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  1. George Austen (clergyman) George Austen (1731–1805) was a clergyman in the Church of England and the father of Jane Austen. He was the rector of Deane and Steventon in Hampshire.

  2. George Austen (clergyman) - Wikipedia. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › George_Austen_(Clergyman) › wiki › George_Austen_(Clergyman)

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  4. George Austen (1731–1805) was a clergyman in the Church of England and the father of Jane Austen. He was the rector of Deane and Steventon in Hampshire. Early life and education He and his sister, Philadelphia, were orphaned, George being nine years old, and he was thus taken under the wing of his wealthy uncle Francis Austen.

  5. d43fweuh3sg51.cloudfront.net › Austenbio_2Jane Austen: Biography

    Born in 1775 to George and Cassandra Austen in the English village of Steventon, Jane Austen grew up in a highly literate family. Austen’s father was an Oxford-educated clergyman, and her mother was a humorous, aristocratic woman. Of Jane’s six brothers, two were also educated at Oxford and two became admirals in the Royal Navy.

  6. George Austen (1731–1805) was a clergyman in the Church of England and the father of Jane Austen. He was the rector of Deane and Steventon in Hampshire. He and his sister, Philadelphia, were orphaned, George being nine years old, and he was thus taken under the wing of his wealthy uncle Francis Austen.

    • About Jane Austen
    • Writing
    • Marriage Possibilities
    • 1805–1817
    • Novels Published
    • Novels
    • Family
    • Selected Quotations

    Jane Austen's father, George Austen, was an Anglican clergyman, and raised his family in his parsonage. Like his wife, Cassandra Leigh Austen, he was descended from landed gentry that had become involved in manufacturing with the coming of the Industrial Revolution. George Austen supplemented his income as a rector with farming and with tutoring boys who boarded with the family. The family was associated with the Tories and maintained a sympathy for the Stuart succession rather than the Hanoverian. Jane was sent for the first year or so of her life to stay with her wetnurse. Jane was close to her sister Cassandra, and letters to Cassandra that survive have helped later generations understand the life and work of Jane Austen. As was usual for girls at the time, Jane Austen was educated primarily at home; her brothers, other than George, were educated at Oxford. Jane was well-read; her father had a large library of books including novels. From 1782 to 1783, Jane and her older sister C...

    Jane Austen began writing, about 1787, circulating her stories mainly to family and friends. On George Austen's retirement in 1800, he moved the family to Bath, a fashionable social retreat. Jane found the environment was not conducive to her writing, and wrote little for some years, though she sold her first novel while living there. The publisher held it from publication until after her death.

    Jane Austen never married. Her sister, Cassandra, was engaged for a time to Thomas Fowle, who died in the West Indies and left her with a small inheritance. Jane Austen had several young men court her. One was Thomas Lefroy whose family opposed the match, another a young clergyman who suddenly died. Jane accepted the proposal of the wealthy Harris Bigg-Wither, but then withdrew her acceptance to the embarrassment of both parties and their families.

    When George Austen died in 1805, Jane, Cassandra, and their mother moved first to the home of Jane's brother Francis, who was frequently away. Their brother, Edward, had been adopted as heir by a wealthy cousin; when Edward's wife died, he provided a home for Jane and Cassandra and their mother on his estate. It was at this home in Chawton where Jane resumed her writing. Henry, a failed banker who had become a clergyman like his father, served as Jane's literary agent. Jane Austen died, probably of Addison's disease, in 1817. Her sister, Cassandra, nursed her during her illness. Jane Austen was buried in Winchester Cathedral.

    Jane Austen's novels were first published anonymously; her name does not appear as author until after her death. Sense and Sensibility was written "By a Lady," and posthumous publications of Persuasion and Northanger Abbey were credited simply to the author of Pride and Prejudice and Mansfield Park. Her obituaries disclosed that she had written the books, as does her brother Henry's "Biographical Notice" in editions of Northanger Abbey and Persuasion. Juvenilia were published posthumously.

    Northanger Abbey- sold 1803, not published until 1819
    Sense and Sensibility- published 1811 but Austen had to pay the printing costs
    Pride and Prejudice- 1812
    Mansfield Park- 1814
    Father: George Austen, Anglican clergyman, died 1805
    Mother: Cassandra Leigh
    Siblings: Jane Austen was the seventh of eight children.
    Aunt: Ann Cawley; Jane Austen and her sister Cassandra studied at her home 1782-3

    "For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?" "The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all — it is very tiresome." "Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery." "One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other." "A woman, especially if she has the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can." "One cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty." "If there is anything disagreeable going on men are always sure to get out of it." "What strange creatures brothers are!" "A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment." "Human nature is so well disposed towards those who are in interesting situations, that a young person, who either marries or dies, is sure to be kindly spoken of." "It is a truth universally acknowledge...

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