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    What are the most common early symptoms of HIV?

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  2. Sep 15, 2021 · The early signs of HIV may appear as symptoms similar to those caused by the flu. These can include: Early HIV symptoms generally arise within one to two months after transmission, although they can arrive as soon as two weeks after exposure, according to HIV.gov.

  3. Sep 16, 2021 · The virus causing Aids, now known as HIV, was identified in 1984. Soon thereafter a test for HIV antibodies – indicating exposure to the virus – was approved for use in the UK. The ability to test individuals, including those showing no symptoms, was transformative in terms of gathering data about the epidemic, but the results were alarming.

  4. Sep 13, 2021 · This causes a number of symptoms including: Night sweats Exhaustion Rapid weight loss Swelling of your lymph nodes Chronic diarrhea Frequent opportunistic infections like thrush or herpes Pneumonia Sores

    • Risk by Sexual Activity
    • Risk Factors in Women
    • Risk Factors in Men
    • Shared Vulnerabilities
    • Per-Exposure Risk
    • Accidental Exposure Risk
    • A Word from Verywell

    When discussing HIV risk, people often try to ascertain which "type" of sex is riskier; vaginal, anal, or oral. From a purely statistical standpoint, anal sex is considered the highest risk activity with an almost 18-fold greater risk of infection compared to vaginal sex.3 But this assessment is somewhat misleading, at least from an individual perspective. While vaginal sex may pose a “lower” risk comparatively, the figures neither take into account the way in which the disease is distributed between men and women nor the vulnerabilities which place some individuals at extremely high risk of infection. There are some men who are far more likely to get HIV than others. Studies have shown, for example, that uncircumcised men are more than twice as likely to get HIV after vaginal sex than circumcised men.4 Vulnerabilities vary by individual, so assessing what the real risk of vaginal sex requires a better understanding of the factors that place some women and men at greater risk than...

    The risk of HIV from unprotected vaginal sex is higher among women for a number of reasons. From a physiological standpoint, the tissues of the vagina (epithelium) are far more susceptible to HIV than those of the penis.5 HIV is able to pass through these tissues when the immune system recognizes the invading virus and send defensive cells (called macrophages and dendritic cells) to "grab and drag" them through the lining to be destroyed. Instead, HIV turns the table and attacks the very cells (called CD4 T-cells) meant to help neutralize them. By doing so, the body helps facilitate its own infection. And, because the surface area of the vaginal epithelium is far greater than that of the male urethra, the opportunity for infection is increased, often exponentially. Other physiological vulnerabilities include: 1. Cells beneath the surface of the cervix are especially vulnerable to HIV, particularly during adolescence, a woman's first pregnancy, or in the presence of a sexually trans...

    The fact that men are less susceptible to HIV than women shouldn't underplay the fact that they also have vulnerabilities that can increase their personal risk of infection. We know, for example, that an uncircumcised penis can facilitate infection due to the bacteria-rich environment beneath the foreskin. In response, the body will produce a type of dendritic cell (called Langerhans cells) to help control the bacteria.8 When a man has unprotected sex with an HIV-positive woman, Langerhans cells can "grab and drag" the virus and present it to CD4 T-cells, inadvertently facilitating HIV infection. Sexually transmitted infections and genital tract infections can further increase the risk of HIV.9 From a cultural standpoint, society’s definition of masculinity can often normalize sexual adventure in men and even encourage it. It creates a double standard that can place a man at greater risk of HIV by associating virility with multiple partners or other high-risk behaviors.

    There are vulnerabilities that increase the likelihood of infection in both men and women. Drinking alcohol or taking drugs can lower inhibitions and affects a person's ability to make safe choices, such as using condoms or remaining adherent to HIV drug therapy. Any increase in the infected partner’s viral load (the amount of virus in the blood) increases the risk to the uninfected partner. 10 A high viral load during acute infection(the stage immediately following exposure) is associated with an increase in HIV risk.

    From the perspective of per-exposure risk (the chance of getting HIV from a single sexual act), risk can vary based on gender, the viral load of the HIV-positive partner, and even the part of the world you live in.10 These figures do not take into account any other factors that can increase risk, including the presence of an STI, injecting drug use, or a co-existing infection like hepatitis C.

    If you believe you may have been exposed to HIV, either through a condom burst of condomless anal sex, there are medications that can greatly reduce your risk of infection, called post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP).12 PEP consists of a 28-day course of antiretroviral drugs, which must be taken completely and without interruption.

    Assessing your personal risk for HIV should never be a numbers game. Whether the odds are one in 10 or one in 100,000, it’s important to remember that you can get HIV after just one exposure. In addition to PrEP, you should ensure that your partner is on antiretroviral therapy if he or she has HIV. Doing so may entirely erase the risk of transmission. And don't forget the tried-and-true condom, which is associated with a decrease in risk if used correctly and consistently. By formulating a holistic approach to prevention, you can continue to enjoy a healthy sex life while protecting yourself or a loved one from the risk of HIV.

  5. 2 days ago · Human papillomavirus infection ( HPV infection) is an infection caused by human papillomavirus ( HPV ), a DNA virus from the Papillomaviridae family. Many HPV infections cause no symptoms and 90% resolve spontaneously within two years. However, in some cases, an HPV infection persists and results in either warts or precancerous lesions.

    • Most people are infected at some point in time
    • None, warts
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  3. Don't Waste Time. Get PrEP For HIV Prevention. Lower Your Risk By Up To 99%. Learn More! Feel Great & Be Safe W/ PrEP. Take An At-Home Test & Get A Quick, Easy Prescription

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