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  1. Frederick I (Swedish: Fredrik I; 28 April 1676 – 5 April 1751) was prince consort of Sweden from 1718 to 1720, and King of Sweden from 1720 until his death and (as Frederick I) also Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel from 1730.

    Frederick I of Sweden - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_I_of_Sweden
  2. Frederick I of Sweden - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_I_of_Sweden

    Frederick I (Swedish: Fredrik I; 28 April 1676 – 5 April 1751) was prince consort of Sweden from 1718 to 1720, and King of Sweden from 1720 until his death and (as Frederick I) also Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel from 1730.

  3. Frederick (I) | king of Sweden | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/.../Frederick-I-king-of-Sweden

    Frederick (I), (born April 17, 1676, Kassel, Hesse-Kassel [Germany]—died March 25, 1751, Stockholm), first Swedish king to reign (1720–51) during the 18th-century Age of Freedom, a period of parliamentary government. Frederick was the eldest surviving son of the landgrave of Hesse-Kassel.

  4. Frederick I of Denmark - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_I_of_Denmark

    Frederick I (7 October 1471 – 10 April 1533) was the king of Denmark and Norway. His name is also spelled Frederik in Danish and Norwegian, Friedrich in German and Fredrik in Swedish. He was the last Roman Catholic monarch to reign over Denmark, when subsequent monarchs embraced Lutheranism after the Protestant Reformation.

  5. Frederick I of Sweden | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org/wiki/Frederick_I_of_Sweden
    • Youth
    • King of Sweden
    • Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel
    • Family and Issue
    • References
    • Notes

    He was the son of Charles I, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel, and Princess Maria Amalia of Courland. In 1692 the young prince made his Grand Tour to the Dutch Republic, in 1695 to the Italian Peninsula and later he studied in Geneva. After this he had a military career, leading the Hessian troops as Lieutenant General in the War of the Spanish Succession on the side of the Dutch. He was defeated in 1703 in the Battle of Speyerbach, but participated the next year in the great victory in the Battle of Blenheim. In 1706 he was again defeated by the French in the Battle of Castiglione. Both in 1716 and 1718 he joined the campaign of Charles XII of Sweden against Norway, and was appointed Swedish Generalissimus.

    Frederick succeeded Ulrika Eleonora on the throne upon her abdication in his favor in 1720, elected by the Swedish Estates. The defeats suffered by Charles XII in the Great Northern War ended Sweden's position as a first-rank European power. Under Frederick, this had to be accepted. Sweden also had to cede Estonia, Ingria and Livonia to Russia in the Treaty of Nystad, in 1721. Frederick I was a very active and dynamic king at the beginning of his 31-year reign. But after the aristocracy had regained power during the wars with Russia, he became not so much powerless as uninterested in affairs of state. In 1723, he tried to strengthen royal authority, but after he failed, he never had much to do with politics. He did not even sign official documents; instead a stamp of his signature was used. He devoted most of his time to hunting and love affairs. His marriage to Queen Ulrika Eleonora was childless, but he had several children by his mistress, Hedvig Taube. In 1723 Frederick rewarded...

    Frederick became Landgrave of Hesse only in 1730, ten years after becoming King of Sweden. He immediately appointed his younger brother Williamgovernor of Hesse. As Landgrave, Frederick is generally not seen as a success. Indeed, he did concentrate more on Sweden, and due to his negotiated, compromise-like ascension to the throne there, he and his court had a very low income. The money for that very expensive court, then, since the 1730s came from wealthy Hesse, and this means that Frederick essentially behaved like an absentee landlord and drained Hessian resources to finance life in Sweden. Also, Frederick's father, Charles I of Hesse-Kassel, had been the state's most successful ruler, rebuilding the state over his decades-long rule by means of economic and infrastructure measures and state reform, as well as tolerance, such as attracting, for economic purposes, the French Huguenots. His brother the governor, who would succeed Frederick as Landgrave William VIII of Hesse-Kassel, t...

