely Aklanon, Bikol, Cebuano, Chavacano, Hiligaynon, Ibanag, Ilocano, Ivatan, Kapampangan, Kinaray-a, Maguindanao, Maranao, Pangasinan, Sambal, Surigaonon ...

  5. The language being taught all over the Philippines is Tagalog and English. Examples: ENGLISH-Good morning/afternoon/evening TAGALOG-Magandang umaga/hapon/gabi BIKOLANO-Marhay na aga/hapon/banggi CEBUANO-Maayong buntag/hapon/gabi KAPAMPANGAN-Mayap a abak/ a gatpanapun/ a bengi PANGASINAN-Masantos ya kabwasan/ya labi/ya ngarem WARAY-Maupay nga ...

  6. The “spacing” of syllables or entire words from each other are sometimes accentuated, which is not uncommon for most speakers of Philippine languages. “See” and “it” in “see it” are “interrupted” by a glottal stop, instead of being “connected” as one would in English. S-voicing [to make a /z/ sound] is weak in words like “deserted” and “disease.”

  7. Feb 06, 2019 · Among household population 5 years old and over, 63. 71 percent of them can speak English. NCR (81. 75 percent) was the highest across regions followed by Ilocos Region (73. 75 percent), CAR (70. 99 percent), and Central Luzon (70. 12 percent). The lowest was ARMM (29. 44 percent).

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