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  1. Freddy Fender - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Freddy_Fender

    Freddy Fender (born Baldemar Garza Huerta; June 4, 1937 – October 14, 2006) was an American Tejano, country and rock and roll musician, known for his work as a solo artist and in the groups Los Super Seven and the Texas Tornados.

  2. Freddy Fender Wiki, Biography, Age, Career, Relationship, Net ...

    wikitrusted.com › freddy-fender-wikipedia

    Jul 16, 2021 · Freddy Fender Wiki, Biography, Age as Wikipedia. Freddy Fender was an American Tejano, country and rock and roll musician, known for his work as a solo artist and in the groups Los Super Seven and the Texas Tornados. He is best known for his 1975 hits “Before the Next Teardrop Falls” and the subsequent remake of his own “Wasted Days and ...

  3. Freddy Fender — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Freddy_Fender
    • Early Years
    • Initial Success
    • Number One on Pop and Country Charts
    • Later Years
    • Death and Legacy
    • Film Credits
    • Discography
    • Honors
    • References
    • External Links

    Fender was born in San Ben­ito, Texas to Mar­garita Garza and her Mex­i­can im­mi­grant hus­band, Ser­a­pio Huerta. He made his debut radio per­for­mance at age 10 on Har­lin­gen, Texas's radio sta­tion KGBT, singing a then-hit "Paloma Querida." Fender dropped out of high school at age 16 in 1953, and when he turned 17, he en­listed for three years in the U.S. Ma­rine Corps. He served time in the brig on sev­eral oc­ca­sions be­cause of his drink­ing, and he was court mar­tialed in Au­gust 1956 and dis­charged with rank of pri­vate (E-1). Ac­cord­ing to Fender, he later re­ceived a let­ter from the U.S. De­part­ment of the Navy say­ing that he had been wrong­fully dis­charged dis­hon­or­ably be­cause of al­co­holism, and he was given a gen­eral discharge. He re­turned to Texas and played night­clubs, bars, and honky-tonks through­out the south, mostly to Latino au­di­ences. In 1957, then known as El Bebop Kid, he re­leased two songs to mod­er­ate suc­cess in Mex­ico and South Amer­i...

    In 1959 Fender recorded the blues bal­lad "Wasted Days and Wasted Nights." The song was a hit, but he was beset by legal trou­bles in May 1960 after he and a band mem­ber were ar­rested for pos­ses­sion of mar­i­juana in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. After serv­ing nearly three years in the Louisiana State Pen­i­ten­tiary, he was re­leased through the in­ter­ven­tion of then-gov­er­nor Jim­mie Davis, also a song­writer and mu­si­cian. Davis re­quested that Fender stay away from music while on pro­ba­tion as a con­di­tion of his re­lease. How­ever, in a 1990 NPR in­ter­view on Fresh Air with Terry Gross (re­broad­cast Oc­to­ber 17, 2006),Fender said that the con­di­tion for pa­role was to stay away from places that served al­co­hol. By the end of the 1960s, Fender was back in Cor­pus Christi, Texas, work­ing as a me­chanic and at­tend­ing local col­lege, Del Mar Col­lege, while play­ing music only on the week­ends.

    In 1974 Fender recorded "Be­fore the Next Teardrop Falls." The sin­gle was se­lected for na­tional dis­tri­b­u­tion and be­came a num­ber-one hit on the Bill­board Coun­try and Pop charts. It sold over a mil­lion copies and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA in May 1975. His next three sin­gles, "Se­cret Love," "You'll Lose a Good Thing," and a re­make of "Wasted Days and Wasted Nights," all reached num­ber one on the Bill­board Coun­try charts. Be­tween 1975 and 1983 Fender charted 21 coun­try hits, in­clud­ing "Since I Met You Baby," "Vaya con Dios," "Livin' It Down," and "The Rains Came." "Wasted Days and Wasted Nights" be­came Fender's sec­ond mil­lion-sell­ing sin­gle, with the gold disc pre­sen­ta­tion tak­ing place in Sep­tem­ber 1975. Fender also was suc­cess­ful on the pop charts. Be­sides "Be­fore the Next Teardrop Falls" reach­ing num­ber one on the pop charts in May 1975, "Wasted Days And Wasted Nights" went into the pop top 10 and "Se­cret Love" into the top 20. "Since...