    On 31 May 1700, he married his first wife, Louise Dorothea, Princess of Prussia (1680–1705), daughter of Frederick I of Prussia (1657–1713) and Elizabeth Henrietta of Hesse-Kassel(1661–1683). Louise Dorothea died in childbirth in December 1705. His second wife, whom he married in 1715, was Ulrika Eleonora, Princess of Sweden, (1688–1741), daughter of Charles XI of Sweden (1655–1697) and of Ulrika Eleonora of Denmark(1656–1693). Ulrika suffered two miscarriages, one in 1715 and another in 1718, after which there are no further recorded pregnancies. Frederick I had three extramarital children with his mistress Hedvig Taube: 1. Frederick William von Hessenstein(1735–1808). 2. Charles Edward von Hessenstein(1737–1769). 3. Hedwig Amalia von Hessenstein(1743–1752). After the death of Hedvig Taube, his official mistress was the noblewoman Catharina Ebba Horn, whom he gave the title and recognition of German-Roman Countess (1745–1748). Thus, the Hessian line in Sweden ended with him and was...

    Spencer, Charles. Blenheim: Battle for Europe. Phoenix, 2005. ISBN 0-304-36704-4
    Stålberg, Wilhelmina; Berg, P. G. (1864). "190 (Anteckningar om svenska qvinnor)" (in sv). http://runeberg.org/sqvinnor/0218.html.
    ↑ Hofberg, Herman; Heurlin, Frithiof; Millqvist, Viktor; Rubenson, Olof (1908) (in Swedish). Svenskt Biografiskt Handlexikon – Uggleupplagan. 8 (2nd ed.). Stockholm, Sweden: Albert Bonniers Förlag....
    ↑ "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". Archived from the original on September 4, 2007. https://web.archive.org/web/20070904113914/http://nygaard.howards.net/files/3/4049.htm. Ret...
    • (1676-04-28)28 April 1676 Kassel, Hesse-Kassel
    • Lutheran prev. Calvinist
    • Ulrika Eleonora
    • William VIII
  6. About: Frederick I of Sweden

    dbpedia.org/resource/Frederick_I_of_Sweden

    Frederick I, Swedish: Fredrik I, (28 April 1676 – 5 April 1751) was prince consort of Sweden from 1718 to 1720, and King of Sweden from 1720 until his death and (as Frederick I) also Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel from 1730.

  7. Frederick I of Sweden - Timenote

    timenote.info/ru/person/view?id=3060389

    Frederick I, (17 April 1676 – 25 March 1751) was a prince consort of Sweden from 1718 to 1720, and a King of Sweden from 1720 until his death and (as Frederick I) also Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel from 1730.

  8. Frederick I of Sweden - Hyperleap

    hyperleap.com/topic/Frederick_I_of_Sweden

    Frederick I (Fredrik I; 28 April 1676 – 5 April 1751) was prince consort of Sweden from 1718 to 1720, and King of Sweden from 1720 until his death and (as Frederick I) also Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel from 1730. Frederick I of Sweden, the next landgrave, became by marriage King of Sweden.

  9. Adolf Frederick I of Sweden | Historica Wiki | Fandom

    historica.fandom.com/.../Adolf_Frederick_I_of_Sweden

    Adolf Fredrik I of Sweden (14 May 1710-12 February 1771) was the king of Sweden from 1751 to 1771, succeeding Frederick I of Sweden and preceding Gustav III of Sweden.

  10. Fredrik I av Sverige - Wikimedia Commons

    commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fredrik_I_av_Sverige

    Nov 22, 2014 · English: Frederick I of Sweden (April 23, 1676–March 25, 1751), King of Sweden from 1720 and (as Friedrich I von Hessen-Kassel) Landgrave of Hesse-Cassel from 1730. Painting by unknown artist Engraving by Martin Engelbrecht, c. 1745 Painted by Martin van Mijtens the elder, c. 1730

  11. Adolf Frederick, King of Sweden - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolf_Frederick,_King_of...

    Adolf Frederick or Adolph Frederick (Swedish: Adolf Fredrik, German: Adolf Friedrich; 14 May 1710 – 12 February 1771) was King of Sweden from 1751 until his death. He was the son of Christian August of Holstein-Gottorp, Prince of Eutin, and Albertina Frederica of Baden-Durlach.