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    • Gangs of New York

      • Plot. In the slum neighborhood of Five Points, Manhattan in 1846, two gangs have engaged in a final battle (or "challenge") in Paradise Square over "who holds sway over the ...
      • Cast
      • Production. The country was up for grabs, and New York was a powder keg. ...
      • Historicity. ...
      • Release. ...
      • Reception. ...
      • Awards
      • See also
      • References. ...
      • Further reading. ...
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gangs_of_New_York#:~:text=Gangs%20of%20New%20York%201%20Plot.%20In%20the,...%2010%20Further%20reading.%20...%20More%20items...%20
  1. People also ask

    What gangs are in New York City?

    How historically accurate is gangs of New York?

    What was the first gang in New York?

    What are the names of the gangs in New York?

  2. Gangs of New York: The History That Inspired the Movie ...

    reelrundown.com/film-industry/The-History-of-The...

    Jul 21, 2020 · Was "Gangs of New York" a True Story? While Scorsese took some artistic liberties, much of the history depicted in the film is based on historical characters and attitudes of the time. However, much of the violence in the movie and particularly in Ashbury's book was exaggerated.

  3. THE TRUTH ABOUT THE ‘GANGS OF NEW YORK’

    nypost.com/.../the-truth-about-the-gangs-of-new-york

    Feb 24, 2003 · When the Civil War riots, depicted in Martin Scorsese’s “Gangs of New York,” exploded 150 years ago, black New Yorkers caught the brunt of it. For four days in July 1863, a group …

    • Neil Graves
  4. What Was It Like to Live in the Real "Gangs of New York"?

    www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/3/oscars...

    Mar 23, 2003 · "The book The Gangs of New York says there was one tenement where there was a murder a day. At the period of time he was writing about, there was barely a murder a month in all of New York City ...

  5. How Historically Accurate is the movie Gangs of New York ...

    www.dailyhistory.org/How_Historically_Accurate_is...
    • The Plot
    • The Five Points
    • The Violence and The Gangs
    • The Fictionalization of Characters
    • New York City Draft Riots 1863
    • How Accurate Is The Movie
    • Further Reading

    The movie starts with Bill the Butcher killing the leader of an Irish gang named Priest Vallon played by Liam Nesson in the 1850s. The 'Priest' s son Amsterdam Vallon returns to the Five-Points, and plots revenge against Bill the Butcher for killing his father, during the American Civil War. Di Caprio’s character successfully ingratiates himself into Bill's mob, but he does not reveal his true identity. The movie's plot is driven by both his desire to kill Bill and his growing admiration for...

    The Scorsese movie is one that has a definite sense of place, and the director sought to bring the Five Points neighborhood of the 1860s to life. There was a lavish amount of money spent to make sure that the motion picture was as realistic as possible and that viewers had a sense of what it was like to live in a 19th-century urban slum. The Five Points neighborhood was a real-life area. It was the most notorious slum in New York, and it was crime-ridden and a center of prostitution in the ci...

    Gangs of New York is a compromisingly violent movie, and it is typical of Scorsese’s oeuvre. Many commentators likened it to modern gangster movies. The motion picture focuses on the recurring fights and battles between the native gangs led by Bill the Butcher and the Irish gangs. At the start of the film, Bill the Butcher and his mob engage in a pitched street battle with the Irish gang led by the Priest Vallon. The gangs are shown to be armed with weapons such as swords and axes. In other v...

    In the 1860s, there were many well-known and influential gang leaders in New York. Indeed, history offers many infamous and colorful characters that could have been used by the makers of the Gangs of New York. However, by and large, the characters are all fictional. Bill the Butcher was not a real figure, but he was probably based on William Poole an infamous gang leader from the 1840s. Like Bill, he was virulently anti-Catholic and disliked immigrants but he was murdered before the start of...

    The climax of the movie is a vicious fight between Amsterdam and Bill the Butcher. This takes place during a riot by mainly Irish residents against the draft. The riot was a historical event, and it was one of the worst outbreaks of public disorder in the history of New York City. The New York City Draft Riots of 1863 were a violent expression of growing discontent among the poor and the working class. The economy of New York had suffered greatly during the war and unemployment was high and w...

    However, there are many exaggerations and inaccuracies. These include overstating the violence that took place at the time in the Five Points. The nature of the gangs and their motivations is not portrayed particularly accurately. Additionally, all of the characters and gangs in the movie are all fictional. The most serious inaccuracy is the distortion of the Draft Riots of 1863. Hopefully, someone makes a movie that does accurately portray these riots. On this basis, it could be said that th...

    Bruce W. Dearstyne, The Spirit of New York: Defining Events in the Empire State's History (Albany: Excelsior Editions, 2015)Herbert Asbury, The Gangs of New York (New York, Garden City, 1928)Barnett Schecter, The Devil's Own Work: The Civil War Draft Riots and the Fight to Reconstruct America (New York, Bloomsbury Publishing, 2005)

  6. The Real Gangs of New York – 5-Minute History

    fiveminutehistory.com/the-real-gangs-of-new-york

    Aug 09, 2017 · Based on Herbert Asbury’s 1927 book, Martin Scorcese’s 2002 movie “Gangs of New York” received a host of awards and was generally praised for its historical accuracy, including the names of the original gangs of the Five Points—the Bowery Boys, the Dead Rabbits, the Plug Uglies, the Short Tails, the Slaughter Houses, the Swamp Angels.