    Texas Tornados

    In 1989 Fender teamed up with fel­low Tex–Mex mu­si­cians Doug Sahm, Flaco Jiménez, and Augie Mey­ers to form the Texas Tor­na­dos, whose work meshed con­junto, Te­jano, R&B, coun­try, and blues to wide ac­claim. When the Texas Tor­na­dos went to au­di­tion for Warner Bros. Records, Fender did not think that the group was strong enough, so he brought his own band. The au­di­tion was nearly a bust, be­cause he played coun­try music and that was not what the ex­ec­u­tives were look­ing for. Fen...

    Los Super 7

    In the late 1990s, Fender joined an­other su­per­group, Los Super Seven, with Los Lobos' David Hi­dalgo and César Rosas, Flaco Jiménez, Ruben Ramos, Joe Ely, and coun­try singer Rick Trevino. The group won a 1998 Grammy in the Mex­i­can Amer­i­can Per­for­mance cat­e­gory for their self-ti­tled disc.

    Later work

    In 2001 Fender made his final stu­dio record­ing, a col­lec­tion of clas­sic Mex­i­can boleros ti­tled La Música de Balde­mar Huerta that brought him a third Grammy award, this time in the cat­e­gory of Latin Pop Album. Rose Reyes, who worked with Fender in 2004 for a Texas Folk­life and Austin trib­ute ti­tled "Fifty Years of Freddy Fender," said of the album: "When he did Mex­i­can stan­dards at that point in his ca­reer, I ex­pected it to be good be­cause he's a per­fec­tion­ist. But that...

    On March 13, 2001, Fender was er­ro­neously re­ported to be dead by Bill­board. He laughed off the mag­a­zine's error. He un­der­went a kid­ney trans­plant in 2002 with a kid­ney do­nated by his daugh­ter and un­der­went a liver trans­plant in 2004. Nonethe­less, his con­di­tion con­tin­ued to worsen. He was suf­fer­ing from an "in­cur­able can­cer" in which he had tu­mors on his lungs. On De­cem­ber 31, 2005, Fender per­formed his last con­cert and re­sumed chemother­apy. He died on Oc­to­ber 14, 2006, at the age of 69 of lung can­cer at his home in Cor­pus Christi, Texas, with his fam­ily at his bed­side. He was buried in his home­town of San Benito. He had said in a 2004 in­ter­view with the As­so­ci­ated Press that he wished to be­come the first Mex­i­can Amer­i­can in­ducted into the Coun­try Music Hall of Fame. A Freddy Fender Mu­seum and The Con­junto Music Mu­seum opened No­vem­ber 17, 2007, in San Ben­ito. They share a build­ing with the San Ben­ito His­tor­i­cal Mu­seum. H...

    In 1988 Fender played the mayor of a small town in the Robert Red­ford–di­rected film The Mi­la­gro Bean­field War. Fender also ap­peared as Tony in the prison movie Short Eyes, a 1977 film adap­ta­tion, di­rected by Robert M. Young, of the Miguel Pinero play.Fender played the role of Pan­cho Villa in 1979's She Came to the Val­ley (later re­leased as Texas in Flames). The movie was di­rected by Al­bert Band and based on the book by Cleo Daw­son. Fender also ap­peared as him­self in an episode of the tele­vi­sion se­ries The Dukes of Haz­zard.

    Albums

    1. ATex Mex peaked at No. 6 on the RPMCountry Albums chart in Canada.

    Academy of Country Music (1975)—"Most Promising Male Vocalist"
    Country Music Association (1975)—"Single of the Year" for "Before the Next Teardrop Falls"
    Grammy nominations in 1975, 1976, and 1997
    Tejano Music Hall of Fame (1987)
    Tucker, Stephen R. (1998). "Freddy Fender." In The Encyclopedia of Country Music. Paul Kingsbury, Editor. New York: Oxford University Press. pp.–170–71.
    John Broven, South to Louisiana: Music of the Cajun Bayous(Gretna, La.: Pelican Press, 1983).
    Shane K. Bernard, Swamp Pop: Cajun and Creole Rhythm and Blues(Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1996).
    "Remembering Freddy", National Public Radio, Fresh Air with Terry Gross, October 17, 2006. A remembrance of Fender and his music with other links.
  4. The Best of Freddy Fender - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › The_Best_of_Freddy_Fender

