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  1. Filipinos today speak a variety of different languages including Cebuano, Tagalog, Ilocano, Ilonggo, and Bikolano, in addition to English—all of which are 90% Austronesian languages, and also contain up several Spanish loanwords. The Philippines still completely attained its entire languages and culture despite years of colonial rule.

    Spanish influence on Filipino culture - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_influence_on_Filipino_culture
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  3. La Union - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Union

    13 hours ago · In September 2012, the province of La Union passed an ordinance recognizing Ilocano (Iloko) as an official provincial language alongside Filipino and English, as national and official languages of the Philippines, respectively.

  4. Cebuano language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cebuano_language

    1 day ago · While Filipino (i. e., Tagalog) has the largest number of speakers among the languages of the Philippines, Cebuano had the largest native-language-speaking population in the Philippines, from the 1950s until about the 1980s. It is by far the most widely spoken of the Visayan languages. [not verified in body]

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  5. Sambal people - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sambal_people

    1 day ago · They speak mainly Sambal and Botolan, as well as Kapampangan, Tagalog, Ilocano, Bolinao, and Pangasinense. The Sambalic languages are most closely related to the Kapampangan language and an archaic form of Tagalog still spoken in Tanay in the province of Rizal.

  6. Baguio - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baguio

    13 hours ago · Ilocano, Tagalog and English are also understood by many inhabitants within and around the city. Festivities and Holidays [ edit ] The Panagbenga Festival , the annual Flower Festival, held in February, was created as a tribute to the city's flowers and as a way to rise up from the devastation of the 1990 Luzon earthquake .

  7. Spanish influence on Filipino culture - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_influence_on...

    13 hours ago · Filipinos today speak a variety of different languages including Cebuano, Tagalog, Ilocano, Ilonggo, and Bikolano, in addition to English—all of which are 90% Austronesian languages, and also contain up several Spanish loanwords. The Philippines still completely attained its entire languages and culture despite years of colonial rule.

  8. -on - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/-on
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    Etymology

    1. (Physics) From -on in electron, reinforced by Ancient Greek -ον (-on)ending neuter nouns and adjectives. 2. (Chemistry) From -on in carbon, first applied to boron and then to silicon.

    Suffix

    -on 1. (physics, mathematics and biology) Forming nouns denoting subatomic particles (proton), quanta (photon), molecular units (codon), or substances (interferon). 2. (biology, genetics) Forming names of things considered as basic or fundamental units, such as codon or recon. 3. (chemistry) Forming names of noble gases and certain nonmetal elements (such as boron or silicon).

    Anagrams

    1. N.O., NO, No, No., no, no.

    Alternative forms

    1. -hon (after vowels without glottal stops).

    Etymology

    From Proto-Philippine *ən, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *ən, from Proto-Austronesian *ən (see Ilocano -en and Tagalog -in).

    Suffix

    -on 1. Used to form nouns indicating objects, persons or action expressed by the root. 2. Demonym-forming suffix. 3. Object trigger verb suffix.

    Suffix

    -on 1. (organic chemistry) -one

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ɔn/

    Suffix

    -on 1. (organic chemistry) -one 2. (particles) -on

    Suffix

    -on 1. Suffix variant for the illative singular, see -Vn.

    Anagrams

    1. no

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ɔ̃/

    Etymology 1

    From Old French -on, a blending of Latin -ōnem (accusative singular of -ō, masculine appellative suffix), Frankish *-an (accusative of *-ō, ending of masculine weak declension nouns), Frankish *-in (diminutive suffix), and *-ing (diminutive suffix for animals, via -enc, -enz). Some also descend from the Celtic singulative *-onos, such as mouton.

    Etymology 2

    From Ancient Greek -ον (-on), neuter of -ος (-os), masculine adjective ending.

    Romanization

    -on 1. Romanization of -𐍉𐌽

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): [on]

    Suffix

    -on 1. (case suffix) on. Used to form the superessive case. 1.1. asztal (“table”) → az asztalon (“on the table”) 2. (verb-forming suffix, chiefly archaic or dialectal) Indefinite third-person singular suffix (currently only in the imperative mood as part of -jon, formerly also occurring in the indicative). 2.1. vagyon (“he/she/it is, there is”) (in the standard language: van)

    See also

    1. rajta 2. Category:Hungarian words taking -n/-on/-en/-ön 3. Category:Hungarian noun forms 4. Appendix:Hungarian suffixes

    Alternative forms

    1. -oian

    Etymology

    From Proto-Germanic *-ōną

    Suffix

    -on 1. (verbal suffix) used to form the infinitive of class 2 weak verbs (an alternative ending -oian is sometimes found instead of -on) 1.1. makon"to make" 1.2. haton"to hate"

    Suffix

    -on 1. Obsolete spelling of -ón

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