  7. Gangs of New York - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gangs_of_New_York

    Gangs of New York is a 2002 American epic period crime drama film that was directed by Martin Scorsese, set in the New York City slums, and inspired by Herbert Asbury's 1927 nonfiction book The Gangs of New York. The screenplay was written by Jay Cocks, Steven Zaillian, and Kenneth Lonergan.

  8. 7 Infamous Gangs of New York - HISTORY

    www.history.com/news/7-infamous-gangs-of-new-york
    • The Forty Thieves
    • The Bowery Boys
    • The Dead Rabbits
    • The Daybreak Boys
    • The Whyos
    • The Five Points Gang
    • The Eastman Gang

    One of Gotham’s earliest known criminal outfits, the Forty Thieves operated between the 1820s and 1850s in the Five Points neighborhood of Manhattan. This band of Irish thugs, pickpockets and ne’er-do-wells first came together in a grocery store and dive bar owned by a woman named Rosanna Peers. Under the leadership of Edward Coleman—a notorious rogue who was later hanged for beating his wife to death—what started as a motley group of petty criminals soon blossomed into a feared street gang w...

    One of the most storied gangs of New York, the Bowery Boys were a band of lower Manhattan toughs who clashed with the Irish Five Points gangs during the 1840s, 50s and 60s. Unlike some of their criminal counterparts, most of the Bowery Boys dressed in elegant clothing and held legitimate employment as printers, mechanics and other apprentice tradesmen. But when they weren’t on the job, these young hoodlums haunted the saloons and back alleys of the Bowery and engaged in bloody turf wars with...

    This crew of Irish immigrants was one of the most feared gangs to emerge from Five Points, so named for its location at the intersection of five crooked, narrow, downtown streets. For more than 60 years, Five Points (near modern-day Chinatown) was one of the city’s most notorious—and dangerous–neighborhoods. Throughout the 1850s, the Dead Rabbits excelled at robbery, pick-pocketing and brawling—particularly with their sworn enemies, the Bowery Boys. The group was made up mostly of young men,...

    New York’s 19th-century gang activity wasn’t limited to the rough and tumble streets of Manhattan—it also extended into the waters of the East River. The Daybreak Boys were one of the most ruthless crews of “river pirates” who preyed on the city’s booming shipping industry during the late 1840s and 1850s. As their name suggests, the Daybreakers— whose leaders went by such colorful monikers as Cow-legged Sam McCarthy and Slobbery Jim —preferred to strike in the hours before dawn. Using small r...

    Formed from the remnants of several defunct Five Points outfits, the Whyos were one of the most dominant New York street gangs from the 1860s to the 1890s. The group started out as a loose collection of petty thugs, pickpockets and murderers, but by the 1880s they had graduated to more high-class crime like counterfeiting, prostitution and racketeering. As their grip on Manhattan tightened, many of the gang even opened legitimate side businesses such as casinos and saloons.They may have masqu...

    This legendary mob came together in the 1890s, when the Italian gangster Paul Kelly united the remaining members of the Dead Rabbits, Whyos and other Five Points gangs under his own banner. From his headquarters in the New Brighton Dance Hall, Kelly marshaled an army of 1,500 thugs in bloody turf wars with his archrivals, a Jewish gang run by the famed hood Monk Eastman. The two groups engaged in constant brawls and once even squared off in a massive gun battle under the Second Avenue elevate...

    Led by the Jewish mobster Edward “Monk” Eastman, the Eastman Gang rose to become one of New York’s most feared criminal organizations in the 1890s. As the kings of Manhattan’s Lower East Side, the 1,200 “Eastmans” raked in huge profits running brothels, protection rackets, drug rings and even murder-for-hire operations. Like their rivals in the Five Points Gang, Eastman’s boys also teamed with corrupt politicians in voter fraud. In return, the city’s crooked lawmakers turned a blind eye to th...

  9. The story behind ''Gangs of New York'''s delay | EW.com

    ew.com/.../05/17/story-behind-gangs-new-yorks-delay

    May 17, 2002 · The story behind ''Gangs of New York'''s delay -- Scorsese's historical epic had a soaring budget, a rocky shoot, a nervous studio -- and Leo.

  10. Bill The Butcher: The Ruthless Gangster Of 1850s New York

    allthatsinteresting.com/bill-the-butcher

    Oct 03, 2019 · His bullying, violent temperament inspired the main antagonist in Martin Scorsese’s Gangs of New York but it ultimately led to his murder at age 33. New York City was a very different place in the mid-1800s, the kind of place where a egotistical, knife-wielding pugilist could win a place in the hearts — and tabloids — of the city’s masses.

  11. 10 photos of the real 19th Century Gangs of New York | All ...

    www.historyanswers.co.uk/people-politics/10...
    • Mulberry Bend. Where Mulberry Street crooks like an elbow within hail of the old depravity of the Five Points, is “the Bend,” foul core of New York’s slums.
    • “Bandit`s Roost” 59 1/2 Mullbery Street. In this metropolis, let it be understood, there is no public street where the stranger may not go safely by day and by night, provided he knows how to mind his own business and is sober.
    • “The Mongomery Guards” (A Growler Gang) Along the water-fronts, in the holes of the dock-rats, and on the avenues, the young tough finds plenty of kindred spirits.
    • A Growler Gang in Session. The gang is an institution in New York. The police deny its existence while nursing the bruises received in nightly battles with it that tax their utmost resources.