    The Best of Freddy Fender is a greatest hits album by Freddy Fender that was released in 1977. The 1980 reissue MCA cassette tape version erroneously states the title on the end spine as "The Best of Freddy Fender Plus Seven". Track listing. Before the Next Teardrop Falls" (Ben Peters, Vivian Keith)

    • 1977
    • Dot
  5. Freddy Fender | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Freddy_Fender
    • Early Years
    • Initial Success
    • Number One on Pop and Country Charts
    • Later Years
    • Death and Legacy
    • Film Credits
    • Discography
    • Honors
    • References
    • External Links

    Fender was born in San Benito, Texas, United Statesto Margarita (Garza) Huerta and her Mexican immigrant husband Serapio Huerta. He made his first radio appearance at age 10 on Harlingen's radio station KGBT, singing a then hit, "Paloma Querida". Fender dropped out of high school at age 16 in 1953, and when he turned 17, he enlisted for three years in the U.S. Marine Corps. He served time in the brig on several occasions because of his drinking, and he was court martialed in August 1956 and discharged with rank of private (E-1). According to Fender, he later received a letter from the U.S. Department of the Navy saying that he had been wrongfully discharged dishonorably because of alcoholism, and he was given a general discharge. He returned to Texas and played nightclubs, bars, and honky-tonks throughout the south, mostly to Latino audiences. In 1957, then known as El Bebop Kid, he released two songs to moderate success in Mexico and South America: Spanish-language versions of Elvi...

    In 1959, Fender recorded the blues ballad "Wasted Days and Wasted Nights". The song was a hit, but he was beset by legal troubles in May 1960 after he and a band member were arrested for possession of marijuana in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. After serving nearly three years in the Angola prison farm, he was released through the intervention of then-governor Jimmie Davis, also a songwriter and musician. Davis requested that Fender stay away from music while on probation as a condition of his release. However, in a 1990 NPR interview on Fresh Air with Terry Gross (rebroadcast October 17, 2006),Fender said that the condition for parole was to stay away from places that served alcohol. By the end of the 1960s, Fender was back in Texas working as a mechanic, and attending a local junior college, while playing music only on the weekends.

    In 1974, Fender recorded "Before the Next Teardrop Falls". The single was selected for national distribution and became a number one hit on the Billboard Country and Pop charts. It sold over a million copies and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA in May 1975. His next three singles, "Secret Love", "You'll Lose a Good Thing", and a remake of "Wasted Days and Wasted Nights", all reached number one on the Billboard Country charts. Between 1975 and 1983, Fender charted 21 country hits, including "Since I Met You Baby", "Vaya con Dios", "Livin' It Down", and "The Rains Came". "Wasted Days and Wasted Nights" became Fender's second million-selling single, with the gold disc presentation taking place in September 1975. Fender also was successful on the pop charts. Besides "Before the Next Teardrop Falls" reaching number one on the pop charts in May 1975, "Wasted Days And Wasted Nights" went into the pop top 10 and "Secret Love" into the top 20. "Since I Met You Baby", "You'll Lose A Good T...

    Texas Tornados

    In 1989, Fender teamed up with fellow Tex–Mex musicians Doug Sahm, Flaco Jiménez, and Augie Meyers to form the Texas Tornados, whose work meshed conjunto, Tejano, R&B, country, and blues to wide acclaim. When the Texas Tornados went to audition for Warner Bros. Records, Fender did not think that the group was strong enough, so he brought his own band. The audition was nearly a bust, because he played country music and that was not what the executives were looking for. Fender was persuaded to...

    Los Super 7

    In the late 1990s, Fender joined another supergroup, Los Super Seven, with Los Lobos' David Hidalgo and Cesar Rosas, Flaco Jiménez, Ruben Ramos, Joe Ely, and country singer Rick Trevino. The group won a 1998 Grammy in the Mexican American Performance category for their self-titled disc.

    Later work

    In 2001, Fender made his final studio recording, a collection of classic Mexican boleros titled La Música de Baldemar Huertathat brought him a third Grammy award, this time in the category of Latin Pop Album. Rose Reyes, who worked with Fender in 2004 for a Texas Folklife and Austin tribute titled "Fifty Years of Freddy Fender", said of the album, "When he did Mexican standards at that point in his career, I expected it to be good because he's a perfectionist. But that record is so beautifull...

    On March 13, 2001, Freddy Fender was erroneously reported to be dead by Billboard. He laughed off the magazine's error.He underwent a kidney transplant in 2002 with a kidney donated by his daughter and underwent a liver transplant in 2004. Nonetheless, his condition continued to worsen. He was suffering from an "incurable cancer" in which he had tumors on his lungs. On December 31, 2005, Fender performed his last concert and resumed chemotherapy. He died in 2006 at the age of 69 of lung cancer at his home in Corpus Christi, Texas, with his family at his bedside. He was buried in his hometown of San Benito. He had said in a 2004 interview with the Associated Press that he wished to become the first Mexican American inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. A Freddy Fender Museum and The Conjunto Music Museum opened November 17, 2007, in San Benito. They share a building with the San Benito Historical Museum. His family maintains the Freddy Fender Scholarship Fund, and donates to...

    In 1988, Fender played the mayor of a small New Mexico town in the Robert Redford–directed film The Milagro Beanfield War. Fender also appeared as Tony in the prison movie Short Eyes, a 1977 film adaptation, directed by Robert M. Young, of the Miguel Pinero play.Fender played the role of Pancho Villa in 1979's She Came to the Valley (later released as Texas in Flames). The movie was directed by Albert Band and based on the book by Cleo Dawson. Fender also appeared as himself in an episode of the television series The Dukes of Hazzard.

    Albums

    1. ATex Mex peaked at No. 6 on the RPMCountry Albums chart in Canada.

    Academy of Country Music (1975) - "Most Promising Male Vocalist"
    Country Music Association (1975) - "Single of the Year" for "Before the Next Teardrop Falls"
    Grammy nominations in 1975, 1976, and 1997
    Tejano Music Hall of Fame (1987)
    Tucker, Stephen R. (1998). "Freddy Fender". In The Encyclopedia of Country Music. Paul Kingsbury, Editor. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 170–1.
    John Broven, South to Louisiana: Music of the Cajun Bayous(Gretna, La.: Pelican Press, 1983).
    Shane K. Bernard, Swamp Pop: Cajun and Creole Rhythm and Blues(Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1996).
  6. Before the Next Teardrop Falls (song) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Before_the_Next_Teardrop

    A showcase of Fender's tenor and Meaux's Tex-Mex musical styling, "Before the Next Teardrop Falls" jump-started his career. (Fender's career had stalled in 1960 after his arrest on drug charges.) In the months and years that followed, Fender recorded several bilingual standards which became major hits, most notably "Secret Love".

    • "Waiting for Your Love"
    • January 1975
  7. Before the Next Teardrop Falls - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Before_the_Next_Teardrop_Falls

    The Rolling Stone Album Guide. Before The Next Teardrop Falls is an album by Freddy Fender. His first album, it was released in 1974. The album includes the number-one hits "Before the Next Teardrop Falls" and "Wasted Days and Wasted Nights". It peaked at No. 20 on the Billboard 200.

  8. Freddy Fender - Biography - IMDb

    www.imdb.com › name › nm0271733

    Freddy Fender was born on June 4, 1937 in San Benito, Texas, USA as Baldemar Garza Huerta. He was an actor, known for Hancock (2008), The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005) and Boyhood (2014).

  9. Freddy Fender age, hometown, biography | Last.fm

    www.last.fm › music › Freddy+Fender

    Oct 14, 2006 · Freddy Fender (born Baldemar Garza Huerta in San Benito, Texas, USA on 4 June 1937 – 14 October 2006) was a Mexican-American Tejano, country and rock and roll musician, known for his work as a solo artist and in the groups Los Super Seven and the Texas Tornados. He is best known for his 1975 hits "Before the Next Teardrop Falls" and the subsequent remake of his own "Wasted Days and Wasted Nights".

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